Patient groups ask court to invalidate Utah's medical marijuana compromise

Return To Article
Add a comment
  • ConradGurch Salt Lake City, Utah
    Dec. 10, 2018 1:40 p.m.

    @Sherpajames - West Jordan, UT

    So everyone who tries it will experience your same result?

  • Sherpajames West Jordan, UT
    Dec. 8, 2018 2:20 p.m.

    I smoked weed for years. Fun, yes but every morning before work I couldn’t remember what I needed to bring to complete the task for that days projects. So I made lists, they made life work. I skied three days a week high as a kite, fun again. But my skill level seemed to stay around good, but not where I wished it was.

    Surprisingly about one year after I stopped smoking weed I never needed to use lists, I could remember everything, every tiny detail of what I need to bring to work to complete projects. My skiing went through the roof. My body and mind worked better together I improved as a productive member of society, an avid skier at snowbird, a father and husband.

    Marijuana infects people, changes aditudes and the way people deal with each other. I have a lot friends that smoke marijuana and they seem to be forever caught in a small circle.

  • kolob1 Sandy, UT
    Dec. 8, 2018 9:54 a.m.

    laws or not, recreational use is happening and will continue to flourish. The US Government began in the 1700s and the LDS Church began in 1830. Marijuana smoking began 4000 years ago. Who do you think has more staying power?

  • kolob1 Sandy, UT
    Dec. 8, 2018 9:53 a.m.

    Recreational users of pot are 1000 % for medicinal use of pot. It was the recreational users of pot that alerted the medical community to the benefits of smoking pot, not the other way around. The medical community and especially the pharmas are only in it for the money they can make. Big business will not (can not) approach this issue as a caring health based effort in deference to an opportunity to make big bucks. Walmart and Walgreen will soon start home delivery services of 90 day supplies of prescription drugs. Utah is a top abuser in the United States of abusing prescription drugs. Do you get the picture. The victims are the voters that didn't get what they voted for. The scoundrels are the legislators who either through divine intervention or resolute conviction of the 90 day supply train coming to their homes detest the recreational user. These legislators are still stuck in a 60's time warp .

    In summary, laws or not, recreational use is happening and will continue to flourish. The US Government began in the 1700s and the LDS Church began in 1830. Marijuana smoking began 4000 years ago. Who do you think has more staying power?

  • not status quo Bountiful, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 7:18 p.m.

    classic bait and switch. is anyone surprised that a lawsuit has been filed?? How much is defending this lawsuit going to cost taxpayers??

  • dski HERRIMAN, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 3:10 p.m.

    What I have read, including educated critics of the compromised bill, the State can legally change public driven propositions like Prop 2. The Utah Constitution allows it. Also, the sure winners in this political wrestling will be Rocky Anderson and his attorneys. I wonder what their fees will be like.

  • JudgeDredd Eagle Mountain, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 1:30 p.m.

    Hmm... Seems like there's an ulterior motive here. An agenda hidden behind the scenes from those who manipulate laws in gaining the initial goal. Which ultimately will bring us to legalized recreational drug use, therefore losing the value of medicinal purposes.
    We're this >< close to it becoming fully recreational. Regardless how it swings, we'll get there soon enough, and already shooting ourselves in the foot.
    The drug has been so far up the schedule one, we haven't even had enough time to study the substance for its medicinal value. It all appears to have been rushed, the grammar alone is proof. There are some details that stand out like a black eye. Seriously! If there's any type of comprise, fix the grammar. Utah is pretty large geographically.
    This will in turn, cause the immediate purpose of growing the plant based on the limitation for dispensing it to those who need it. This initiative has a lot of mass, and momentum, and will not stop after this year is dead and gone.
    It's not rocket surgery. By way of vote, we've allowed ourselves to be shot in the foot from manipulation. Prove me wrong, please. I triple dog dare anyone legitimately, and sincerely.

  • Joe Ismail Sandy, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 11:48 a.m.

