Church News: Basketball led Church's first African-American General Authority to Christianity

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  • The Atheist Provo, UT
    June 15, 2019 8:02 p.m.

    procuradorfiscal,

    I have declared no faith.

    What part of atheist are you struggling to understand?

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    June 14, 2019 4:28 p.m.

    Re: ". . . the only appropriate time to share your religious beliefs is when someone begs you incessantly for months to do so!"

    I don't recall begging you incessantly for months to share your religious beliefs.

    The fact that the iconoclastic beliefs you express here run contrary to those of most of the rest of us, in no way makes your beliefs more palatable, acceptable, or "scientific" than ours. Yours are based -- as much as ours -- on physically unverifiable, unfalsifiable anectotal conjecture and hypothesis -- in other words "faith."

    Suggesting it's inappropriate to share our faith, all the while loudly proclaiming your own, seems embarrassingly disingenuous, to me.

  • PP Eagle Mountain, UT
    June 14, 2019 4:26 p.m.

    dordrecht - you are right. I forgot about Elijah Able. Also, for some reason this article forgot about Elder Helvacio Martins. So Elder Johnson would be the third black member of the 70 in modern times.

    I am not sure if this post will be approved by the des news moderator, because I posted about Elder Martins a couple of days ago and they rejected my post. Maybe they don't know who Elder Martins is.

  • dordrecht Salt Lake City, UT
    June 14, 2019 9:17 a.m.

    Since religious history is most interesting, I found that on March 3, 1836 Joseph Smith authorized the ordination of African-American Elijah Abel (also spelled Able) to the office of elder. On December 20 of the same year, Abel was ordained to the office of Seventy. Consequently, Elder Peter M. Johnson is the second African-American to become a Seventy in the history of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

  • higv Dietrich, ID
    June 14, 2019 6:54 a.m.

    @the atheist what country is this? The first amendment gives you the right to share your beliefs anywhere? Who is forcing you to accept other beliefs? Where is the right not to be offended found?

    You have no problem sharing your doubt on a paper owned by the church. As long as there is freedom of religion people will share there beliefs no one is forcing you to accept them.

    Interracial couple as a General Authority as well. Been several religions. I donlt mind getting baptized Jehpvahs Witness on Oct 30th and a exed Nov 1st. Donlt have to answer door to trick or treaters. Of course more complicated to join that church than that of course.

  • The Atheist Provo, UT
    June 12, 2019 6:31 a.m.

    "Utah Blue Devil, Make sure you call the brethren right away and tell them they're doing it wrong."

    "@Utahbluedevil missionary work is by FAR most effective when led by members. We shouldn't need to have scouts, dances or basketball to share out (sic) beliefs with those around us."

    The Blue Devil is not wrong. I'm sure "the Brethren" are fully aware that more than 3/4 of "converts" are no longer active after a year. The "programs" are not working.

    Please don't share your beliefs at work, nor at school, nor at the grocery store, nor on the back 9, nor over the backyard fence. If you think about it, the only appropriate time to share your religious beliefs is when someone begs you incessantly for months to do so!

    Changing "Home Teaching" to "ministering" was transforming a lame, ineffective program into an impotent program.

    My LDS neighbors brought by traditional chocolate chip cookies the other day. Nobody in the house can eat them because of dietary restrictions. Who knew? Not our assigned "ministers"! Meaningless assignments.

    The "programs" aren't working. The new programs are even less effective. "Community" is becoming as outdated as the Walkman.

  • PacificCreek Puyallup, WA
    June 11, 2019 7:29 p.m.

    @Utahbluedevil missionary work is by FAR most effective when led by members. We shouldn't need to have scouts, dances or basketball to share out beliefs with those around us.

  • skeptic Phoenix, AZ
    June 11, 2019 10:14 a.m.

    An inspiring and encouraging life story, and to think how not too many years back this would have been unheard of and unaccepted. It is satisfying to see progress and social enlightenment in the church's progress into the twenty first century.

  • Brave Sir Robin San Diego, CA
    June 11, 2019 9:48 a.m.

    @Utah Blue Devil

    Make sure you call the brethren right away and tell them they're doing it wrong.

  • UtahBlueDevil Alpine, UT
    June 11, 2019 8:09 a.m.

    I love this story, and find it most ironic as well...

    "It was in Hawaii that Elder Johnson discovered sports — especially basketball — and started down a road that would lead to a university education and membership in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints."

    This was at age 15. Today we have in the "field" lost many of those programs that used to bring non-members through our doors. Youth sports, Boy Scouts....Dances.... it was what brought many young people through our doors, introduced them to the mormon community, and made them feel comfortable being part of our LDS community. But for the most parts, most of these activities are vestiges of the past.

    We spend thousands sending our youth on missions around the world, and yet those things that brought non-member Youth through our doors are being divested. My wife joined the church due to the Young Womens program in Savannah Georgia. I would encourage all leaders to remember the value of these programs externally, to make our building welcome places in our communities, where people feel safe and welcoming to non-members. We will send out kids thousands of miles away to teach, when at home there is a need.