Letter: We have bigger problems than immigration

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  • Freiheit Salt Lake City, UT
    March 8, 2019 6:40 a.m.

    Blue Devil: You left out Teddy Roosevelt's "gentlemen's agreement" that was meant to keep the Japanese out. You're absolutley correct in your assessment of US attitudes and actions, both legal and on a personal level, regarding immigrants. Unless they were WASP (white anglo saxon protestant) they were far from welcome, and even WASPs were viewed with suspicion.

  • UtahBlueDevil Alpine, UT
    March 7, 2019 3:08 p.m.

    ""But in the late 1800s the US decided it didn't want [A]sians coming to this nation, and the first real laws were passed to keep people out."

    You really don't believe that, do you? I would love to hear how you came to that conclusion."

    @barfolomew - Its really not all that hard to believe. Its a matter of knowing history. Please take some time to do some reading on Angell Treaty of 1880. Or to cut to the chase read about the Chinese Exclusion Act.... which revised the Burlingame-Seward agreement, the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 abrogated its free immigration clauses altogether.

    I would also read up on the Immigration Act of 1924 which was followed by Immigration Act of 1924.

    So yes, I really do believe that, because there are laws on the books that explicitly called for the exclusion of asians from immigration. I absolutely stand by my statement. Let me know what you find that says what I said isn't true.

  • barfolomew Tooele, UT
    March 7, 2019 12:16 p.m.

    @ Ultra Bob

    "Immigration is a business concern, it won’t solve the problems in America."

    You think that because you don't seem to understand the full impact of open borders. Or because that's what the left has conditioned you to think.

    Go ask any family who has lost a loved one to an illegal immigrant gang member, murderer or drunk driver if they feel this is a "business concern."

    Ask those who were close to the any of the tens of thousands of people who die every year from fentanyl and heroin overdoses if they feel this is a "business concern."

    Or maybe you could ask the 30% of women who are victims of sexual abuse or the 70% of migrants who experience violence on the trip through Mexico.

    Go ahead, ask them. I'll bet they have a different view on the subject.

    And, no, it won't solve all the problems in America. But then, what possibly could?

  • Ultra Bob Cottonwood Heights, UT
    March 7, 2019 11:55 a.m.

    Immigration is a business concern, it won’t solve the problems in America.

  • joe5 South Jordan, UT
    March 7, 2019 11:31 a.m.

    Hannah: So a small regional problem in Michigan is a bigger national issue than the huge Opiod epidemic that we have from drugs flooding through our southern border?

    So aging infrastructure is more of a crisis than the human trafficking in which we are complicit with our inability to protect our borders?

    So some other little trivial thing in your mind is more of a crisis than Americans being murdered (which included the brutal murder of someone I know personally) and victimized by illegals who cross our southern border over and over again with impunity?

    Are you really so blind that you cannot even grasp the pain and suffering of families that are suffering from drugs, rape, murder, child abductions, etc?

    It is insulting that you would talk about water in Flint, Michigan as being a greater crisis than what these families have suffered. I honestly hope your family never has to suffer such a thing or that you ever have to face someone who has suffered one or more of those experiences to explain to them why you think their pain is trivial and unimportant.

  • barfolomew Tooele, UT
    March 7, 2019 10:41 a.m.

    @ UtahBlueDevil

    "But in the late 1800s the US decided it didn't want [A]sians coming to this nation, and the first real laws were passed to keep people out."

    You really don't believe that, do you?

    I would love to hear how you came to that conclusion.

  • Redshirt1701 Deep Space 9, Ut
    March 7, 2019 8:55 a.m.

    What problems do we have that are bigger? Are we just to take their word on that?

  • UtahBlueDevil Alpine, UT
    March 7, 2019 5:58 a.m.

    "They came legally" because until the late 1800s and early 1900s the US didn't have laws discriminating against people by race or ethnic origin. But in the late 1800s the US decided it didn't want asians coming to this nation, and the first real laws were passed to keep people out. Largely our ancestors were not subject to discriminatory laws that current immigrants do. It is not an apples to apples comparison.

    But that doesn't mean the immigrants didn't face discriminatory behavior at those times. They absolutely did. The Irish were reviled. Polish, Italians... horrible treatment. Chinese, absolutely criminal. Jews....? So laws may have changed, but treatment of new arrivals, has not.

    And while I am an anti-Trumpist, I am not sure we really do have bigger issues than immigration. One of these issues is that a wall would be effective in slowing immigration and the flow of drugs across the border, it is a 8 billion dollar bandaid that doesn't address the real underlying issue. The fact that congress refuses to really address fair immigration is causing a deeper and deeper divide between neighbors - at that in its self is a crises that needs addressing.

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    March 6, 2019 8:10 p.m.

    "Most Americans are immigrants, so why should we push out people just like you and me? "

    Most American immigrants came by boat or plane, followed the law and immigrated legally. But, you're right, the wall is unnecessary.