    Stop referring to this as a "compromise", that's absurd. This is a completely different law, something that will help a fraction of patients and disregards the entire intent of the law we voted on and passed Why would the winning side "compromise" with the losing side? That doesn't ever happen in anybithwr circumstance, so why now? If the law had failed, we wouldn't even be talking about this. The church completely overstepped its bounds. What happened was an illegal knife in the back to sick patients, all in the name of big pharma blood money. I've never been so ashamed of my state in my life. Thankfully this is proving to be a wakeup call, citizens are starting to realize our local state government has basically been completely taken over by outside influences, money is changing hands, and in the mean time the sick are being used as cannon fodder.

  • Ranch Here, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 11:43 a.m.

    @procuradorfiscal;

    "The same reason all thinking Utahns opposed it -- it's evil and will result in carnage, misery, and the decline of Utah society."

    -- No, the sky is NOT falling and you can crawl out from beneath your rock.

    @water rocket;

    "...since it was with the promise that prop 2 would be replaced with this compromise bill BEFORE the election that got it passed in the first place..."

    -- Wrong. Those of us who voted for it voted for it AS-IS - we opposed the churchislature's meddling from the very beginning. If that was why you voted for it, well, there's a sucker born ever second.

    "Those against ... want to liberalize the use "

    -- Stupid comment when ANYONE who wants it recreationally can ALREADY get it as easy as 1-2-3.

  • Ranch Here, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 11:36 a.m.

    "Broad community engagement ..."

    To be read as: "Pay no attention to the man behind the curtain."

  • taking a stand for truth Lehi, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 10:54 a.m.

    Just what is the complaint here? Those, like myself, who need marijuana medication will get it.

    The truth? Those against this initiative, if unveiled, want to liberalize the use to the extent we become like Colorado and other states where anyone can get it with few controls.

  • JWB Kaysville, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 9:02 a.m.

    Marijuana and OPIOIDS are both drugs and have a benefit for those that need to have doctors help manage pain and health. Neither were meant to be on the wholesale or retail market uncontrolled nor unmanaged.

    Doctors even made mistakes in how they prescribed OPIOIDS to their valid and valued patients. Some doctors even took advantage of the drug economy and made money at patient’s expense.

    Legally and medically prescribed doesn’t mean everyone, patients, doctors and distributors won’t become corrupt or conniving.

  • NEAD SLC, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 8:59 a.m.

    Thanks, @2bits. You're the only commenter who addressed the one question I had.

    I'd like to see a poll of Utah voters (both those who voted for and against Prop 2) to see what they think of the compromise *after being presented with a comprehensive list of changes*. I'm guessing the majority would be in favor of it.

    Seems like most commenting here against the compromise don't know what it does, and are reacting to characterizations made by people like Rocky Anderson, who seems more like he's ax grinding against the Church than advocating for patients.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 8:07 a.m.

    OK, I finally found an actual sick person who really really doesn't want the compromise. But after talking with her awhile to find out why... I found out she was misinformed on what was in the compromise bill. She thought it would make it so she couldn't get the medication she needs. I pointed out the 3 things it did...

    1. Can't grow your own marijuana
    2. Reduced number of privately-run dispensaries
    3. Required dispensaries to employ pharmacists to recommend dosages

    She had no problem with any of those.

    I asked why she was so against the compromise, she said friends (probably MJ Activists) told her it would gut the bill they voted on and make it so she couldn't get the meds she needs. But that's untrue.

    If anybody can show me how the compromise makes it so sick people can't get the medication they need... please show how it does that.

    Google "Utah Proposition 2, Medical Marijuana Initiative (2018) - BallotPedia
    Scroll down to the "Legislative alteration" section...
    and "Changes made by the bill" section...
    Read them. The changes are small and sensible

    Doesn't gut the bill, or make it so you can't get meds you need, like activists keep pretending.

  • John Pack Lambert of Michigan Ypsilanti, MI
    Dec. 7, 2018 8:04 a.m.

    This lawsuit is built on ignoring the actual timetable of events. Complex public policy should not be decided on a whim. The fact that the opponents did not put up more of a fight effected the outcome.

