BYU students impress India VIP with commitment to honor code

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  • geekusprimus Little Elm, TX
    Sept. 13, 2018 6:29 p.m.

    SeanKM,

    I keep hearing this "housing monopoly" stuff, but my experience has been otherwise. Overpriced housing with negligent management occurs in practically every college town. The average rent for an apartment in my hometown (which has two large public universities in it and usually has a lower cost of living than Utah) is closer to $500 per person. Also, if it were the contracted housing rules that were responsible for the inflated prices and lousy conditions of apartments around here, married housing would be relatively inexpensive in Provo, which it is most certainly not. In fact, if a student is willing to be a little bit bold, the off-campus contracted housing rules are the best tools a student has for protecting themselves against the infamous Provo housing "slumlords" because of the ability for the student to report housing violations to the off-campus housing office.

  • John Pack Lambert of Michigan Ypsilanti, MI
    Sept. 13, 2018 3:59 p.m.

    The vast majority of BUT students follow the honor code and do so willingly and with enthusiasm. It is nice to see a focus on the majority who do so with gladness instead of the malcontents who are unappreciative of the high quality low cost education they get there.

  • slackoff green river, WY
    Sept. 13, 2018 1:48 p.m.

    Haters gonna hate

  • NoNamesAccepted St. George, UT
    Sept. 13, 2018 12:40 p.m.

    @SeanKM:

    Every college and most employers today has various codes of conduct. Pick your poison.

    BYU chooses to not only require adherence to the standards of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, but to build some fences a ways back from the edge of those standards. This includes areas of modesty, morality, and honesty.

    Other schools enforce speech codes that treat students like children who are unable to deal with an idea they might find offensive or hurtful. In practice, these speech codes almost always limit right-wing ideas while promoting left-wing ideas.

    Beyond honor or speech codes, every school has a culture. BYU's culture is certainly not perfect, and is not even desirable for everyone. But neither is the culture at any other school perfect.

    A kid with a private room can tolerate or ignore a lot of otherwise offensive stuff. But if she is sharing a room with a roommate, or a suite (bathroom) with several roommates, she might decide the honor code is a lot nicer than dealing with overnight, inebriated male guests in her room when she'd rather feel comfortable and secure sleeping soundly in her own bed.

    As I said, pick your poison.

  • hbeckett Colfax, CA
    Sept. 13, 2018 12:34 p.m.

    just what is wrong with keeping to your pledge to observe specified behavioral standards isn't your word your bond

  • NoNamesAccepted St. George, UT
    Sept. 13, 2018 12:24 p.m.

    @Freiheit: "If this is true, then why have the code and an office to enforce it? Wouldn't the students act in a proper manner simply because that was their choice?"

    The vast majority clearly would as evidenced by the relatively low rate of offenses handled by the honor code office. But there is a social version of Gresham's law in economics: "Bad money drives out good."

    In social terms, "Bad manners drive out good manners."

    100 well behaved, polite people can be driven from a public space by one person who is allowed to behave rudely. In like manner, the culture of a campus can be disproportionately eroded by a small minority of people who are allowed to behave in ways damaging to the majority.

    Beyond this, having rules in place gives the majority an objective standard to live up to. It sets an agreed upon standard rather than leaving it to 20,000 individuals to individually decide what standards should be.

    As another analogy, the vast majority of people are peaceable, law-abiding, and decent. We have laws to punish the minority who are not, and to hold the rest of us to account when we might want to take an exception. Your schedule does not justify 45 mph in a school zone.

  • Freiheit Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 13, 2018 10:33 a.m.

    "BYU students follow the Honor Code because of their commitment to the Code's foundation. Adherence is not because of imposed restrictions by the university. Honor codes are only successful if they are from the bottom up and not from the top down."

    If this is true, then why have the code and an office to enforce it? Wouldn't the students act in a proper manner simply because that was their choice?

  • SeanKM Highland, UT
    Sept. 13, 2018 9:30 a.m.

    Well of course if he asks people if they follow it, they'll say yes. Expulsion follows if they don't and are found out.

    The Honor Code is good in idea, but not very good in practice. It makes students feel guilty for things that aren't sins, first of all, and adds unnecessary stress to their lives. It treats them as children, because the school apparently doesn't trust them to do what they say. For a school that apparently honors agency, this one doesn't.

    Another downside to it is how it allows residences to exploit the students. Off-campus housing has to adhere to BYU's standards, and therefore, only a few companies even bother dealing with it, creating a housing monopoly that ends up with all the students getting shafted every year.

    I'm glad for the time I had at BYU. But I'll never recommend my children to go; in fact I'll probably do the opposite.

  • Cougarista Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 13, 2018 8:36 a.m.

    Mr. Karad has discovered the secret. BYU students follow the Honor Code because of their commitment to the Code's foundation. Adherence is not because of imposed restrictions by the university. Honor codes are only successful if they are from the bottom up and not from the top down.