In our opinion: Remembering the sacrifices of D-Day this Memorial Day

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  • Vanka Provo, UT
    May 27, 2019 1:05 p.m.

    Patterned after Alexander the Great's military strategies, the June 6th Normandy invasion was only half the strategy. On August 15, 1944, Allied forces in the European Theater also invaded southern France. "D-Day" was the "Hammer", and Operation Anvil, later renamed "Dragoon," occurred at the Gulf of Leon east of Marseilles in Southern France. Together, they were "Operation Overlord".

    The U.S. 7th Army’s amphibious invasion of southern France following six weeks of aerial bombardment, the infantry, armor, airborne, and commando forces of Maj. Gen. Truscott’s VI Corps assaulted German positions along a 45-mile stretch of French coastline from St. RaphaËl to St. Tropez. Preceded by the commandos of the 1st Special Service Force and the paratroopers of the 1st Airborne Task Force, the assault battalions of the 3rd, 36th and 45th infantry divisions landed on the French Riviera.

    While American forces secured the beachhead and pushed inland, dislodging the defenders of the German 19th Army, the French ArmÉe B came ashore over the landing beaches to capture the ports of Toulon and Marseille, eventually culminating in French General Charles de Gaulle "triumphal entry" into free Paris.

  • Brave Sir Robin San Diego, CA
    May 27, 2019 11:30 a.m.

    @water rocket

    "Memorial Day is about honoring our dead ancestors, whether it be a soldier, a mother, an infant, a sibling, or any other loved one"

    Incorrect. From The History Channel: "Memorial Day is an American holiday, observed on the last Monday of May, honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military."

    If you want to use the day to remember all your dead relatives, then great. But don't try to redefine what the day is actually for.

  • majmajor Layton, UT
    May 27, 2019 10:36 a.m.

    water rocket - , 00
    May 27, 2019 9:39 a.m.
    I think it is fine to honor our fallen soldiers, BUT, Memorial Day is about honoring our dead ancestors, whether it be a soldier, a mother, an infant, a sibling, or any other loved one.
    --------
    In Utah, you can believe the above, but the day is officially set aside to honor those who died in the military in the service of our great nation.

    Memorial Day (or less commonly called Decoration Day) is a federal holiday in the United States for remembering and honoring people who have died while serving in the United States Armed Forces.

    It is like President's Day... It is officially to honor Presidents Washington, and Lincoln, the two presidents who created, and supported the Union. It is not to be watered-down with the other clueless individuals who have held the elected office.

  • worf McAllen, TX
    May 27, 2019 9:47 a.m.

    Had the honor of visiting Normandy France a few weeks ago. Thousands were killed in less than an hour.

    Thank you to those who gave their lives for our freedoms today!

    May we realize the blessings we enjoy each day.

  • water rocket , 00
    May 27, 2019 9:39 a.m.

    I think it is fine to honor our fallen soldiers, BUT, Memorial Day is about honoring our dead ancestors, whether it be a soldier, a mother, an infant, a sibling, or any other loved one.

    Last year after Memorial Day I realized that I had never visited the grave on my great grandfather and great grandmother. The fact was that I didn't even know where they were buried. After some research I found that they were buried in unmarked graves, along with a second wife and seven children who had died in their infancy. It took a lot of research to figure out how all of them were related, and to make matters more difficult, I found that my G-grandfather was listed with the wrong given name (which we got corrected).

    Together with a large number of relatives, we placed headstones on every grave. This Memorial Day things were much more special, as we "remembered" the sacrifices of these ancestors. EVERY person who has passed away deserves to be remembered, especially on this one day set aside to remember them.

  • Vanka Provo, UT
    May 27, 2019 3:40 a.m.

    When the invasion came, the German high command was enjoying the high life back at the ChÂteau de Sully, where they also suffered from the total, disastrous failure of German intelligence.

    The Allies controlled the air and the sea lanes and most of the beaches: 76,000 poorly trained Germans were opposing over 150,000 British, American and Canadian troops.

    But Hitler, the great strategist (the stable genius of his day) was still not convinced that it was the real thing. And he had the impregnable "Atlantic Wall"!

    His top military leaders knew the Wall was a myth. Nothing in front of it, nothing behind it. A bluff aimed at fooling the German people more than the enemy.

    Without air cover the Wehrmacht was slaughtered by saturation bombing that would have spiced up Dante’s and Milton’s description of hell.

    At Utah Beach, where Yankee Lieutenant Winters managed to take out the deadly German 88mm gun and establish a beachhead, the German defenders were reserve troops who had not trained in combat and had been tending their Normandy gardens for years.

    They were told that the "Czech hedgehogs" and "Belgian Gates" would impale the charging Americans in the sea.

    That didn't work.

  • Vanka Provo, UT
    May 27, 2019 2:57 a.m.

    When the wicked rule, the people mourn.

    Imagine the overwhelmed Wehrmacht soldiers inside their bunkers as 6,700 ships loom suddenly on the horizon. No time to think as naval heavy guns unleash projectiles weighing as much as two tonnes. They have been caught by surprise, and may have a couple of heavy machine guns, a Panzerfaust (bazooka), and limited ammunition.

    Before they know it, the beach has been blasted to smithereens, landing boats are hitting the shoreline and men are charging, knee-high in water. Overhead, Allied planes are attacking the German rear. There are no Luftwaffe airplanes anywhere in sight.

    They didn't stand a chance. But they fire their weapons and stand their ground, until their pillbox is blasted open and they fall to a man.

    Spielberg and his ilk have shown the landing parties on the beaches to be sitting ducks, but that's not real history. Such a huge disparity in men and materiel between the Allied forces and the Germans made the defense at Normandy as hopeless as a charge-of-the-light-brigade contest. The German "defenders" were so outmatched all we can do is pity them.

  • rlynn Brandon, FL
    May 26, 2019 5:32 p.m.

    As a son of a veteran of the D-day Invasion I can only relate was my father wrote about that day:
    "As it has been said ‘war is hell’. At times you can’t think back only forward. We acquire a certain trait in the fear of death or in being ‘scared to death’."

    We remember and pay our respects to those who never came home, we honor those who came home with a grief in their hearts for those they left behind on the battle field. Dad never spoke of the War, he did not want or care to remember what he did and saw.

  • one old man MSC, UT
    May 26, 2019 3:11 p.m.

    I went to a Bees game last night, and it struck me that there was a very big difference between this game and ones I attended long, long ago when the little boy I was then went to Lakefront Stadium to watch the Cleveland Indians play.

    In those days, everyone in the stadium at all sporting events, would stand and we would ALL join in singing the words of our National Anthem. (Yes, we actually knew the words. Even our president did.)

    We lost something as a nation when we stopped doing that.

    Something important.

  • 1covey Salt Lake City, UT
    May 26, 2019 12:52 p.m.

    While there have been other heroic events , D-Day has great significance. Few realize that there was a nighttime precursor to D-Day. Read "Night Drop" by S.L.A. Marshall : paratroopers and glider troops doing a night assault to seal off Normandy beaches.

  • majmajor Layton, UT
    May 26, 2019 10:32 a.m.

    God bless those who served and died in the service of our nation. Today, to few know the pain and costs of serving our nation.

    De Oppresso Liber