    At the same time some percentage of voters who voted in favor of Prop 2 did so because they wanted the compromise and felt an outright defeat of prop 2 would not move to a compromise.

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 7:59 a.m.

    Re: ". . . arguing that medical cannabis will lead directly to legal recreational use...is exactly what we’re hoping for."

    At last! An honest "medical" weed proponent.

    He/she honestly states what all other "medical" weed proponents studiously try to hide -- this "medical" weed bill is about nothing more than enabling and profiting from recreational use.

    It is not -- has never been -- about compassion, relief of the sick, miracle cures, or any of the assorted bunk used to sell the idea to a credulous, unsophisticated public that was taken in by a well-funded but venal and disingenuous campaign by out-of-state blood-money interests.

    Kudos for your honesty, though not for your short-sighted foolishness.

  • kolob1 Sandy, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 7:44 a.m.

    There arethree ways in the United States to get justice. The legislature, the courts and then the streets. I prefer the later.

  • Copybook Headings Draper, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 5:15 a.m.

    The only way this law is going to get changed (so it actually reflects the will of the majority) is if and when enough legislator's prospects for reelection are threatened. It's as simple as that. Nothing scares a politician more than the thought of having to, you know, actually work for a living. Enough people voted yes on this proposition. Now enough people have show up next time to vote against the lawmakers who voted yes on the amendment. That's what I'm going to do; even if it means holding my nose and voting for a Democrat.

  • Sativa Saint , 00
    Dec. 7, 2018 4:34 a.m.

    It matters not what the opponents of this most beautiful plant say. Your fear and paranoia towards Cannabis is comical. People don’t need to drive across state borders to ‘get their fix’ (eye roll). Folks, recreational ‘weed’ has been readily available...forever, so arguing that medical cannabis will lead directly to legal recreational use...is exactly what we’re hoping for. Free the Weed!!!

  • zgomer Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 7, 2018 2:51 a.m.

    Votes don't count in Utah, welcome to the twilight zone.

  • NoNamesAccepted St. George, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 8:37 p.m.

    @Prometheus Platypus: "So why do the losers or opponents get to redraft prop 2 without any input from those who proposed it?"

    Why did the losers get to overturn the constitutional definition of marriage in 31 States (over three-fifths, and almost enough to amend the federal constitution)? And most of those passed with far wider margins than did Prop 2.

    Should Utah pass and enforce State laws that conflict with federal laws in any area other than marijuana cultivation, sales, possession, and use? Perhaps you'd like Utah to ignore federal law when it comes to land use policy, restrictions on certain guns and ammo, EPA regulations, marriage, or other areas?

    Fact is, legislators are elected by the same voters who passed Prop 2 by a thin margin. Most legislators won by much wider margins than did Prop 2.

    Prop 2 is simple legislation subject to amending or repeal like any other law. Many who voted for it did so only after the legislature announced it would fix the problems in Prop 2 that effectively legalize recreational use of pot.

    There were supporters of Prop 2 who worked on the fix. And any organization representing 60% of our population is entitled to a seat at the table.

  • 1covey Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 6:30 p.m.

    Some of these comments ignore the fact that our state legislators are voted into office by the citizens of our state. The legislature is supposed to pass laws, including changes to laws. That is their main job. Patient advocacy groups - which patients ?

  • uterebel50 Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 6:19 p.m.

    To those posting that marijuana is against federal law, get real. We live in Utah, and the compound constitutional republic of Utah is exempt from federal law. Just ask any Utah Republican office holder.

  • Roadside Philosopher Fayette, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 5:55 p.m.

    So much volatility over something that is not as bad as alcohol? Rule it like that. No use while driving etc. How one little plant has been labeled as evil when components of all sorts of plants have been used for medication and self medication. This is fear based and money control. It took just a couple of years to OK opioids? Yet we keep complaining there is not enough science out there on mj? Really people it has been decades!

  • NoNamesAccepted St. George, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 5:19 p.m.

