When comedians, like David Cross, put religion in the crosshairs, controversy can follow

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  • Counter Intelligence Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 28, 2018 3:21 p.m.

    @unrepentant progressive

    "A prominent poster says: "Political correctness IS a catch-phrase to describe those who hate in the name of tolerance".
    IMHO, you have defined "political correctness" inappropriately and ascribed motives to those who wish tolerance for all that are false. "

    IMHO - I defined political correctness in its commonly used vernacular - a description of intolerance performed in the name of tolerance - as evidenced by your claiming to "wish tolerance for all " while mocking those who reject the intolerance of Cross

    Political correctness is the description of the behavior of those who claim to embody the golden rule, while they simultaneously exhibit the antithesis of the golden rule, ignoring the fact that tolerance is a two way street and failing to offer the same degree of tolerance that they themselves demand and claim to embody

    Therefore those who criticize political correctness AND religious bigotry are being consistent ; Those who hate in the name of tolerance, then lapse into victim mode when they are caught being intolerant, are being hypocritical

  • Thomas Jefferson Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Aug. 24, 2018 10:05 a.m.

    Rubydo said:
    "@thomas Jefferson,
    Not all religions are fair game."
    Yes they are.
    "If Cross attempted to do to Muslims what he did to the LDS dearly held beliefs there would be an uproar from civil liberties groups including CAIR."
    And those groups would have no power to stop him. He does make fun of Muslims as we all should.
    "The LDS don’t have an equivalent to CAIR who goes after someone every time a Muslim gets offended who are backed up by the pro Islamic establishment media."
    The church has a newspaper, a TV station, billions of dollars, and hundreds of lawyers that they use to their content.
    "A perfect example of this comedic hypocrisy would be the reaction of the main stream media to Roseanne Barr’s jokes. Why wasn’t Cross treated the same way by the university like the network treated Barr?"
    Because they cant. A network is a private entity and as such doesnt have to respect free speech.
    I hope that clears it all up.

    @carman

    1)Whatever.
    2)So?

    "You can hold to your low-brow view,"
    Oh thank you. I was waiting for your approval.

    "It says more about your character than about the value of your position."
    Fine. Good luck with your sense of self-superiority.

  • unrepentant progressive Bozeman, MT
    Aug. 24, 2018 9:45 a.m.

    A prominent poster says: "Political correctness IS a catch-phrase to describe those who hate in the name of tolerance".

    IMHO, you have defined "political correctness" inappropriately and ascribed motives to those who wish tolerance for all that are false. This is not good logic, and probably a product of projection rather than considered thought.

    Critics of even the mildest of "political correctness" fail to remember that tolerance is a two way street. It is a challenge to be tolerant of those who would wish you harm or diminish your personhood. However, as a general rule I think the concept of "political correctness" is important. After all, isn't it an iteration of the Golden Rule?

    therefore those who criticize political correctness AND religious bigotry are being consistent ; Those who hate in the name of tolerance, then lapse into victim mode when they are caught being intolerant, are being hypocritical

  • Karen R. Houston, TX
    Aug. 24, 2018 6:28 a.m.

    @ carman

    I don't think your beliefs are meaningless. Clearly they do have meaning to you and others like you. This doesn't mean they have or should have meaning to me, including "sacredness." Expecting this from outsiders and getting in a huff when they don't treat your ideas as you'd like is no different than the kids on campuses demanding that their environs be regulated so they're "safe" or they won't be "triggered."* It's ridiculous. Whether intentional or not, it's a bid to control the world to your liking and no one is entitled to that. No one's ideas are entitled to immunity from challenge or mockery. Thank goodness, too.

    *For what it's worth, David Cross takes this on too.

  • carman Wasatch Front, UT
    Aug. 23, 2018 8:03 p.m.

    To Ranch:

    re: "Why bother worrying? Your superstitions are based on, well, superstition and are thus meaningless."

    Said with such certainty! Haha.

    You cannot disprove my beliefs, and you cannot prove yours. Therefore a modicum of humility may be in order. I choose faith in Jesus Christ, repentance/forgiveness and trying to lead a clean life. I don't tell you that you are wrong as you tell me, I simply tell you that I have faith in God, who's children I believe we are. If misplaced, my faith causes me little harm, and it certainly doesn't negatively impact you.

