Oral-B dental floss linked to toxic chemicals, study suggests

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  • Shanprice67 ,
    Jan. 14, 2019 2:28 p.m.

    P&G has confirmed none of the substances in the report are used in our dental floss. This study interviewed people about their self-reported use of a wide array of consumer products and foods, it was not focused on dental floss alone. In fact they did not demonstrate a correlation with use of dental floss to an increased presence of any of the reported substances. Our dental floss undergoes thorough safety testing and we stand behind the safety of all our products. In the supplemental table in the study*, the dental floss data alone showed no correlation to these substances. It was only when trying to combine consumer products that they saw any correlations at all. Even the authors state €œGiven the numerous sources of PFAS in everyday diets and environments it is difficult to pinpoint which behaviors contribute most significantly to PFAS exposure.€ What did the study measure? None of the substances in the study were measured in dental floss. They only looked for a generic marker that can also be found in many other materials.

  • Shanprice67 ,
    Jan. 14, 2019 2:24 p.m.

    We have confirmed none of the substances in the report are used in our dental floss. This study interviewed people about their self-reported use of a wide array of consumer products and foods, it was not focused on dental floss alone. In fact they did not demonstrate a correlation with use of dental floss to an increased presence of any of the reported substances. Our dental floss undergoes thorough safety testing and we stand behind the safety of all our products.

    In the supplemental table in the study*, the dental floss data alone showed no correlation to these substances. It was only when trying to combine consumer products that they saw any correlations at all. Even the authors state “Given the numerous sources of PFAS in everyday diets and environments it is difficult to pinpoint which behaviors contribute most significantly to PFAS exposure.”


    What did the study measure? None of the substances in the study were measured in dental floss. They only looked for a generic marker that can also be found in many other materials.

  • FelisConcolor Layton, UT
    Jan. 14, 2019 2:18 p.m.

    When we discuss "fake news" we should also include the Media's habit of uncritically re-posting the latest press release from Left-wing advocacy groups without providing any scientific perspective to balance them out.

    The presence of any chemical in a consumer product, or the body, or the environment is completely irrelevant; the key question is the concentration or the dose. A principle which most environmentalist groups happily ignore.

    For example, everyone has some amount of the heavy metal lead in their bodies. EVERYONE. If you believe that there is "no safe level" of lead exposure, then it logically follows that everyone is suffering from some degree of lead poisoning -- a patently ridiculous assertion.

    The dose makes the poison. With a few exceptions, the presence of part-per-trillion or even part-per-billion concentrations of toxic chemicals in the environment has no effect on human health whatsoever. In the long run, not flossing your teeth will have far greater negative impact on your health than using Oral-B floss.

  • Z South Jordan, UT
    Jan. 14, 2019 12:41 p.m.

    I loved the conclusion of the study that the floss 'might' be exposing people. Not is, might. Sounds like someone with a preconceived notion and an axe to grind.

  • Gil Bates Mayfield, UT
    Jan. 14, 2019 11:50 a.m.

    Am I in heaven?

    Floss and lettuce are bad for you.

  • Susan Quinton Draper, UT
    Jan. 14, 2019 10:24 a.m.

    No surprise here. The majority of dental processes and products have no oversight or testing for long-term safety.

  • NeifyT Salt Lake City, UT
    Jan. 14, 2019 9:20 a.m.

    "The study tested 18 dental flosses, including three more Glide products, for fluorine. All three of those tested positive for the fluorine, which is an indicator of PFAS."

    They are really using a test for fluorine to "indicate" the presents of PFAS? Fluorine is found in all dental products the world around; from floss, toothpaste, everything used at a dentists office, even in drinking water. Fluorine is the base chemical found in all fluoride compounds. That seems like a poor test if PFAS if that one is bad but other fluoride compounds are not.