Some staunch advocates of Utah medical marijuana initiative have change of heart

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  • sgrox Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 30, 2018 4:38 p.m.

    The group they assembled to oppose Prop 2 is a very powerful group. But, not powerful enough to come up with their own solution. This has been a topic of discussion for years, but the legislature just sits on its hands. With no action by the legislature (nor this group of power-brokers) Prop 2 emerges based on the initiative structure. Only then do they mobilize to exert their power to oppose this solution with no alternative solution to offer.

    If Prop 2 isn't the right approach, then do SOMETHING. We're waiting........STILL.

  • Taterhead West Jordan, UT
    Aug. 25, 2018 8:06 a.m.

    I'm happy to see the church finally admit they support medical cannabis.

    Now, we can pass Prop 2 and make the minor tweaks it needs in the upcoming session of the legislature.

    But prescribe cannabis and sell from a pharmacy? Those are beyond the control of the state... both are against federal law, and waiting for that to change would mean Utahans would be dying.
    I'm voting for Prop 2.

  • Jeremiah Flanksteak Sandy, UT
    Aug. 25, 2018 7:18 a.m.

    Legalize it for recreational use!

  • Taterhead West Jordan, UT
    Aug. 25, 2018 7:13 a.m.

    I'm in a position to know about some things mentioned in this article.
    Todd Moon did NOT write one of the first drafts. He wrote a document, but it wasnt even looked at by those that wrote the actual Prop 2.
    Notice all three advocates, Enedina, Nathan and Todd... all use cannabis in forms that are currently illegal in Utah. They are breaking the law while telling other patients to wait until this coalition comes up with something. That's so unfair to the thousands of other patients who have been waiting.
    And like Melissa mentioned, they've had plenty of time to come up with something. Now, there's this mad push because patients did what legislators couldn't...?

  • 65TossPowerTrap Salmon, ID
    Aug. 24, 2018 2:38 p.m.

    As the parent of 5 grown children, I can assure you that kids will get pot if they want it, whether it is legal or not. So keeping it illegal doesn't make it go away. I can also tell you that cops doesn't enforce the law for minor use.

  • Robert Kuesterman West Valley City, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 12:31 p.m.

    If the initiative passes, the Legislature will modify it, as it did when voters approved an initiative on seizing property of suspected-but-never-charged drug dealers.

    If the initiative fails, the Legislature may well decide the issue needs more research, and once again it will do nothing.

    If you approve of medical marijuana but don't like how the initiative is written, you should still vote for it because legislators are certain to impose restrictions.

  • Farmington Fan Farmington, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 11:31 a.m.

    I've never been an advocate for the recreational use of marijuana and never will be. My position on the legalization of marijuana for all uses is "why legalize another substance that can be abused and can cause many ills in society, just because it is allegedly 'no worse than alcohol' "?

    Yet, marijuana is a drug, and its potential use as a medicine should not be ignored simply because it has been abused as an illegal drug for many years. It reasonably appears to have many great medical applications, and would reasonably appear to be able to treat many medical conditions in a way superior to other drugs currently used to treat those same medical conditions, with fewer side effects.

    Our legislature can't seem to look past the stigma that has been attached to marijuana since the 60's in order to make available it as a medicine to those in Utah who could really use its medicinal benefits.

    Even our current law recognizes that illegal use of marijuana is not as serious as illegal use of other drugs.

    Let's legalize marijuana for medical use and start doing research to discover all of its beneficial uses--and to determine which uses and which level of usage should not be allowed.

  • jjjdsd CENTERVILLE, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 11:10 a.m.

    There is a way for disgruntled church members to keep from getting a Church e-mail.

    First don't give the Church your e-mail address.

    Second, remove your name from the Church's rolls.

    If your truly upset about the Church taking a position, then don't be a part of it. If you continue your membership and complain about it, your being a hypocrite.

  • Fitness Freak Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:52 a.m.

    My Church can do their best to teach me the right things to do - but they absolutely have no right to try to tell me how to vote.

    I am blessed with the ability to make my OWN decisions. NOT the decisions for other people. THAT is what it means to live in the land of the free, and the home of the brave.

    I want government to tell me LESS regarding what I can, and can't do - NOT more.