    God bless.

  • JonasBilly Hooper, UT
    Aug. 23, 2018 3:29 p.m.

    I won’t come and see David’s show (I think that’s his name though I seem to have already forgotten it), because I have about a thousand less expensive and more entertaining other things I can do.

    Like watch grass grow, or count clouds, or clean my X’s windows, or go visit my in-laws, or volunteer down at the tax commission, or clean public restrooms, etc

  • Ranch Here, UT
    Aug. 23, 2018 1:17 p.m.

    @carman;

    Why bother worrying? Your superstitions are based on, well, superstition and are thus meaningless. You can worry about it for me okay?

  • EscherEnigma Ridgecrest, CA
    Aug. 23, 2018 11:29 a.m.

    "Have you heard of Karma?"
    Yes.

    It's a central concept to the belief of reincarnation found in Buddhist and Hindu faiths, in which good and bad deeds in this life will determine the conditions of your next reincarnation.

    As your use of it here demonstrates, it is a concept that is often bastardized and distorted in western culture to disconnect it from it's religious roots and connection to reincarnation to make more tolerable to Christian audiences.

    @Pops
    "I think the problem with some comedians is that they don't understand that comedy must be respectful to be funny. "
    Go look at any long-running comedy show, the Simpsons, Futurama, South Park, Friends, etc. and so-on. You may not find such things funny (I personally find little to laugh at in such shows), but there's no doubt that many people do find them funny, enough to keep them on the air for years and years. And they are seldom "respectful".

    So no. Respectful comedy may be your preference, but it is not a requirement.

    @Confused
    "No one has a right to mock sacred things in disguise of Comedy."
    Everyone has a right to mock. What they do not have is a right to an audience. Boycott if it offends you.

  • bloke American Fork, Utah
    Aug. 23, 2018 8:57 a.m.

    Because of a racial slur I can no longer buy my favorite pizza at the U. But the U has no problem turning its head on this one.

  • dotGone Puyallup, WA
    Aug. 23, 2018 8:02 a.m.

    A healthy sense of humor is vital to survival - for me, anyway. When something hard happens, I know I'm recovering when laughter returns. I don't like mean humor, but humans and our institutions do have a funny side. It doesn't hurt to see it. Sometimes and in some ways, humor helps us survive. For example, when my son died, I was devastated. I didn't want to live anymore. Condolences came in. One life long friend, listening to me talk said "you should take up smoking". It was a ridiculously irreverent thing to say.... but also hilarious. I laughed and said "that would take too long." We laughed me back into being realistic. It doesn't mean I don't still hurt or love my son any less, but: Of course, I want to keep living. I could go on with examples, but you get the idea. A healthy sense of humor is vital, valuable. I can laugh about my religion too.... but not mean or cruel humor. Let's don't take ourselves too seriously. It's exhausting

  • carman Wasatch Front, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 3:00 p.m.

    To Ranch:

    re: "Fun fact #2; religion is nothing but superstition."

    It's a big bet. For your sake, you better be right.

  • carman Wasatch Front, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 2:53 p.m.

    To Thomas Jefferson:

    re: "I believe that nothing is 'sacred'. Its all made up by humans.
    Your 'beliefs' are fair game, as they should be in a free country. Feel free to defend your beliefs but just whining about 'being offended' isnt a defense, its a cop out.
    Feel free to make fun of my wacky beliefs...if you can figure out what they are."

    Two problems with your view, IMHO. 1) The PC crowd is ok mocking and demeaning one group and certain ideal, while vehemently defending others they are ideologically aligned with. There is stark hypocrisy. 2) It is just unkind and mean-spirited.

    You can hold to your low-brow view, but it says more about your character than about the value of your position.

  • skeptic Phoenix, AZ
    Aug. 22, 2018 2:47 p.m.

    If Mormons world just step out from under their own shadow they could appreciate how funny, curious, different and enjoyable that they are.

  • Catamount Plymouth, MI
    Aug. 22, 2018 1:07 p.m.

