Letter: Auto safety is becoming a real concern in Utah

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  • Whale of Fortune Salt Lake City, UT
    Feb. 16, 2019 10:01 a.m.

    "The solid data is very clear: Mandatory automobile safety inspections do not decrease automotive fatalities."

    Oh, there you go bringing facts into it. Safetyism depends on feelings, not facts.

  • ConservativeCommonTater Salt Lake City, UT
    Feb. 16, 2019 9:31 a.m.

    NoNamesAccepted - St. George, UT
    Feb. 15, 2019 5:38 p.m.
    "What we have here is a case of confirmation bias."

    I'VE NOTICED--and reported to either the driver or the police--cars and espeically trailers with equipment failures for decades. I'VE not noticed any higher number in the last year or two than in the decades before that.

    "The solid data is very clear: Mandatory automobile safety inspections do not decrease automoative fatalities."

    "That isn't ancedotal on my part or the author's part. "

    "I check my cars' lights, horn, wipers, etc on at least a monthly basis. My mechanic checks steering and brake components at least twice a year during my oil changes and tire rotations."

    What we have here is a case of confirmation bias on the part of "NoNamesAccepted." This letter was not about him, but he chose to make it about him.

    I could say that "bald tires do not cause accidents," it is bald men with tires that cause accidents. /s

  • No One Of Consequence Salt Lake City, UT
    Feb. 16, 2019 9:02 a.m.

    Suppose the car passed inspection with a note that the tires should be replaced soon, but the car owner disregards that advice and doesn't replace the tires he/she is forced to by the next year's inspection. Or the car slips on slick roads and there is a crash. Tell me how the inspection program made us safer in that case?

    Bald tires didn't cause the crash. The person driving the car with worn out tires caused the crash. It comes down to personal responsibility, with or without nanny-state policies that don't overcome poor judgement or poverty.

  • Steve C. Warren WEST VALLEY CITY, UT
    Feb. 16, 2019 8:56 a.m.

    Since mandatory safety inspections were eliminated, the number of traffic fatalities in Utah has declined.

  • utah chick MSC, UT
    Feb. 16, 2019 4:15 a.m.

    Precisely the reason I take the train.

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    Feb. 15, 2019 8:46 p.m.

    "one old man - MSC, UT
    Feb. 15, 2019 7:11 p.m.
    No one has ever really explained why the legislature made this move. It makes very little sense."

    Yep, and when that happens, you have to follow the money. Some people had to financially benefit from this policy.

  • one old man MSC, UT
    Feb. 15, 2019 7:11 p.m.

    No one has ever really explained why the legislature made this move. It makes very little sense.

    What is the real reason behind it?

  • NoNamesAccepted St. George, UT
    Feb. 15, 2019 5:38 p.m.

    What we have here is a case of confirmation bias.

    I've noticed--and reported to either the driver or the police--cars and espeically trailers with equipment failures for decades. I've not noticed any higher number in the last year or two than in the decades before that.

    The solid data is very clear: Mandatory automobile safety inspections do not decrease automoative fatalities.

    That data is from every State around Utah. So similar climates, similar demographics, similar everything. That isn't ancedotal on my part or the author's part. That is government gathered data.

    Those relative few who drive with equipment failures do so whether their car passes inspection or not. The majority who value our own lives, keep our cars in decent repair whether we are legally required to pass an inspection on a specific date or not.

    I check my cars' lights, horn, wipers, etc on at least a monthly basis. My mechanic checks steering and brake components at least twice a year during my oil changes and tire rotations.

    Now, if we could move to real-time automated smog testing on roadways, we'd save even more money while reducing pollution better than our current, annual test does.