    I have absolutely no desire to use marijuana, legal or otherwise, but I freely, and openly DEFEND other people's right to make their own decisions regarding its' use.

    The "Church" is attempting to influence the thoughts and actions of others, which they have a right to do, but I will support peoples right to free agency over the church's wishes.

  • Susan Quinton Draper, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:46 a.m.

    FractalTheorem- those studies, and more, have already been done. We have more than 50 years of proof, research, studies, anecdotal and double-blind, worldwide and nationwide. Many of us in the medical community are comfortable with the cannabis, more so than watching the deaths rise from opioids and “rush” approved drugs from the FDA. The fear-based propaganda from this coalition is yet another way to attempt to stop our votes in November. There are some doctors on the no side, as usual, but listen to the rest of us, and more so to the actual patients who need this.

  • Farmington Fan Farmington, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:46 a.m.

    If the Utah legislature doesn't like the initiative, why doesn't it call an emergency session to propose and pass a law it thinks would serve Utahns better, rather than to just give more lip service to the issue, with the true intent of doing nothing more about it for another 5-10 years.

    We've been hearing lip service by the Utah legislature about the necessity of legalizing marijuana for medical uses for 5-10 years, but up to this point in time the only use of marijuana that has been legalized by the Utah legislature is the use of CBD oil by a very narrow group of people--only those who suffer from seizures for which no other medication has been successful. At least make CBD oil legal to treat more conditions, such as anxiety--especially in light of recent disclosures that certain big pharma drugs that are prescribed to treat anxiety are highly addictive.

    When the legislature fails or refuses to do something the people want and need, the initiative process is the way to get that thing done. Without this initiative passing or coming close to passing, I have no faith that the Utah legislature will ever do anything about this issue. That's why I'm voting for the initiative.

  • Farmington Fan Farmington, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:45 a.m.

    If the Utah legislature doesn't like the initiative, why doesn't it call an emergency session to propose and pass a law it thinks would serve Utahns better, rather than to just give more lip service to the issue, with the true intent of doing nothing more about it for another 5-10 years.

    We've been hearing lip service by the Utah legislature about the necessity of legalizing marijuana for medical uses for 5-10 years, but up to this point in time the only use of marijuana that has been legalized by the Utah legislature is the use of CBD oil by a very narrow group of people--only those who suffer from seizures for which no other medication has been successful. At least make CBD oil legal to treat more conditions, such as anxiety--especially in light of recent disclosures that certain big pharma drugs that are prescribed to treat anxiety are highly addictive.

    When the legislature fails or refuses to do something the people want and need, the initiative process is the way to get that thing done. Without this initiative passing or coming close to passing, I have no faith that the Utah legislature will ever do anything about this issue. That's why I'm voting for the initiative.

  • Farmington Fan Farmington, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:45 a.m.

    If the Utah legislature doesn't like the initiative, why doesn't it call an emergency session to propose and pass a law it thinks would serve Utahns better, rather than to just give more lip service to the issue, with the true intent of doing nothing more about it for another 5-10 years.

    We've been hearing lip service by the Utah legislature about the necessity of legalizing marijuana for medical uses for 5-10 years, but up to this point in time the only use of marijuana that has been legalized by the Utah legislature is the use of CBD oil by a very narrow group of people--only those who suffer from seizures for which no other medication has been successful. At least make CBD oil legal to treat more conditions, such as anxiety--especially in light of recent disclosures that certain big pharma drugs that are prescribed to treat anxiety are highly addictive.

    When the legislature fails or refuses to do something the people want and need, the initiative process is the way to get that thing done. Without this initiative passing or coming close to passing, I have no faith that the Utah legislature will ever do anything about this issue. That's why I'm voting for the initiative.

  • bucksnort Midway, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:41 a.m.

    It should come as no surprise that the church is opposed to this bill, after all they are the most conservative group in the world. The question is, is there time to rewrite a better bill, that will answer everybody's concerns? Utah leads the nation in prescription drug abuse, primarily opioids-we need to address this problem NOW, I would urge the legislature to get in gear and write a bill that gets it right-lives are on the line, at least quality of life for many, many people, myself included.

  • jjjdsd CENTERVILLE, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:34 a.m.