    @Impartial7: "Better take it to appeals to get a court out of state and away from the reach of Utah influences."

    So how do you figure a federal court is likely to rule on any law--initiative passed or legislature passed--that conflicts with federal law? Or does the Supremacy Clause only apply to federal laws and court rulings the left likes?

    Should Utah pass laws that conflict with federal law on issues like the definition of marriage, access to elective abortions, or access to and use of federal lands within the State of Utah? Should we refuse to respect EPA rules or federal gun laws?

    If not, then on what consistent basis can anyone ask a federal court to uphold any State law allowing what federal prohibits regarding marijuana? And both parties are to blame for not changing federal law.

    Step away from hopes for outcome based judicial activism and the case is less than weak. Citizen initiatives in Utah create simple legislation. All legislation is subject to amending or repealing by future legislation. No open meeting laws were violated. We might just as well sue every time the State changes tax code or speed limits as think this case has any real legs.

  • Chessermesser West Valley City, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 4:47 p.m.

    The elephant in the room is Prop. 2 would effectively allow uncontrolled distribution of MJ, in effect legalizing it. This law corrects the problem.

  • one vote Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 4:28 p.m.

    The effective repeal by the over controlling legislature will be overturned in Court. Otherwise votes in Utah do not count.

  • Walt Nicholes Orem, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 4:17 p.m.

    There is a lot of hand wringing about the actions of the legislature. I completely understand that. I think a better approach would have been for the legislature to explain, before passing the "compromise" why it was really necessary. Instead the attitude seemed to be "we have to stop this before it goes into effect."

    But there is a simple solution: For those who voted for the proposition (and I am one of them) we simply vote against the reelection of legislators who voted for the "compromise." If there really are 60 some-odd percent of Utahans who favored the proposition in the form in which it was passed, there should be enough to reform the membership of the legislature.

  • ConradGurch Salt Lake City, Utah
    Dec. 6, 2018 4:02 p.m.

    @The Rock - Federal Way, WA

    Yes, MJ is illegal under Federal Law. Federal Law does not want to be the enforcer. It was written to have the States govern.

    In my humble opinion the Federal Government needs to quit sitting on its pockets on this one.

    All they've done on this is give us a blind eye and a deaf ear.

  • Confused Sandy, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 3:43 p.m.

    Prometheus Platypus - "So why do the losers or opponents get to redraft prop 2 without any input from those who proposed it?"

    Actually, the bill that was debated in the legislature was written with several groups (Libertas Institute being the main one) that supported Prop 2, State and local officials, UMA. The LDS church was part of the discussion.

    Libertas saw the flaws in Prop 2, worked with several groups to close loopholes and possible problems down the road.

    FYI - The Utah State Legislature may amend any initiated statute by a simple majority vote. When presented with an indirect initiative, the Legislature may make technical corrections to the proposed law. Utah Code, Title 20A, Chapter 7, Section 208 and Section 212

    That gives them the right to change Prop 2...

  • water rocket Magna, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 3:42 p.m.

    If you are going to invalidate the promised compromise bill, then you need to invalidate the election results, since it was with the promise that prop 2 would be replaced with this compromise bill BEFORE the election that got it passed in the first place. Some radicals simply want every thing their way, and some just want to stick it to the church when they can get a chance.

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 3:29 p.m.

    Re: "The removal of auto-immune illnesses has no basis."

    Yeah -- no basis other than the unassailable fact that weed has no effect on autoimmune disorders. So, those suffering from autoimmune disorders would not only not be helped at all, but would be harmed by toquing weed, thinking it can somehow benefit them -- perhaps even foregoing real treatment for weed.

    That, and the fact that many autoimmune disorders can only be accurately diagnosed by autopsy -- things like fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, and other strains of yuppie flu. This, then, would add another phony "disorder" -- things like cachexia and chronic pain, that can only be "diagnosed" by asking the "patient" a few questions, and can't be clinically excluded -- to the list of "diagnoses" permitting what amounts to a lifetime of recreational use.