    @Frozen.
    You make a salient point. I would not be surprised that U of U administrators decided that since they allowed Ben Shapiro to speak on campus, they now have to allow virtually anyone the same opportunity. Or, in other words, it may be that most of the U of U administrators (including President Watkins) believe that conservatives are simply the rock-bottom of the barrel.

  • water rocket Magna, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 1:03 p.m.

    When so called comedians resort to the vulgar, the mocking of others, and try to appeal to the basest of human emotions to (try) to get a laugh, then they are showing their own lack of talent.

  • Cadish Logan, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 1:02 p.m.

    Here's my struggle. I get the free speech issue. And I agree our constitution protects that. But there is a deeper level of censorship that society enforces. Not all "hate speech" is created equally in the eyes of popular society. Sure wearing a temple garment of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints may not raise many eyebrows in popular society, but what about wearing blackface, or dressing as a rape victim, or a holocaust fatality. All technically protected by free speech, but certainly society does not tolerate those who mock these things as they enjoy popular protection. The news is full of people who have had society enforce harsh consequences because of their mockery of the sacrosant.

    People love to throw around terms like "historically disenfranchised" to justify this extra societal protection. And I agree that we should be respectful of everyone's sacred beliefs. However, I have not seen an argument that convinces me how winking at the mockery of other groups serves the greater good.

    My solution is not to tolerate disrespectful speech of these groups, but to not socially tolerate any speech that is disrespectful of the sacred beliefs of anyone.

  • hbeckett Colfax, CA
    Aug. 22, 2018 12:35 p.m.

    It may be ok for a university or some other uncouth individual to take public funds for this drivil by claiming freedom of speach freedom of speach is not free many have given the last full measure of devotion for this nation for the people to set back and condone this behavior by any person they will get their comeuppons guaranteed probably sooner than later I will not pay or participate with this lot ever period I understand that the DN Just reports on the going's on in Utah to a very large audience at least I do not have to pay for the reporting

  • Flynn Ryder Orem, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 11:52 a.m.

    David Cross is just a Kathy Griffin in training.

  • Frozen Fractals Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 11:49 a.m.

    The University would probably love to get rid of this problem but they determined a year ago over the Shapiro visit that when they rent out spaces at a public (government) institution, they're stuck with the unsavory guests because free speech allowances are broad in the public sector.

  • NeifyT Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 11:42 a.m.

    I used up all my posts on the previous article; so I would like to continue my train of thought on this article.

    Why I don't find David Cross's photo of temple garments to be offensive (even though I am an endowed member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and wear temple garments.)

    Years ago, I looked up the definition of "offend" in a Webster's Dictionary; and was extremely disappointed; because even though it was a dictionary, it acted more like a thesaurus and just listed three synonyms. I looked up those three words and they also just had synonyms except one that had a decent definition. I don't remember those now; but a current definition I find is "cause to feel upset, annoyed, or resentful"

    I couldn't understand how anyone could be "offended" because I walk a little different (like a penguin); yet that is exactly one of the reasons I was told that people felt offended by me.

    So, I began to look into feelings; and learn how to better define them. And I found that when I felt "offended" at someone else, it gave them power over me. If I wanted to stay empowered myself, I realized I had to learn not to take offense; even when someone tried to offend me.

  • Justin M Sacramento, CA
    Aug. 22, 2018 11:42 a.m.

    I echo "Mainly Me" in their post - the best thing for people to hope for is that anybody who had contemplated going to this performance and has respect for other LDS in their lives is that they avoid going.

    The best sign to a comedian that he's irrelevant will be a small crowd in a big venue who doesn't laugh at the jokes. An even better one will be those who walk out during the performance.

    It's something I've had to do during a comic's performance on a cruise ship, when he started flinging F-bombs.

  • The Atheist Provo, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 11:36 a.m.

    Religious believers, please read your scriptures and see all the places where your official doctrines and beliefs "mock", disparage, belittle, and condemn non-believers.

    Then look at how you ostracize and badly treat us in real life.

    Once you have faced the truth about yourselves,
    Then let's talk...

  • procuradorfiscal Tooele, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 11:27 a.m.

    Re: "Anyone who complains about David Cross cannot criticize the college students who protest speakers on college campuses or the people who criticize art for not being 'PC'".