    Where is the bigoted vitriol complaining about the Islamic Society of Utah and the Episcopal Diocese, which have also admonished their members to vote against the Prop 2? No just another excuse for Anti-Latter Day Saint, bigoted attacks.

    Not one advocate of the Prop 2 can show one bit of evidence of the Church forcing anyone to vote against Prop 2. There is no threat about their membership for anyone for voting for. There is no way for the Church to know which way a member voted.

    The question is, if the Prop. fails to pass, will the advocates accept the Democracy of the vote? Probably not.

    What anti-Church advocates hate is that Democracies, are ruled by the majority. Those decrying the Church are hypocrites that refuse to be governed by a Democracy. The state of Utah is all Democracy run.

  • Lia Sandy, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:23 a.m.

    From the very heart of the Utah State Constitution:

    Sec. 4. [Religious liberty.] The rights of conscience shall never be infringed. The State shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; no religious test shall be required as a qualification for any office of public trust or for any vote at any election; nor shall any person be incompetent as a witness or juror on account of religious belief or the absence thereof. There shall be no union of Church and State, nor shall any church dominate the State or interfere with its functions. No public money or property shall be appropriated for or applied to any religious worship, exercise or instruction, or for the support of any ecclesiastical establishment. No property qualification shall be required of any person to vote, or hold office, except as provided in this Constitution.

  • Lia Sandy, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:22 a.m.

    Utah ranks way up there in "happy pill" prescriptions...
    Why isn't the church up in arms about that?

  • search diligently Lehi, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:01 a.m.

    I am an acute and chronic pain sufferer. My doctors have given me everything I wanted... and more. Oxycodone, oxycontin, morphine, you name it. Sadly, yet fortunately probably, my body does not do well with these drugs... or I probably would be an addict.

    I would welcome a cannabis option. But I have spoken out against this law because it opens the door to use marijuana for recreational purposes and that is not what is in the best interests of our youth or adults. Other states are totally out of control on this issue.

    What I would like to see is careful control of how it is grown, how it is processed, and how it is prescribed. That is the sensible approach. This bill does not do that. Let's work on a fix to it and get it passed.

  • FractalTheorem West Jordan, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 9:19 a.m.

    Many backers of this proposition are wolves in sheep's clothing. The manner in which "medical marijuana" has been peddled in other states has clearly demonstrated that it is not really being used as a pharmaceutical. There's no control on purity, dosage, etc. It's really a free-for-all.

    If we want to apply it as a medicine, then let's treat it as one.

    I'm in favor of doing double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies on cannibis-derived products, for safety and efficacy, and for proper dosing.

    If we're going to do anything at all as a state (or even in the federal government), let's do the tests! Why is that not the discussion? Then we can properly apply it for the right diseases at the right dosages to have the most beneficial impacts!

    Any other discussion is merely using "Why won't you let sick people have medicine that would help them?" as a pretext for backdoor and later overt recreational use.

  • Thomas Jefferson Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 9:15 a.m.

    Just more 'lets wait' from the people who have shown that they will never move forward with any of this. All to protect you from a plant that you can get today without even trying.

    Ignore them and vote yes.

  • sgallen Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 9:13 a.m.

    I hope we can have compassion on suffering patients and make our own decisions.

  • Stalwart Sentinel San Jose, CA
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:57 a.m.

    I received the email from Elder Christensen this morning.

    To paraphrase, the Church used to advocate that we, "teach good principles and let the people govern themselves."

    Now, it has apparently changed to, "tell members how to vote and force the whole of society to live by our standards."

    I expect all the self-proclaimed free market conservatives and libertarians in Utah to vote "yes" on this bill in droves. To do otherwise is blatant hypocrisy.

  • DonO Draper, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:53 a.m.

    Where is the urgency in this issue for the individuals whose extreme pain and suffering can be relieved by cannabis? We know what the "coalition" is against but is there anything reasonable and timely that it will support? What are the "fixes" to Proposition 2 that are needed before the Church will support something like it? There is much talk of getting the legislature involved but are there any legislative proposals on the table?

    I'm still studying but as of now, I intend to vote for Proposition 2.

  • Don Bixby Centerville, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:42 a.m.

