Heavy beer might be on its way to Utah grocery, convenience stores

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  • Oh, please! Saint George, UT
    Feb. 3, 2019 10:11 a.m.

    Robin: My earlier comment said nothing about access to guns. It may surprise you that I believe in strict gun control, i.e. extensive background checks, registered firearms and the like. Your attempt to deflect away from the premise of the article is telling.

    "You can't have it both ways." What is that supposed to mean?

    I WANT to live in the safest society possible, where personal responsibility and common sense reign supreme. I DON'T want to pay (financially, emotionally, and physically) for the poor choices of others when they drink too much, harm me or loved ones and drive up the costs of health care, car insurance, and law enforcement.

    Why don't you want that, too?

  • Brave Sir Robin San Diego, CA
    Feb. 2, 2019 5:20 p.m.

    @oh please

    "All YOU have to do is examine the statistics state-wide or nation-wide to see the DIRECT impact drunkenness has on car accidents, domestics disputes, and a plethora of other situations to know that "drinking" is bad for society and health."

    Let me get this straight: You believe restricting access to alcohol will reduce drinking, but you don't believe restricting access to guns will reduce shootings?

    You can't have it both ways.

  • Oh, please! Saint George, UT
    Feb. 2, 2019 12:46 p.m.

    @Tater: All YOU have to do is examine the statistics state-wide or nation-wide to see the DIRECT impact drunkenness has on car accidents, domestics disputes, and a plethora of other situations to know that "drinking" is bad for society and health. Thousands of incidents and accidents annually are a direct result of idiots being drunk and trying to drive or act reasonably while inebriated. Many people are killed or maimed (physically and emotionally) by drunk drivers, drunk parents, and drunk partners.

    The millions of pounds of grain wasted on beer and liquor could be made into bread to feed millions throughout the world. There is NO good reason for anyone to drink beer or liquor.

    It has NOTHING to do with Mormons or any other religion. It has to do with "common" sense and personal responsibility.

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    Feb. 2, 2019 12:42 p.m.

    I know we live in Utahkistan where religious leaders believe that beer is evil. "Heavy beer" is a Utah term, one which the rest of the civilized world calls; "Beer". I have no desire to make up temple rules or church laws. Keep mormons out of the liquor business and the liquor law business. It's called "agency".

  • ConservativeCommonTater Salt Lake City, UT
    Feb. 2, 2019 9:52 a.m.

    "What in Tucket - Provo, UT
    Feb. 2, 2019 7:04 a.m.
    "There is no amount of an alcoholic drink that is beneficial to humans. Many articles will tell it is ok to have a glass of wine with your dinner, etc."

    We get it, you're Mormon and your church tells you how to think. Many of us don't care what your church says, since we aren't members. If YOU don't want to drink, don't! But, don't try to make decisions for others, you know, that "free agency" stuff...

    The brewers aren't going to care why Utah wants to retain 3.2% beer. Utah is such a small market that they aren't going out of their way to satisfy our Mormon Republican legislators.

    Utah can either sell real beer or face the loss of million$ in tax money. Utah loves tax money, so the outcome is pretty obvious.

  • What in Tucket Provo, UT
    Feb. 2, 2019 7:04 a.m.

    There is no amount of an alcoholic drink that is beneficial to humans. Many articles will tell it is ok to have a glass of wine with your dinner, etc. It is best to completely abstain from alcoholic drinks. You drink at your own risk. Even an occasional drink enhances a woman's likelihood of breast cancer. Obviously alcoholism is a serious disease, but even small amounts enhance many diseases.

  • IcemanCometh SALT LAKE CITY, UT
    Feb. 2, 2019 3:15 a.m.

    In the US, heavy beer is typically considered any beer over 4.0% ABV. Which is tied to prohibition era laws. Stevenson's bill would only raise the limit to 6.0% ABV which at this point is more like "regular" beer. So in reality regular beer might be on its way to Utah grocery, convenience stores. But with stronger beers still being sold in a monopolistic heavily taxed state store.