Jay Evensen: Is Utah soft compared to hard-working states?

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  • Diligent Dave Logan, UT
    June 17, 2019 2:57 p.m.

    ...Like Dr James Croft, stats professor for years at the University of Utah told us the several times I took the same course (trying to improve my grade in that class, without necessarily studying any more or harder than I had done when I took the class previously), "Figures don't lie, but liars figure!"

    In other words, statistics might be accurate. But how they are framed, figured, and back stories, may convey a completely different story than the story most suppose is what those "facts" are presenting! -

    Aaron, here's what I said 2nd post--

    (continued from 1st post) ...Like Dr James Croft, stats professor for years at the University of Utah told us the several times I took the same course (trying to improve my grade in that class, without necessarily studying any more or harder than I had done when I took the class previously), "Figures don't lie, but liars figure!"

    In other words, statistics might be accurate. But how they are framed, figured, and back stories, may convey a completely different story than the story most suppose is what those "facts" are presenting!

  • 1covey Salt Lake City, UT
    June 15, 2019 9:01 a.m.

    Reading the comments reinforces my contention that statistics can be misleading and in fact statistics can be called the mathematics of ignorance. It can tell what a very large group of people or particles will probably do, but not what one/few person(s) or particle(s) will do. In dealing with people, it can be much worse when important factors are ignored as has been pointed out.

  • Diligent Dave Logan, UT
    June 14, 2019 3:50 p.m.

    Undoubtedly, the reason why Utahns (on average) work the least per week is because Utah is consistently at or near the top in the number of babies we have (though in 2017, that rate was down to 212 babies born for every 100 women per lifetime, which is pretty much 'exact replacement'.

    But still, we're generally higher than any other state.

    Fast forward 18 years (from any child's birth), and lo, and behold, a good number of those once babies will likely be employed. Since many are still under the health insurance coverage of either mom or dad, they take what they can get (as a job). And, since hourly work rates determine often whether or not an employer has to give any employee health insurance benefit, they often offer jobs with fewer hours, so they don't have to.

    That said, we have more 'kids' working fewer hours, which brings the overall average number of hours worked per week down.

    How far down? Far enough to indicate Utahns work the least of any others (on average) in their respective, other states.

    I guarantee you this is the likely true back story to that statistic.

  • A Scientist Provo, UT
    June 14, 2019 9:50 a.m.

    No, no, Utah cannot possibly be worse than other states in any way, shape, or form!

    All is well in Zion!

    All is well. All is well. (Sing with me now!)

  • packers roy, UT
    June 13, 2019 9:25 a.m.

    I've always believed that we have things backwards, we should work 2 days and play the other 5...there (IMO) are just a lot more things to do in this State than work, so we get out and play as much as we can... as far as what I know about this States economy, work ethic isn't a problem

  • RedShirtMIT Cambridge, MA
    June 13, 2019 8:42 a.m.

    The premise and headline for this are very misleading.

    The headline should be "People in Utah spend less time in the office". It isn't that people go to work, put in their hours, then go home and relax until bed time.

    I fact, you can probably make the argument that Utah has the hardest workers. Per the KUTV article "Study: Utahns watch the least amount of TV in the nation". On average we watch 2 hours 13 minutes per day. Some states are as high as 4 hours per day. If you look at what the "favorite" type of programming in Utah is, you find that it kids that are watching cartoons on TV.

  • MabelPines Pleasant Grove, UT
    June 13, 2019 8:27 a.m.

    Just factoring in young mothers who work a few hours a week would skew the results.

  • MrLogic Brigham City, UT
    June 13, 2019 6:42 a.m.

    "More hours" does not equate to "harder."

    In a study published in 2017, researchers from the Australian National University's Research School of Population Health concluded that working more than 39 hours a week is detrimental to one's health. The lead researcher, Dr. Huong Dinh, said, "Long work hours erode a person's mental and physical health, because it leaves less time to eat well and look after themselves properly."

    Being busy has been heralded as an important part of life for far too long. We should try focusing on something that matters instead.

  • IJ Hyrum, Ut
    June 13, 2019 6:35 a.m.

    "That’s right. No matter how hard you think you’re working, people in other states are working harder." Harder? How do you calculate how hard a person works? Spending more time around the water cooler is measureable but harder - I think not.

  • From Ted's Head Orem, UT
    June 12, 2019 5:38 p.m.

    Utah ranks number one in the nation for volunteering. Utah also has the largest families (by average) in the country. Perhaps we don't work as much as others do because we are spending that time with family and helping our neighbors.

  • Brave Sir Robin San Diego, CA
    June 12, 2019 3:18 p.m.

    "Do we want to be known as the state most like Europe?" - Jay Evensen

    What's wrong with being like Europe? Almost every European country reports greater mean happiness levels than the U.S. And isn't that the point of all this?

    "No man on his death bed has ever said 'you know, I wish I'd spent more time at work'." - Gordon B. Hinckley

  • Utahnareapeculiarpeople Salt Lake City, UT
    June 12, 2019 2:07 p.m.

    "I’m sure by now you’ve come up with several reasons that might explain all this. Utahns value families, which probably translates into a desire to leave work quickly and go home to play with the kids. Or, if you’re a bit more cynical, you may believe it’s harder to get a full-time job here than elsewhere, resulting in fewer hours worked."

    Or maybe the predominant local religion's frowning on working on Sundays? For professionals, that can be a big difference.

  • lost in DC West Jordan, UT
    June 12, 2019 2:07 p.m.

    i wonder how the study accounts for stay-at-home moms?

    and despite not working as many hours, we still exceed the national median household income. we must be doing something right.

  • andyjaggy American Fork, UT
    June 12, 2019 2:03 p.m.

    The real question is, is this a bad thing? I probably work between 35-40 hours per weak on average. If we can be smart and productive who cares who many hours it takes to get our jobs done? Employees with a life outside of work are better and more productive when they are at work.

  • cjb Bountiful, UT
    June 12, 2019 1:15 p.m.

    Work too long for too long and you become less efficient and less effective. I don't know what the optimal amount of time spent working is for the most productivity but if it is 40 hours per week, then it was by luck and coincidence that we chose that number.

    As automation makes increasing inroads, it makes sense that we would lessen our work week. It wouldn't be the first time we've done it. Before the work week was 40 hours per week, it was much more than that.

  • cjb Bountiful, UT
    June 12, 2019 1:16 p.m.

    Work too long for too long and you become less efficient and less effective. I don't know what the optimal amount of time spent working is for the most productivity but if it is 40 hours per week, then it was by luck and coincidence that we chose that number.

    As automation makes increasing inroads, it makes sense that we would lessen our work week. It wouldn't be the first time we've done it. Before the work week was 40 hours per week, it was much more than that.

  • The Great Helmsman Salt Lake City, UT
    June 12, 2019 12:45 p.m.

    I would say this is about right. By 2:30 on Friday afternoon 2/3 of the cars in my office tower lot are gone.

    And have you ever seen the number of pickups towing boats on I-15 by the middle of a summer Friday afternoon?

    Industry? Yeah, right.