    Sure we can.

    We not only can, we do complain about and criticize both. What our ethics prevent us from doing is what student lemmings are famous for -- witless acceptance of their leftist professors' instigation to violently throttle others' free-speech rights.

    Community organizing -- the Left's substitute for actual thinking.

  • Avg-Guy Orem, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 11:25 a.m.

    If he had made fun of gays or muslims The U would have cancelled his show. I'm not a fan of picking on minorities. And believe it or not Mormons (sorry name) are a more significant minority than gays or Muslims - maybe not in UT but in the US for sure.

  • mrknowitall14 sandy, ut
    Aug. 22, 2018 11:07 a.m.

    Herbert Gravy said "Couldn't he just make a few jokes about green jello, funeral potatoes, and fruit punch and be done with it?"

    Unfortunately for him, no. Making jokes about those things would indicate that he has some understanding of the "Mormon culture." The problem is that he has zero understanding of it. He is mocking something that he knows nothing about. He had probably never even heard of garments until his publicist recommended the photo, let alone have any clue what the garment means to the LDS people.

    He targets the Mormons for 2 reasons. First, he knew that it would generate buzz about his show. I had no clue he was coming, and it would have come and gone without me finding out, had it not been for this. Second, it has become socially acceptable to mock people of faith for the sake of being PC. I take that back, it has become a social obligation to mock people of faith.

    The sad thing for people like Mr. Cross is that unfunny people can become famous "comedians" because they are good at using shock humor. He is able to get a crowd riled about about something simply because he is willing to be disgusting, not because he is actually funny.

  • Rubydo Provo, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 10:56 a.m.

    @thomas Jefferson,
    Not all religions are fair game. If Cross attempted to do to Muslims what he did to the LDS dearly held beliefs there would be an uproar from civil liberties groups including CAIR. The LDS don’t have an equivalent to CAIR who goes after someone every time a Muslim gets offended who are backed up by the pro Islamic establishment media. A perfect example of this comedic hypocrisy would be the reaction of the main stream media to Roseanne Barr’s jokes. Why wasn’t Cross treated the same way by the university like the network treated Barr?

  • Counter Intelligence Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 10:52 a.m.

    @unrepentant progressive

    "And how ironic it is to see so many who have criticized "political correctness" now find it's logic convenient when their ox is being metaphorically gored.

    Bigotry, is bigotry, is bigotry. It is not funny. It hurts. It insults. It demeans. Whether it be a racial minority, a sexual minority, a cultural minority or a religious minority, bigotry is inappropriate, though it is protected by freedom of speech. Let's just not be selective in our outrage."

    Political correctness IS a catch-phrase to describe those who hate in the name of tolerance; therefore those who criticize political correctness AND religious bigotry are being consistent ; Those who hate in the name of tolerance, then lapse into victim mode when they are caught being intolerant, are being hypocritical

  • Counter Intelligence Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 10:43 a.m.

    Imagine if a couple of Mormons (sorry, there needs to be some nickname, because the full name is too long) living in the Fairfax neighborhood of LA decided to mock Jews. It was so successful that they petitioned the City of LA to lease the a former synagogue (that had been donated to the City) to host an ongoing satire of Jewish culture that included such wonderful skits as singing sultry song wearing only sacred attire.
    It would be called anti-Semitic and hateful; now reverse roles and it is called Saturdays Voyeur

    Certainly comedians have the right to offend; But i have the right to discount then as intolerant hypocrites, bullies, bigots and frauds.

    Poster 'Thomas Jefferson' perfectly the illustrates the spectacular lack of self awareness of many "tolerant" people who merely mirror the hate they claim to despise - only worse

    There seems to be nothing more intolerant than a "tolerant" person.

  • Flipphone Sandy, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 10:29 a.m.

    The LDS church does provide a lot of material for comedians.

  • Billy Bob Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 10:20 a.m.

    It's pretty simple. Cross has the right to make tasteless, unfunny, potentially offensive jokes about whatever. I have the right to ignore him. Others have the right to protest him. And still others have the right to pay him so they can watch him make tasteless, unfunny, potentially offensive jokes if they like that kind of "humor". The U of U president was exactly correct in her response.