    @samhill, if you're looking for pain relief without getting high, then you want CBD oil. It is extracted, leaving out the THC which is the part that gets you high.

    In states with MM, they have regulation. They regularly test products to ensure they are at the right levels, plus you can't really overdose on CBD. The state can add quality controls. The initiative gives time for the state to get things in order in terms of licensing, etc. and specifically establishes quality testing.

    Prop 2 limits how many licenses can be given based on population, so most of our rural counties could only have one dispensary in the county. Salt Lake County would be able to have 8 dispensaries (they have well more than that many strip clubs there if we're legislating morality).

    The fear, uncertainty, and doubt around everyone being able to get as much weed as they want is unfounded. Per the proposition, you have to have a licensed medical doctor prescribe you a card, and they track and limit how much product you can purchase from dispensaries. Every plant is individually tracked, as is every person working in the industry. Doctors are limited in how many cards they can prescribe.

  • bamafone Salem, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:32 a.m.

    Pot heads gonna be like, bummer dude.

  • Owl Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:26 a.m.

    There is confusion when legitimate, evidence-based medical use of cannabadiol, which is not psychoactive, is conflated with those who want this initiative as an prelude to recreational use of tetrahydrocannabanol - marijuana. According to their statements the LDS church, among others, is not opposed to FDA approved marijuana-based medications.

  • bucksnort Midway, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:25 a.m.

    I would like to see a story about what exactly is in the bill-we keep hearing that the bill is too vague, in what way? We can't make an informed choice without all the facts, give us the facts.

  • Traveller Farmington, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:17 a.m.

    Imagine that 10% of "the people" (that's how many it takes) put together a petition to remove the speed limits on all the roads in the states. Then imagine a group of UDOT officials, police officers, and Church leaders got together and said "we think this is a dangerous idea that will cause more accidents and encourage everyone to vote against it."

    Would we see calls to "stay out of it!"

    Would we see grumblings about this group "desiring to remove our free agency?"

  • JWB Kaysville, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:17 a.m.

    Coalition is not just the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints.

    The News Release “Coalition Seeks Safe and Compassionate Alternative to Utah’s Medical Marijuana Initiative” provides a lot of current information for all voters to consider.

  • JWB Kaysville, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:08 a.m.

    The Prophets have guided our ancestors and still today God wants us to have happiness and joy by following the Prophet.

    Follow the prophet, follow the prophet,
    Follow the prophet; don’t go astray.
    Follow the prophet, follow the prophet,
    Follow the prophet; he knows the way.

  • RiDal Sandy, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 8:04 a.m.

    I am completely comfortable with having marijuana be treated like any other drug. If it has legitimately-shown medical usage, then "legalize" it with a prescription. If not, then we sholuis also recognize that, much as we try to ignore the reality, there is a gradiation in seriousness of "crimes" and "punishments". If someone is using some illegal pot for what appears to be legitimate medical problems, go lightly or even ignore them. If it is a pot and other drug dealer, punish them severely.

  • ConservativeCommonTater Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 7:51 a.m.

    When Sen. Madsen was trying to pass a bill for medical weed, he had a solid supporter in another legislator...until a day or so before the bill was up for a vote. It was said that the boys from "the Corp" had a talk with him prior to the vote and he pulled out.

    The same thing is happening here. The "Corp" is having discussions with their members and "convincing" them to vote against their own best interests.

    This is a clear case of the "Corp" interfering in politics and influencing the outcome of an election.

    Time for a Federal investigation and take the tax free status from the "Corp."

  • KHS UK, 00
    Aug. 24, 2018 6:22 a.m.

    They are just using it instrad of proven and approve drugs. They tried to encourage my wife to use marijuana to treat her MS. She had the drugs that dealt with her symptoms and if she had taken it the side effects would have made her worst. Remember marijuana is a untested and uncontrolled pharmaceutical. That is notapproved to be used as a drug. And drugs can not be perscribed with out proof they work.

  • Lia Sandy, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 5:53 a.m.

    Pot smokers will always get their weed...with or without laws.

  • scrappy do DRAPER, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 4:39 a.m.

    You get a knock on the door from we all know who and everything changes

    That’s how it works around here

  • samhill Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 12:47 a.m.

    I wish this article had actually informed us of the details of the issue rather than simply rehash people's "feelings" about it.

