Want your record expunged? Salt Lake County has hired an 'expungement navigator' to help

S.L. County hires 'expungement navigator' to help clear criminal records

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  • at long last. . . Kirksville , MO
    June 26, 2019 7:23 a.m.

    This is not a smart thing. This is liberal rewriting of history. Folks should be accountable for their actions and just because they 'paid their penalty' to society, the facts should not be erased.

  • Emophiliac Vernal, UT
    June 26, 2019 7:14 a.m.

    Yeah, I remember these silly acts - going through my parent's house and hauling off anything that might be of value. For the perps who did this, one appears to have turned his life around and might be clean all these years later. I would consider clearing his record, if he hasn't reoffended. The other perp ended up in and out of prison, popping up on the news every few years. Given enough time, sure, forgive. But it had better be long enough to ensure that things have changed. Some never deserve it.

  • mrjj69 Bountiful, UT
    June 26, 2019 5:35 a.m.

    I get a bad feeling about this. if a (reformed) drug addict shows the same clean record as someone who has lived a law-abiding life, an employer could think they are hiring the latter rather than the former. 2 years is not enough time to prove sobriety.

  • DrGroovey Salt Lake City, UT
    June 25, 2019 11:02 p.m.

    I predict we will regret this down the road. I am all for expungement after someone demonstrates a long period of being a contributing member of society. They are making it too easy though now. I, for one, want to know if I am renting to someone with a drug conviction or other criminal history. I also want the Boy Scouts and other organizations that work with kids to know if they are hiring people with criminal backgrounds. If one of these expedited expunged people gets a job because of it and ends up hurting a child, who will be the one to get sued for negligence?

  • CanUImagine Draper, UT
    June 25, 2019 8:33 p.m.

    The $150,000 is a drop in the bucket when compared with the millions being spent on “helping the homeless” or jail time & legal processes that continue to punish people.
    These folks made a mistake, cost them dearly, brought huge financial burdens on taxpayer as they would be incurring tax dollars spent on legal work, jail administration, medical recovery, etc. Now they have overcome the initial problem, the task should be easy to “erase” these negative points from their records.

    This is much like “points” that are charge on your drivers license. After “x” amount of time the record is wiped clean and you have a new slate. That’s seems to be what this “expungement” process is about. However, unlike the easy ‘cleanup driving records’, our system has to many entries that have documented a persons struggles in multitudes of databases.

    Hats off to all those who have cleaned up their lives, overcome the years of struggle and who are climbing out of their holes because someone was kind enough to lower a ladder. Great job, keep up the progress.

  • ji_ Ketchikan, AK
    June 25, 2019 8:20 p.m.

    Seven arrests and only two years have passed? Maybe it is too soon for expungement. Two years might be okay for a youthful or one-time misdemeanor, but not for multiple repeated offenses. But, best wishes to them.

  • cjb Bountiful, UT
    June 25, 2019 7:35 p.m.

    I've long wondered why jail and prison for the most part doesn't last forever but the criminal record does.

    Why we have job training in the prisons, but we also saddle the people get out of prison with a criminal record making it hard for them to get a job.

  • stanfunky Salt Lake City, UT
    June 25, 2019 5:53 p.m.

    DNSubscriber said: "But, members of society who have been the victims of criminals should not have to pay tax dollars to help clear criminal records."

    Yet all members of society pay for the incarceration and court appeals, therapy, etc.
    Which are all much more expensive than a simple $150,000 amount annually.

  • RFMLayton Layton, UT
    June 25, 2019 5:40 p.m.

    The bureaucratic court system is bogged down and needs reforming. One of my daughter-in-laws got a misdemeanor when she shopped lifted as an 18 year old. It was stupid and she paid her dues, or so she thought. She went on to get a college education, of course never stole again and she waited for her 5-year probation to be over. Until that time, we worked dead end jobs in restaurants as servers and made lousy money and couldn't get on with her career or life. Well after 5 years of restaurant work and finally hitting 5-years, it took another 8 months for a judge to finally look at her case, finish the paper work and expunge her record. This system is a little messed up.

  • VIDAR Murray, UT
    June 25, 2019 4:37 p.m.

    RE: DN subscriber

    $150,000 is about what we spend to keep three people in prison.
    I am pretty sure we as taxpayers come out ahead by helping people to get a second chance, and an opportunity to get work and pay taxes.
    I can think of several taxpayer programs that cost us millions and are of questionable value.

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    June 25, 2019 3:59 p.m.

    @DNSubscriber;
    "However, why should law abiding taxpayers be paying $150,000 to help them do this? Haven't we already paid enough to arrest, prosecute and then incarcerate or rehabilitate them?
    If lawyers or social workers or others want to volunteer their time, or of someone wants to donate funds to pay them, that is great."

    Ever hear of "Parents Empowered"? I've been seeing their commercials and promos all over the TV. They're having a big push at Hogle Zoo this week. It's a program to lecture kids on underage drinking. It has a full time staff and good sized advertising budget. It's funded by Utah taxpayers to the tune of 2.3 million/year. Maybe they recognize that preventive and helpful programs can save the State a lot more future costs. Maybe the State should cut funding and rely on volunteers and private funding?

  • Whale of Fortune Salt Lake City, UT
    June 25, 2019 2:49 p.m.

    I agree, DNS. I am strongly in favor, in principle, but this kind of program should be self-funding.

  • shamrock Salt Lake City, UT
    June 25, 2019 2:31 p.m.

    Think of it this way, DNSubscriber: If you make it tougher and more expensive for people to reform and become good citizens, you may very well end up paying more for the criminal justice system costs when they relapse. In the long run, helping these folks find steady jobs and good housing is probably cheaper for the taxpayers. Plus, it's kind.

    To me, it makes more sense to pay taxes for better human services programs than to foot the bills for more insurance, living in a gated community with guards and alarm systems and dealing with all the long-term social costs of drug abuse, unemployment and mental health problems.

  • DN Subscriber Cottonwood Heights, UT
    June 25, 2019 1:04 p.m.

    Expungement is good, if merited and the person with the criminal record jumps through the required hoops. Congratulations to those who go forth with a clean record and lead productive, crime-free lives.

    However, why should law abiding taxpayers be paying $150,000 to help them do this? Haven't we already paid enough to arrest, prosecute and then incarcerate or rehabilitate them?

    If lawyers or social workers or others want to volunteer their time, or of someone wants to donate funds to pay them, that is great. But, members of society who have been the victims of criminals should not have to pay tax dollars to help clear criminal records.