  • strom thurmond taylorsville, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:59 a.m.

    The Mormon church is an easy target for comedians and satirists for the following reasons (and has been since Samuel Clements first took aim at it after passing through Utah)

    1. The religion appeared after the invention of the printing press

    2. Numerous contemporaries wrote about its early leaders and practices

    3. Polygamy, abstaining from coffee and tea (the second and third most consumed beverages on earth after water) and other issues

    4. The internet gives access to information regarding 2

    5. Members are unfamiliar with #2

    Some embrace this status, while others are angered

  • Thomas Jefferson Cottonwood Heights, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:47 a.m.

    I cant wait. David Cross is hilarious.
    Why do people on this forum pretend that they can teach a guy who has had a long and successful career in comedy what is 'really' funny.

    I believe that nothing is 'sacred'. Its all made up by humans.
    Your 'beliefs' are fair game, as they should be in a free country. Feel free to defend your beliefs but just whining about 'being offended' isnt a defense, its a cop out.
    Feel free to make fun of my wacky beliefs...if you can figure out what they are.

  • RiDal Sandy, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:38 a.m.

    The "meme" in today's secular, amoral culture is that religion is just a bunch of superstitions to keep uneducated hicks under control.
    I guess freedom of speech demands that we "tolerate" insults and mockery. But just imagine if no one came to his shows and no one laughed at what he said.

  • quackquack Park City, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:35 a.m.

    I don't see what all the huff ad puff is about the media has been putting the Muslim religion in their articles for decades but now shoe is on the other foot a comedian who is basically irrelevant to the LDS tweets a few things....

  • Thucydides Herriman, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:29 a.m.

    @ carmen

    "Mockery and ridicule of any protected class - race, religion, gender, etc. is NEVER ok."

    A statement like this could easily be used to justify events like the Charlie Hebdo attacks, and many others carried out in the name of defending sacred things.

    That there are people who really think this way terrifies me. Genuinely, terrifies me.

  • dmcvey Los Angeles, CA
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:25 a.m.

    Anyone who complains about David Cross cannot criticize the college students who protest speakers on college campuses or the people who criticize art for not being "PC".

  • AZ Blue & Red Gilbert, AZ
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:22 a.m.

    If his comments were in regard to Blacks or LGBT he would be banned from his performance. Yet it is OK to mock and insult the most prominent religion of the area?

    Isn't this another form of racism and intolerance for a group of people that we always hear about? Seems a tad bit hypocritical to me.

    Thanks for the U of U Pres to stand up. But the show must go on? Again if it were for other groups would the show go on? Where is SLC Mayors comments?

    Poking fun it one thing. Insulting sacred things is another.

  • stand up for truth Lehi, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:06 a.m.

    Its sad to me to see someone do this and, in the name of freedom of speech and tolerance, give him the forum to "entertain" at the expense of what is very offensive to others.

    I know it put a lot of pressure on Ruth Watkins, president of the University of Utah, to know how to handle this. I have not read her released statement condemning religious intolerance, but stating the show will go on.

    I do know this... my great great uncle is Joseph Thomas Kingsbury. He was president of the U of U longer than any other man since it was founded. He was considered by many "liberal" in his views. But he was also a man of faith and and the moral courage to take on other professors who were, at the time, exercising their first amendment rights to put down the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. To have Cross occupy a forum at Kingsbury Hall, named after my gg uncle saddens me.

    If we condone, accept or even tolerate these behaviors, we are part of the problem.

    "The offensive use of sacred religious imagery in a tweet by David Cross promoting his performance at Kingsbury Hall was in opposition to the university's values of respect and inclusivity," Watkins said. Amen to that.

  • kbee Syracuse, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 9:04 a.m.

    Quote from the front page of the Deseret News: "Religion and comedy often mix, but it's difficult for comedians to determine the best way to discuss faith." What? Discuss faith? That is totally not what comedians do. They promote serious discussion haha. They want attention, money and laughs. They are entertainers for heavens sake. They promote themselves not discussion. If this is what people will pay to see and laugh at, then there you go. Success. When a comedian chooses to make fun of sacred things for one group, it is not sacred for another group. Comedy walks on and over the line of kindness because it can. It's subjective.

