Is there a wage gap at Utah colleges, universities? Update to 1985 policy asks for wage, salary data

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  • RiDal Sandy, UT
    April 2, 2019 12:23 p.m.

    One question clarifies all the follow-on questions that might be asked:

    If there is no wage gap, will the Grievance Industry be satisfied and be quiet ?

  • Casey See Brentwood, CA
    April 2, 2019 10:46 a.m.

    Simply comparing wages for a position by sex, age, and ethnicity is misleading. Considering the following:

    Associate professor position:
    White, Male, 38 makes 78,500 annually
    Black, Male, 42 makes 64,800 annually

    It looks like there is a major issue here. But now add two more data points. Education, and experience, and lets see how this looks

    Associate professor position
    White, Male, 38, Doctorate in subject matter, 10 years teaching since getting PHD - 78,500 annually
    Black, Male, 42, Doctorate in a related but different subject matter, 2nd year teaching since getting PHD - 64,800.

    In the second scenario, the discrepancy no longer seems inappropriate.

    Now, there may yet be underlying issues that still need to be addressed as to why the Black male didn't get his PHD until he was 39 verses the While male getting his PHD at 27 and has been teaching since. Perhaps the Black Male, worked in the private or government sector for 20 years in a totally different discipline and got his PHD in his off hours.

    But to tell one that you are going to get a paid at a certain rate or not strictly based upon your social classification, we need to make sure this doesn't happen.

  • From Ted's Head Orem, UT
    March 31, 2019 7:43 a.m.

    The "gender wage gap" continues to be a controversial issue. In Utah there are some key factors of choice that factor into the wage gap, primarily the decision that many women make to drop out of the workforce to bear and raise children. Later, when returning to the workforce, they are often paid less than their male counterparts due to their lack of employment continuity or fewer years of relevant job experience. It has also been noted that in some fields male employees work longer hours than their female co-workers as they don't have primary responsibility for caring for their children. This can lead to the impression that the guys are more dedicated to their jobs.

    Which is not to say that there isn't some lingering gender bias, a holdover from the days when men were paid more because "they had to support a family." Candidly, one might ask if when comparing two equal job candidates--one male, one female, both of whom are likely to become parents to children during the term of their expected employment--whether gender is a relevant factor.

    I hope that the data and subsequent analyses of the wage info is presented accurately and not slanted with the typical cause-driven bias.

  • zipadeedoodah Lehi, UT
    March 30, 2019 5:20 p.m.

    Not good timing. DN publishes one article about regent complaints on tuition hikes and this one at the same time. Let's see how many more ways these institutions can come up with to soak Utah taxpayers.

  • screenname Salt Lake City, UT
    March 30, 2019 10:07 a.m.

    Hmmmm, we're seeing fewer and fewer men entering college every year vs women... Does that mean that we should be giving men a higher preference in hiring at Utah universities?

  • DN Subscriber Cottonwood Heights, UT
    March 29, 2019 10:45 p.m.

    Regents- Please tell us who will be held accountable for "A 33-year-old Utah State Board of Regents policy on women and minorities in faculty and administrative positions that's been on the books but apparently never acted on..."

    What other 20-30 year old policies have been adopted but never acted on? Who is responsible for failing to carry out your policies?