Taylor Halverson: Why did Jesus suffer in an olive garden called Gethsemane?

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  • Y Ask Y Provo, UT
    June 19, 2019 6:46 a.m.

    Ooh, olive garden, their mussels in white wine sauce are delicious!

  • mhenshaw Leesburg, VA
    June 17, 2019 6:24 a.m.

    >>Once he shows up, I'll believe. IF he is real, he knows where I live...

    "Jesus saith unto him, 'Thomas, because thou hast seen me, thou hast believed: blessed are they that have not seen, and yet have believed.'" --John 20:29

    If Jesus was resurrected, it changes the entire human condition. It would mean that we are not the random byproducts of an uncaring universe, doomed to eternal oblivion upon death. So, given that possibility, it behooves us individually to explore whether Christ's resurrection actually happened. How can we know? Well, there is historical evidence supporting the NT accounts. In addition to that, we can experiment by applying his teachings now as recorded in the Gospel narratives to our daily lives.

    "Jesus answered them, and said, 'My doctrine is not mine, but his that sent me. If any man will do his will, he shall know of the doctrine, whether it be of God, or whether I speak of myself.'" -- John 7:16-17

    If applying his teachings produce the results He promised, then we can have more confidence that those narratives are faithful accounts of true events and not just fiction stories. But a wait-and-see approach gets no one closer to an answer either way.

  • The Atheist Provo, UT
    June 14, 2019 9:49 p.m.

    mhenshaw - "If He was resurrected, He could have later recounted to His disciples what happened in the Garden and what He said."

    Indeed, IF he was resurrected, he could recount to any and all of us, without any need for mediators, anything he would like.

    Once he shows up, I'll believe. IF he is real, he knows where I live...

  • Craig Clark Boulder, CO
    June 13, 2019 2:06 p.m.

    Central Texan,
    "Matthew dedicates about 28% of his Gospel to the last week onward. Mark dedicates about 38% and Luke about 25%. A word count might show a slightly different percentage but it does not seem like a "majority" of their words. . . . "
    ____________________
    It's not even close to a majority but it is glaringly disproportionate. Let’s stop and think about it for a moment. One week in the context of three years of Jesus life starting with his baptism? One week!

    The obvious answer frequently proposed and which I find likely is that the passion of Jesus was THE story of Jesus at the outset. The one first told and most meticulously preserved in tradition at the very outset of developing narratives about his life. It was a story so powerful that it called for more biographical background on what preceded the events of the week of his betrayal and crucifixion.

  • Central Texan Buda, TX
    June 13, 2019 1:04 p.m.

    Second comment is the following statement: "Each of the four Gospels records that Jesus suffered excruciating pain in the Garden of Gethsemane."

    I'm not seeing it. Luke best describes the pain by saying Jesus was "in agony" and that "his sweat was as it were great drops of blood" (Luke 22:44). Matthew and Mark's accounts in Gethsemane are nearly identical and the description of suffering is at best told in these words: "sore amazed," "very heavy," and "my soul is exceeding sorrowful unto death" (Matt. 26:37-38, Mark 14:33-34).

    John, however, does not even mention anything about Gethsemane (and not by name) except to say Jesus and his apostles went there and Jesus was apprehended there (John 18:1)

  • Central Texan Buda, TX
    June 13, 2019 1:01 p.m.

    A few things struck me as not quite right as I read the article, which I need to break into two comment.

    First is this: "The New Testament Gospels follow this pattern, particularly Mark, Matthew and Luke. The majority of their words are focused on the last week of Jesus' life, with special attention to how he died and his unexpected and triumphant resurrection."

    How is it that Mark, Matthew, and Luke are said to particularly follow the pattern of focusing on the last week of Jesus's life and subsequent resurrection? Using the chapter in each gospel where Jesus makes his triumphal entry into Jerusalem as the baseline and using whole chapters as the units, Matthew dedicates about 28% of his Gospel to the last week onward. Mark dedicates about 38% and Luke about 25%. A word count might show a slightly different percentage but it does not seem like a "majority" of their words. In contrast, John begins the last week in chapter 12 and dedicates some 48% of his Gospel to the the last week onward. John more than the others follows the pattern.

  • hbeckett Colfax, CA
    June 13, 2019 11:11 a.m.

    seeing that I know the sins that I have committed they are a painful reminder that I was not being good and I am thankful that my savior took my sins and suffered for them they still press down hard on me as I recall them and I do need another chance to be able to return home where I want to go and be with my father and savior for eternity as I look over my life I would like a do over chance even each day is a challenge some time but I am learning where to put my trust and faith

  • mhenshaw Leesburg, VA
    June 13, 2019 5:28 a.m.

    >>The gospels record that Jesus went into the Garden alone. No one was beside him to overhear his reported prayer or witness his reported agony, much less provide us with a detailed written account of it several years later.

    If He was resurrected, He could have later recounted to His disciples what happened in the Garden and what He said.

  • george of the jungle goshen, UT
    June 13, 2019 4:50 a.m.

    The stuff that He sweated was thick like that made him supper sensitive, He was whipped than had to carry a cross nailed in a way He couldn't breathe unless He could push up relaxing the chest. Gethsemane, not the suffering place. He fulfilled Mosses law an started a new law. If you Believe. If I need someone to vowch for me I'd want the Lord Jesus. Who else could.

  • CMTM , 00
    June 12, 2019 12:15 p.m.

    The most important impact of this night was the willingness of our Savior to die on ‘the cross’ in our place in order to pay the penalty for our sins.

    God “made Him who knew no sin, to be sin for us, that we might become the righteousness of God in Him” (2 Cor 5:21)
    Such a high priest truly befits us--One who is holy, innocent, undefiled, set apart from sinners ….”. Heb 7:26

    But you know that Christ appeared to take away sins, and in Him there is no sin. 1 John 3:5. Jesus was born without sin. The unique miracle of the virgin birth.

  • Craig Clark Boulder, CO
    June 12, 2019 11:05 a.m.

    The gospels record that Jesus went into the Garden alone. No one was beside him to overhear his reported prayer or witness his reported agony, much less provide us with a detailed written account of it several years later. But as the place where he was betrayed with a kiss and taken captive may be authentic history.

  • cthulhu_fhtagn Seattle, WA
    June 12, 2019 9:46 a.m.

    Author's artistic choice?