  • unrepentant progressive Bozeman, MT
    Aug. 22, 2018 8:59 a.m.

    "bigotry isn't funny"

    Many of us agree. It stings when you are mocked.

    Yet these same offended people often freely mock others. Mr Cross obviously doesn't understand the offense given his picture. Still, the victims of Mr Cross have freely tweeted out insults to minorities with impunity with no recognition that it might be as insulting to their objects of their scorn and derision.

    And how ironic it is to see so many who have criticized "political correctness" now find it's logic convenient when their ox is being metaphorically gored.

    Bigotry, is bigotry, is bigotry. It is not funny. It hurts. It insults. It demeans. Whether it be a racial minority, a sexual minority, a cultural minority or a religious minority, bigotry is inappropriate, though it is protected by freedom of speech. Let's just not be selective in our outrage.

  • Confused Sandy, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 8:57 a.m.

    I have a question for those that support David Crass....

    If he had adorn himself with Muslim sacred clothing to make a joke, would you think that is okay?

    Or if he adorn himself in some of the Jewish religion sacred garments, would you still be laughing and shucking it off as "Entertainment"?

    What if he painted his face black (like they did in the 20's and 30's) to make jokes about the Black Culture? How would you feel?

    What David did was crass, rude and insensitive to the members of the LDS church. No one has a right to mock sacred things in disguise of Comedy.

  • BradJames Manti, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 8:31 a.m.

    As the book of Galatians mentions "God will not be mocked." When Jehovah speaks to Moses, He implies to His chosen prophet, that He has sensitive feelings. While Cross has his moral agency to act as he will, the Lord doesn't like it when mortals trifle with sacred things.

  • TKB Provo, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 8:29 a.m.

    Steve Allen was a proponent of clean humor and believed that comics that resorted to the crude, vulgar and offensive where unprofessional and lacking in talent. Cross apparently falls in that category. A waste of U of U $ and resources.

  • Ranch Here, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 8:24 a.m.

    NoNames says:

    "And bigotry isn't funny"

    -- Ironic post of the day.

    @Schwa:

    Fun fact #2; religion is nothing but superstition.

    PS; I didn't know who he was until all the hoopla (never watched Arrested Development either).

  • neece Hyde Park, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 8:15 a.m.

    Someone said:
    "Fun fact: Freedom of religion is protected by the same amendment as freedom of speech."

    Yes you are correct, but that same moral compass that wouldn't offend your mother, is the same type of moral compass that shouldn't offend something so sacred to a religion or faith.

    I am sad that he won't apologize, however then I don't have to go see him. I don't think that was a very smart move consider this state is predominantly LDS.

  • skeptic Phoenix, AZ
    Aug. 22, 2018 8:12 a.m.

    Church comedy and religious hilarity would be real funny if they weren’t so specifically true, dangerous, and injurious. They really should be tagged with a warning label.

  • carman Wasatch Front, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 7:59 a.m.

    It is sad that a taxpayer funded school like the UofU would tolerate the mockery of the religion held by a majority of taxpayers in the state. To be clear, Latter-day Saints can laugh at themselves, and their is a plethora of comedy that can be funny and appropriate regarding LDS culture and behaviors. But David Cross crossed a thick black line when he went from poking fun to complete mockery of something that Latter-day Saints see as sacred, and a symbol and reminder of their commitments and covenants with God.

    Mockery and ridicule of any protected class - race, religion, gender, etc. is NEVER ok. Have fun, yes. But mean-spirited attacks are just that, mean-spirited and out-of-line. David Cross should not be welcome at the University of Utah if he is going to behave the way he has. He thinks he's being edgy, but he is just being rude and unkind.

  • Y Ask Y Provo, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 7:40 a.m.

    I think Cross is funny. Those who are bothered by his joke would never have been in his audience anyway. Cest la vie. Different strokes for different folks.

  • Pops NORTH SALT LAKE, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 7:20 a.m.

    I think the problem with some comedians is that they don't understand that comedy must be respectful to be funny. Division and derision aren't funny, they're painful. Let's laugh together about the many oddities and idiosyncrasies in our culture and behavior.