    Weed doesn't cure or ameliorate anything any better than aspirin or ibuprofen. It's much more subject to serious abuse, and much more dangerous to both the user and those surrounding him.

    The real problem is the removal doesn't go far enough. ALL diseases should be removed until science -- not economics -- says weed could help.

  • jjjdsd Centerville, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 3:25 p.m.

    My understanding is some times the legislature goofs when creating a law. They then go back in and legislatively correct any errors.

    The logic of Rocky would be once the legislature passed a error they could not ever go back and legislatively correct the error.

    If the state government invalidated the voting for the prop 2 that would be an issue. But, correcting it does not invalidate it. The legislature could pass a law to follow federal law and the prop 2 people would be completely out and it would still be a legal act the courts could not overturn.

    By the way, if people are going across state lines to get their fix, don't drive back. Our children and our families are more important than your high, impaired driving.

  • RRB SLC, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 2:55 p.m.

    The removal of auto-immune illnesses has no basis. It needs to be re-instated in the bill. There is no reason people with lupus etc. should need to jump through hoops, go before a board, when others just need to ask for a prescription. Please do a little reading about systemic lupus.

  • Prometheus Platypus Orem, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 2:39 p.m.

    So why do the losers or opponents get to redraft prop 2 without any input from those who proposed it?

    Why does the church have any say in the legislation they opposed especially behind closed doors, or secret combinations?

    This is the equivalent of a non-member getting to decide church doctrine.

    2bits said: According to Ballotopidia the compromise-bill changed 3 things:
    1. Removed the provision allowing patients to grow their own marijuana;
    2. Reduced the number of privately-run dispensaries allowed;
    3. Required dispensaries to employ pharmacists to recommend dosages
    What's so bad about that?

    Number 3 will tie it up in courts for years.

    To those opposed don't use it continue to support addictive opiates and the countries who supply America with them.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 2:26 p.m.

    Wait... I thought Compromise was a good thing...

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 2:05 p.m.

    Re: ". . . why would the church spokesperson still tell members to oppose [Prop 2]? "

    The same reason all thinking Utahns opposed it -- it's evil and will result in carnage, misery, and the decline of Utah society.

    Real Utah only hopes the dupes wake up quick enough to repeal this venal debacle and avoid converting Utah into San Francisco, Portland, Phoenix, or Seattle.

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 2:01 p.m.

    @LDSRealityCheck247;
    " If the compromise was going to be implemented either way the vote went, then why would the church spokesperson still tell members to oppose it?
    That does NOT make sense."

    Because Prop 2 caught the church and the Legislature by surprise. They weren't in a position to control and profit from a free market solution. This "compromise" allows them to set up and steer production, distribution, sales and profit to the typical power players.

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 2:00 p.m.

    Patient groups ask court to invalidate Utah's medical marijuana compromise, enforce Proposition 2.

    And so they should. No compromise necessary.

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 2:00 p.m.

    Re: " A pair of patient advocacy groups are suing to invalidate the medical marijuana compromise bill . . . represented by attorney and former Salt Lake City Mayor Rocky Anderson."

    Yeah, that pretty much says it all.

    In other words, the bought-and-paid-for surrogates of Weed, Inc. are upset that some slight modicum of control over recreational use will get in the way of their blood-money profits.

    Sad.

  • kaysvillecougar KAYSVILLE, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 1:48 p.m.

    @ Mr. smart guy,
    Ballot initiatives are a terrible way to create laws. So now the hard work comes and thank goodness for the governor and legislature for making common sense changes. It's apparent thought that the cheech and chong crowd who loves to smoke pot, is very disappointed. I hope they get used to disappointment.

  • LDSRealityCheck247 Herriman, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 1:27 p.m.

    What doesn’t make sense is that the LDS Church opposed Prop 2 with Marty Stephens even invoking obedience to the church to vote “no” on the proposition. If the compromise was going to be implemented either way the vote went, then why would the church spokesperson still tell members to oppose it?

    That does NOT make sense.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 1:17 p.m.

