In our opinion: Reclaim Father's Day from the grips of Hollywood

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  • NoNamesAccepted St. George, UT
    June 17, 2019 8:02 p.m.

    @Impartial7: "In the 50's and 60's for every "Ward Cleaver" there were 20 fathers that came home, had 4-5 drinks, beat their kids if they had misbehaved and treated their wive's like 2nd class citizens."

    Wow. Where and under what conditions were you raised? I've never experienced nor heard of such behavior being the norm nor accepted by decent society.

    It is true that women's opportunities in the professional workplaces were far more limited in the 50s and 60s than they are today. Men were less likely to do as much indoor housework as they do today. And the legal system was slower to intervene in cases of domestic abuse.

    But drunkardness, physical abuse, and general mistreatment of their wives and children?

    That was the very rare, socially condemned exception in both my and my parents' communities in rural Utah. From my reading, it was rare in the low income, immigrant neighborhoods of NYC and Chicago.

    Where did you grow up to see such behavior as normal and accepted? Or what study have you done or read that supports your claims?

  • NeifyT Salt Lake City, UT
    June 17, 2019 9:40 a.m.

    "So if it’s not for ties and grills, then what? Is it a celebration of bumbling, half-wit sitcom fathers? Is it a day for praising the paunchy figurehead forever consigned to wearing mustard polos and embarrassing his children in front of their friends?"

    Hollywood didn't use to portray father's that way. Maybe current shows they do. But, the shows I watch (many different shows) all portray fatherhood the exact opposite of that. For instance the show "Father Knows Best" is certainly a sitcom; but it portrays a father who really did act as the ideal role model for his children. Not that everything was always perfect in the family; or even with the father; but he was not portrayed in any negativity. Yesterday Antennae TV had a Father Knows Best marathon; of which I caught a couple episodes; in which the father was always saving the day.

    My Three Sons, The Brady Bunch, The Andy Griffith Show are three other ones I think of when I think of father roles. But, there are plenty other ones as well. I don't know when Hollywood started embracing the concept of half-wit bumbling men; but perhaps that is why I like the old shows.

  • RiDal Sandy, UT
    June 17, 2019 7:25 a.m.

    Impartial7 Said:
    "...for every "Ward Cleaver" there were 20 fathers that came home, had 4-5 drinks, beat their kids if they had misbehaved and treated their wive's like 2nd class citizens."

    That is utterly false.
    And I rest my case from below.

  • RiDal Sandy, UT
    June 17, 2019 7:25 a.m.

    What better way to destroy a nation than to demean every aspect of masculinity, make all males appear to be cartoonish, bumbling fools, and in the end to actually make the concept of masculinity "evil" by labeling it "toxic masculinity". The Progressive Left created a fantasy about "interference with our elections", yet they actively cooperate with the destruction of our society.

  • A Scientist Provo, UT
    June 16, 2019 10:00 p.m.

    Fatherhood is not under attack by Hollywood nor anyone else. There is no war on Christmas, nor on religious freedom. The sky is not falling, America is not collapsing, and the Constitution is not hanging by a thread. And we are not all going to that hot place in a handbasket. Stop the fear-mongering and divisive rhetoric.

  • worf McAllen, TX
    June 16, 2019 6:50 p.m.

    @Impartial7,

    In some rare situations and places, what you say is true.

    Most all of my friends had responsible dads and lived lived in good homes. I have lived in several places within our country and good family life was the norm.

  • Light and Liberty St George, UT
    June 16, 2019 6:16 p.m.

    Whether Ward Cleaver was a Hollywood illusion or not, I felt my years growing up reflected more of Leave it to Beaver and Andy Griffeth than I see from many misdirected fathers today. Imho, the problems we have today are the result, not of women's lib, but of not enough men doing the work of men. Women haven't help by circumventing what was once the purview of men, providing for their families, but there are way too many men that have welcomed their wives into the work force so they can twiddle their thumbs and pursue hobbies.

  • I M LDS 2 Provo, UT
    June 16, 2019 5:15 p.m.

    Sounds like DN OpEd Board (do they have names?) are pining for the days when Fatherhood was best described by Bill Cosby... oh, wait! That can't be right!

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    June 16, 2019 3:29 p.m.

    "worf - McAllen, TX
    June 16, 2019 2:06 p.m.
    The days of Ward Cleaver are gone."

    The days of Ward Cleaver never happened. He was a Hollywood figment. In the 50's and 60's for every "Ward Cleaver" there were 20 fathers that came home, had 4-5 drinks, beat their kids if they had misbehaved and treated their wive's like 2nd class citizens.

  • worf McAllen, TX
    June 16, 2019 2:06 p.m.

    The days of Ward Cleaver are gone.

    Today, fathers are portrayed as bumbling idiots who constantly irritate their wives and children.

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    June 16, 2019 11:44 a.m.

    I'm not sure the image of today's father or man is solely the result of the despised Hollywood. True, there are plenty of bumbling fathers offset by supermoms on tv, but there are more than a few men in the world now that aren't doing our team proud. I've seen far too many young men now who are clueless about the world around them but well versed in this or that video game or the exploits of some professional athlete entertainer. They would be incapable of and unmotivated to achieve many of the most basic tasks of parenting. I guess it's good in that regard that our birth rates are falling.