  • Herbert Gravy Salinas, CA
    Aug. 22, 2018 7:06 a.m.

    Couldn't he just make a few jokes about green jello, funeral potatoes, and fruit punch and be done with it?

    🤗

  • Herbert Gravy Salinas, CA
    Aug. 22, 2018 7:03 a.m.

    This appears to be a "contested development".

    And, rightly so.

    🤗

  • Shaun Sandy, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 6:13 a.m.

    @toosmart

    “Allowing controversy in the form of mocking isn't leadership or vision---it's pathetic.”

    Trump is like that and tons of people support his irreverence.

  • Cinci Man FT MITCHELL, KY
    Aug. 22, 2018 5:58 a.m.

    "Ruth Watkins, president of the University of Utah, released a statement condemning religious intolerance", and then facilitates it with a venue. Hmm.

    But then she fails to put meat into her statement and lets the show go on. I wish all donors to the University who truly will not tolerate bigotry withhold donations for a year. Maybe Ruth would stand behind her currently toothless stand. What a missed opportunity.

  • ute alumni Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 4:37 a.m.

    More anti folks will go and he’ll be “hysterical”. DN wouldn’t past previous post. The short of it, my disposable $ will no longer go to the U. I’m done.

  • Independent Henderson, NV
    Aug. 22, 2018 1:45 a.m.

    I can maybe understand why my religion would be funny to David Cross. I've laughed at plenty of his material before. He doesn't care whether his tweet was offensive to me or not, so I won't waste time worrying about it. I hope some day he comes around to seeing why this was so unfunny to all of us. More than that I hope he will some day come around to seeing why those things are not only sacred to us, but could also be sacred to him. It's obvious he doesn't see that in the least right now, or he wouldn't have done that. It doesn't hurt me any. I'm just sad that he's missing out. You're a child of God, David, and you have endless potential. I hope you see that some day, and I hope you see that we're your brothers and sisters whom you wouldn't want to ridicule.

  • Schwa Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 1:03 a.m.

    Fun fact: Freedom of religion is protected by the same amendment as freedom of speech.

  • 1Reader Alpine, UT
    Aug. 22, 2018 12:22 a.m.

    Recall that a key aspect of David Cross's character in Arrested Development was being a 'never nude', so that plays toward his comedic interest in underwear.

    Almost by definition, those not taking part in a given religious tradition for whatever reason will lack the understanding and appreciation for it, particularly spiritually.

  • Latter-daySaintForever St. George, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 10:38 p.m.

    You could not pay me enough to go and see him.

  • Seldom Seen Smith Orcutt, CA
    Aug. 21, 2018 10:13 p.m.

    My interest in pop culture wanes with each passing day. Deep, profound, creative. Not!

  • fatherof7 Hurricane, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 9:25 p.m.

    "You can take all the sincerity in Hollywood, put it in a knats naval and have room left over for two caraway seeds and an agents heart." - Unknown Hollywood producer.

  • John Charity Spring Back Home in Davis County, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 9:20 p.m.

    I issue my strongest possible condemnation to this so-called joke. It was bigoted and offensive. It was hardly creative, and simply showed a lack of any ability to create real humor.

    The modern entertainment industry has an open and stated agenda of attacking religion. This is just more of the same.

    If this so-called comedian has freedom of speech, it must be understood that the public has the freedom not to listen. A complete and general boycott should be the answer to this bigotry.

  • toosmartforyou Kaysville, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 8:47 p.m.

    It's just amazing at the number of comments that support irreligious, offensive, shock-type humor to grab an audience that will pay money to witness such a performance based upon the First Amendment. Personally, such humor shouldn't be supported unless one finds it funny to bully others and mock them for their beliefs, regardless of which faith they espouse. That's what's happened to society---anything is OK except something that can be termed a racial or sexual preference slur. Let that same type of humor be tried in largely Jewish areas of the country mocking Judaism or against the Muslim people and see what the reactions would be.

    Allowing controversy in the form of mocking isn't leadership or vision---it's pathetic.

  • Kingsbury10 Salt Lake City, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 8:29 p.m.

    I think the real issue is being missed. The performer wants attention and succeeded.