    Hmmm... only 1 comment so far that's against compromise who doesn't have a location outside of Utah.

    Who's driving this campaign? Utahns, our outsiders?

  • Den Den West Jordan, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 1:17 p.m.

    Of course they want the original proposition to be enforced...this is the way all other states, who have legalized it for recreational use, got their way. This won't happen now with this compromise. Nice try!

  • Exercise4Health Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 1:10 p.m.

    These so-called patient advocacy groups need to be honest. The legislature is doing its best to come up with policies that protect patients who would benefit from CBD, but also minimize the potential for abuse of the system and recreational use.

    Honesty from the "advocacy groups" dictates that they simply tell the truth: "I have a headache so I should be able to smoke weed." An exaggeration, admittedly, but I'm sure most readers will get my point.

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 1:02 p.m.

    Better take it to appeals to get a court out of state and away from the reach of Utah influences. Let the waste of taxpayer dollars begin.

  • 2 bits Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 12:58 p.m.

    RE: "Patient groups ask"...
    ---
    Come on patient-groups. You're starting to sound more like Marijuana-activists than groups of patients.

    The compromise gives you everything a patient needs, and just protects the public more from illicit marijuana.

    Who's doing the asking here... Marijuana-activists, or actual patients?

    Name one medication prohibited by the compromise bill.

    I mean is requiring dispensaries to employ a pharmacist to recommend dosages a bad thing?

    According to Ballotopidia the compromise-bill changed 3 things:
    1. Removed the provision allowing patients to grow their own marijuana;
    2. Reduced the number of privately-run dispensaries allowed;
    3. Required dispensaries to employ pharmacists to recommend dosages

    What's so bad about that?

    Are any patients really upset about the changes? The Marijuana-activists in the group are more upset than the actual patients.

  • Kralon HUNTINGTON BEACH, CA
    Dec. 6, 2018 12:48 p.m.

    The "compromise" really doesn't matter that much as referendums and legislation rarely get implemented as they were originally intended. With it still being against Federal law there is much that will change with any bill of this type.

    Just get it in place now for those who really need it and changes can always be made in the future to correct the always present errors.

  • water rocket Magna, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 12:42 p.m.

    Many people voted for prop 2 with the promise that it would be replaced with a better compromise bill, with the hope that it would benefit sick people. To change that now would prove the prop 2 to be a Trojan horse, and the promises made by ALL parties to replace it were dishonest. They agreed to the compromise before the election and now retract their support, in hopes of expanding marijuana use. If you want to use marijuana for recreational use, go to Colorado or Nevada, but please stop trying to force its use (and consequences) on the rest of us.

  • The Rock Federal Way, WA
    Dec. 6, 2018 12:35 p.m.

    Regardless of what Prop 2 states, it is still against US Law, and Federal Law supersedes state law.

    Just ask the Federal Government to enforce Federal Law with respect to Cannabis in the State of Utah. Problem solved.

  • imsmarterthanyou Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 12:35 p.m.

    All the compromise bill does is make marijuana so difficult for anyone to get that it will basically guarantee that the illegal drug dealers in Utah and the recreational pot stores in colorado and nevada continue to run thriving businesses.

  • imsmarterthanyou Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 12:28 p.m.

    Good, I hope the court upholds the will of the voters. But it wouldn't be the first time that a handful of politicians & judges have decided that the people who vote don't matter.

  • Wyomex Burlington, WY
    Dec. 6, 2018 12:26 p.m.

    Veto the vote.

    Governor Herbert’s call for a special legislative session and the ensuing “compromise” legislation in the aftermath of Proposition 2's passage effectively vetoed the electorate and their vote.

    Sort of like benevolent dictator who says “The unwashed masses really didn’t know what they voted for. This will be better for them.”

    Voters, beware the claim that your vote counts. It only counts if it aligns with the Powers that Be.

  • Bigger Bubba Herriman, UT
    Dec. 6, 2018 12:17 p.m.

    Just goes to show that for many people Prop 2 is all about recreational use.