Fight over Cottonwood Mall project headed to Utah Supreme Court

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  • Z South Jordan, UT
    Sept. 12, 2018 11:53 a.m.

    Utah is currently in a housing crisis, with prices being forced higher and higher due to a lack of available units. It is clear that we are running out of clear land to build on, and that higher densities are required to house everyone that wants to live here. This 'NIMBY' attitude is misplaced, and it is time to start realizing that higher density is in the future for this valley.

  • Wyo_Jake Casper, WY
    Sept. 11, 2018 12:18 p.m.

    How about making the area a greenbelt?

  • NEAD SLC, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 11:47 a.m.

    Preventing higher-density development increases housing prices, degrades our air quality, and prevents our communities from evolving. Those who fight high density housing should be forced to sit through an economics lecture about how their inconvenience chokes poor families out of affordable housing and chokes the rest of us who breathe the air in the valley.

    I agree with Thunderbolt, though; there should be a park with a playground in the development, and no public entity should subsidize this development.

  • Flipphone Sandy, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 11:23 a.m.

    Should just leave this vacant lot a field of weeds.

  • Nacho Libre Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 11:13 a.m.

    Correction to my previous comment:

    Ivory/Woodbury statement: "Their (UT Supreme Court) decision will establish important precedent and impact property rights and the ability of mayors and city councils to carefully administer the long-term planning of their cities."

    That's exactly why Holladay residents want this referendum—we don't feel like our mayor and city council are carefully administering the long-term planning of our city. They're selling us out for a project that isn't right for our city. Thousands of fellow Holladay residents disagree with how this development is moving forward. Ivory/Woodbury are trying to ram this through because there are millions of dollars at stake for them in the short-term (10 years) while we have to deal with the long-term (40+ years) consequences of a poorly planned and overcrowded development.

    Let us vote. And please, Ivory/Woodbury, take down that condescending "Thank You" banner you hung on the old Macy's building. It's insulting, and it only proves how out of touch you are on this issue.

  • thunderbolt7 Dutch John, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 7:11 a.m.

    2 reasons I signed the petition: 1- I object to tax subsidies to the wealthiest developers in Utah, and 2- There is no playground in the 57 acres proposed for high density housing. I have no objection to high density housing nor 90' high buildings. Bit. could the developers forego their rapacious inclination and set aside 1/4 acre for a public park with a swing set?

  • Nacho Libre Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 11, 2018 12:09 a.m.

    Ivory/Woodbury statement: "Their (UT Supreme Court) decision will establish important precedent and impact property rights and the ability of mayors and city councils to carefully administer the long-term planning of their cities."

    That's exactly why Holladay residents want this referendum—we don't feel like our mayor and city council are carefully administering the long-term planning of our city. They're selling us out for a project that isn't right for our city. Thousands of fellow Holladay residents disagree with how this development is moving forward. Ivory/Woodbury are trying to ram this through because there are millions of dollars at stake for them in the short-term (40 years) consequences of a poorly planned and overcrowded development. Let us vote. And please, Ivory/Woodbury, take down that condescending "Thank You" banner you hung on the old Macy's building. It's insulting, and it only proves how out of touch you are on this issue.

  • Fullypresent Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 10, 2018 10:36 p.m.

    In that particular location, it doesn't seem anything should be 7 stories whether that is businesses or housing. They need to think about what businesses could be sustained long-term and look more at homes, townhouses, and condos.