    Couldn't it have at least provided some underlying information about **why** people feel the proposition doesn't do, or does do, what they hoped it would? What, precisely, is the reason they are for or against it?

    The mushy kind of reporting on this topic is the biggest reason for my misgivings about the proposition.

    I've been a long-time supporter of finding out what benefits might be found in cannabis, largely because of back injuries during the last 25 years that have left me with chronically debilitating and nearly constant pain. I would desperately like something that could ease that pain without zombifying me.

    But, if the people who are writing and defending the proposition, and those who oppose it, can't come up with a way of actually arguing their positions with real, understandable logic and transparent clarity, then my sense is that something which started at 131 pages and was whittled down to 28 (a nearly 5:1 compression ratio) had, and maybe still has, more fairy dust than I am willing to trust, even after all the whittling.

  • Rocket Science Brigham City, UT
    Aug. 23, 2018 11:06 p.m.

    Why Y?

    Why should the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints stay out of the discussion?

    Is there no right to assemble with others that also have grave concerns?

    Is there no right for leaders to speak out when they see potential harm to society?

    Is it not freedom of religion for those who lead religious institutions to speak on issues they consider to have moral consequences?

  • Susan Quinton Draper, UT
    Aug. 23, 2018 11:04 p.m.

    One day, one day, one day....kicking the can down the road. Meanwhile, people are moving out of the state to get the medication they need. Vote yes in November, and let our voices be heard.

  • Rocket Science Brigham City, UT
    Aug. 23, 2018 10:29 p.m.

    While almost everyone will say there are substances in marijuana that can be used medicinally and while we should be working toward providing better ways to relieve those truly in need, anyone considering the ballot initiative should consider:

    1. Following the money. Article in "The Motely Fool" by Joey Frenette shows that "Pot Stocks" are being speculated in big time. The big money push is not from pharmacies opposing, it is from those who want to eventually move to totally unrestricted use. Utah's initiative isn't just medicinal it is a giant leap in the unrestricted direction.

    2. Every law enforcement officer I have spoken with so far has been adamantly opposed to this initiative. They are afraid for public safety. They don't see a clear way of enforcement. They see it as a proliferation toward unrestricted use. Automobile deaths due to marijuana are up significantly with 38 percent of drivers killed being tested positive for marijuana

    3. Utah Medical Association as well as National Medical Association are against the proposal as written as being dangerous to life and health including mental health.

    As it stands we must vote this dangerous initiative down.

  • John Pack Lambert of Michigan Ypsilanti, MI
    Aug. 23, 2018 9:03 p.m.

    Legislation by initiative is a horrible process in most cases. This is doubly so in the complex process of creating laws to regulate a whole new class of medications.

  • John Pack Lambert of Michigan Ypsilanti, MI
    Aug. 23, 2018 9:01 p.m.

    Those who claim to believe in the Church but actively work to oppose its goals show a lack of real belief and an unwillingness to head the counsel of Church leaders.

  • Y Ask Y Provo, UT
    Aug. 23, 2018 8:52 p.m.

    The Church should stay out of it.

  • Palmetto Bug Columbia, SC
    Aug. 23, 2018 8:23 p.m.

    I signed the petition to get this proposition on the ballot but won't vote for it this November. With more time to read and study the issue I don't think Proposition 2 accomplishes was I hoped it would. I'm not opposed to medical marijuana but don't think this law is the right way forward.

    I also question whether we should allow prescription drugs to be approved through a public vote. The FDA isn't perfect but it exists for a reason. I'd rather see marijuana go through a formal FDA approval process and regulated like similar prescriptions.

    Research has shown marijuana is much safer than many existing opioid prescriptions but that doesn't mean it's without risk. The sooner it can be legalized (the right way) the sooner we can move some people away from highly addictive opioids.

  • stevo123 Driggs, ID
    Aug. 23, 2018 8:05 p.m.

    The people petitioned the Government for the right to vote on this. Why the desire to remove our free agency.

  • tabuno Clearfield, UT
    Aug. 23, 2018 5:07 p.m.

    Not the most helpful of articles to inform readers as to the specific bases upon which to support or oppose this Initiative. More dramatic and marketing prose than incitement reporting.