    The focus should instead be on how the University President responded. To summarize: she missed a wonderful opportunity to bring the unique community together while setting a wise academic example.

    She tried to please all sides by making a trite reference to the First Amendment while acknowledging how offensive it was. That wouldn’t have been tolerated in an elementary constitutional law class.

    She must have known that something like this would arise during her tenure. How encouraging it would have been for her to announce they anticipated this type of issue and set forth a new policy that protects all constitutional rights, both speech and freedom to practice religion free of harassment.

    Visionaries anticipate conflicts and address solutions in advance; leaders address complicated issues after they arise.

    She missed showing herself as a visionary. Hopefully she can show her leadership.

  • NoNamesAccepted St. George, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 8:24 p.m.

    The sad thing is, this was such a missed opportunity.

    As a lifelong member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I'm the first to point out that there is a lot about the church and the Utah culture that springs from it that is really very funny. There is a lot that can be presented as gut splitting humorous to both members of the Church and non-members alike, that mature, secure members would not find offensive, mean-spirited, nor sacrilegious. A fair bit would not necessarily be appropriate to use in a Sacrament Meeting talk. But it would not be crass or offensive in a secular setting.

    And just as members of a minority group (racial, ethnic, sexual, or otherwise) get more latitude to use words that are offensive when used by non-members of that group, members of the Church have more latitude to poke fun at their own culture without it being offensive than do non or ex members. But even for those not members, there is a lot of humorous material that isn't going to offend.

    But a photo like used by so many hateful anti-Mormon groups simply isn't funny. It shows a lack of talent and creativity, perhaps some deep seated, ugly bigotries.

    And bigotry isn't funny,

  • NoNamesAccepted St. George, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 8:18 p.m.

    Shakespeare was commissioned to write an anti-Semitic play. His audiences, most of whom had never met a Jewish person, thought Merchant of Venice was hilarious. Today, the comedic aspects of the play are heavily tempered by very troubling mistreatment of the Jewish character.

    There was a time when Polack jokes, black jokes, Muslim jokes, homosexual jokes, or jokes about overweight women were all considered quite funny. Today, many of those jokes are considered not just politically incorrect, but down right mean-spirited.

    Humor always has the potential to offend someone. Comedy is not a "safe space." But just as there is a difference between innuendo and crass, there is a difference between honest or even edgy, and down right mean-spirited. The difference is talent, vs being a hack. As a great comic who always told clean jokes once asked, "Why does it have to be a Polack joke. Why not just a joke about a stupid person?"

    It is a shame that Christianity, and Mormonism in particular, remains a legitimate target for such crass, mean-spirited attacks. Revealing that those who scream "hate speech" so freely in other cases, defend this kind of crassness here.

  • Uncle Rico Provo, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 8:13 p.m.

    Can you imagine if he would have did something against another group? Possibly a politically correct religious group or another group? He would be shamed forever. Somehow this is ok though - double standard!
    He is tolerant... of those that think like him.

  • loyal-tothe-royal Panguitch, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 7:51 p.m.

    Eh... not offended. The guy's just trying desperately to stay relevant after his glory years from arrested development (before it tanked).
    I feel bad for him if he has to resort to that to draw a crowd, lacks creativity. I wish the guy luck...

  • cmsense Kaysville, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 7:48 p.m.

    Just because you can legally do something, doesn't mean you should do something.

    Making fun of something sacred to millions could find an audience I suppose, but if that is how you find joy or humour, then too bad for you.

    There are actually classy people who actually treat people kindly and with respect. People can choose which crowd they enjoy and what kind of person they want to be. I believe only one will find true happiness.

    Have you heard of Karma? If you want to be respected, be respectful and honorable.

    Meanness is not funny. It is much more satisfying to laugh with people than at people. I think it takes more talent to laugh with people.

  • Chessermesser West Valley City, UT
    Aug. 21, 2018 7:44 p.m.

    Cross is Crass.

  • Mainly Me Werribee, 00
    Aug. 21, 2018 7:02 p.m.

    The best way to deal with people like Cross is to ignore him. He's here to make money no matter what he has to do or who he has to hurt. Simply ignore him and don't patronize or listen to his garbage.