There were reportedly 4 earthquakes near the University of Utah last week

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  • Real Ute Dallas, TX
    Sept. 11, 2018 2:58 p.m.

    @ Impartial7,

    That professor came from Penn State and was a very serious person. The thing he explained was that the Wasatch Front is sitting on an ancient, fragile Bonneville Lake bed. He stated that EVERYTHING located west of 13th east in SLC would be liquified instantaneously when a 7.0 earthquake hit.......and then the gas explosions would get almost everyone......

    Yeah, the "latter days" are near sir.......

  • NeifyT Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 2:33 p.m.

    @shamrock,

    The wiki also said "1.0 - 1.9" ... 1.9 is 22+ times stronger than a 1.0. I could see someone maybe feeling a 1.9 if they were right on top of the fault in question. But a 1, I just don't see it... oh and the article mentioned 0.7; a 1 is nearly 3 times stronger than 0.7; making a 1.9 on the scale 63 time stronger than the 0.7.

    Again, I highly doubt anyone "felt" these earth quakes. And again, these happen even on the faults all along the Wasatch front very commonly. Many many times per year. And they don't normally make the news. The U of U has a seismograph going constantly; and if you look them up; you will see these "quakes" are just normal activity year-round (at least last time I looked them up when there was a 3.x up near Bear Lake a few years back).

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 2:20 p.m.

    @Real Ute;
    "."When the real earthquake hits Utah, it is all over. There is a river that runs under the SL Temple that is larger than the Columbia River. There will be massive gas explosions, most people will die. It is imminent."

    Then those will be the actual "Latter Days" for many.

  • shamrock Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 1:54 p.m.

    @Neify: Your own comment explains the phenomenon. You wrote: "I would really be surprised if anyone actually 'felt' [a 1.0 earthquake]. ... On wiki I get this: '1.0–1.9 Micro I Microearthquakes, not felt, or felt rarely'."

    "Rarely" does not mean "never."

  • Real Ute Dallas, TX
    Sept. 11, 2018 1:44 p.m.

    Back in 1981, I was a freshman at the U and my geology 101 professor was hired by the LDS Corporation to move to Utah to evaluate the Wasatch Fault. This man was so smart.......he said......"When the real earthquake hits Utah, it is all over. There is a river that runs under the SL Temple that is larger than the Columbia River. There will be massive gas explosions, most people will die. It is imminent." We don't know when, but it will happen sooner than later.

  • NeifyT Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 1:31 p.m.

    A 1.0 on the Richter Scale?

    I would really be surprised if anyone actually "felt" it. Maybe heard it and wondered what it was; but "felt" -- General and "earthquake" needs to be 2+ before it is feelable to humans living right next to the epicenter. Most people don't even feel earthquakes unless they hit 3+

    On wiki I get this:

    "1.0–1.9 Micro I Microearthquakes, not felt, or felt rarely. Recorded by seismographs. Continual/several million per year
    2.0–2.9 Minor I to II Felt slightly by some people. No damage to buildings. Over one million per year
    3.0–3.9 III to IV Often felt by people, but very rarely causes damage. Shaking of indoor objects can be noticeable. Over 100,000 per year "

    Without getting into the math; the numbers are not linear at all. That is a 3 is not 3 times more powerful; but rather a 3 on the scale is 1000 times more powerful than a 1. So a 1 is not even newsworthy; happens all the time.

  • Hubble65 Sandy, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 1:04 p.m.

    Foreshocks? Often prior to a major earthquake foreshocks are very common. Then again, only 6% of major quakes have a foreshock event but you never know. 7.0 at the U could be in the cards . . . or not.

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 11:57 a.m.

    Yeah. The Wasatch Front is in an earthquake prone area. But, hey, lets let Energy Solutions store radioactive waste here. What could go wrong?