Holladay residents turn in petition in hopes of blocking old Cottonwood Mall development

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  • sea_nettles Farmington, UT
    Aug. 4, 2018 12:03 a.m.

    "This property is some of the nicest available in the state" - yes, because the people who turned Holladay into what it is now made it that way. "Old people" are not against some change- they've simply lived long enough to gather a bit of smarts along the way... urbanizing beautiful Holladay even further is a mistake. Welcoming crowds from California who are escaping CA but will nevertheless continue on with their terrible ideas is also a bad idea.

    Developers are in it for themselves and city councils are there for the current residents- period. Yeah, the current parking lot is ugly- but so will be another megamall full of high-density housing and increased 'diversity' - whatever that's supposed to mean, and that sort of mix of shopping and urbanized housing does not a community make.

    Utah is becoming more and more desirable and attracting tons of folks for many reasons, but we can definitely say that my ancestors and yours- if you're a descendant of the pioneers who came here- built this state. No, we don't want to be stuck in the past. But we DO want to embrace our roots enough, be wise enough to know once things have become completely urbanized, there's no going back.

  • Man from Dear River West Jordan, UT
    July 13, 2018 2:43 p.m.

    Having lived in Holladay, and would move back there in a heart beat., this is a good balanced and grounded plan.

    The days of large lots are gone except for the uber rich. So this NIMBY is basically SELFISH and playing the pain in the access obstacle position. Do they have a plan or just opposition. I will be honest in saying that a 7 story building might be a pain, but the cemetery is just east of the site, so their are few backyards that will be inconvenienced.

    The plan is about the future, not the present. A big vacant lot and a tacky strip mall ain't the solution.

    So what they are proposing exists already. Go the District in Day break where their are 40 shops and eating places. Holladay is almost bereft of eating places and virtually no shopping venues. You have to drive to Fashion Mall for that. You saw the old village remodeled totally and the tacky OLD buildings scraped to the basement and replaced with buildings that are period to the classic times of Utah and the new contemporary City Creek. Gateway and now Daybreak template.

  • mstar Kaysville, UT
    July 13, 2018 1:14 p.m.

    This development in my opinion would be a great addition to this area. If done correctly, the diversity this would create in Holliday should be welcome. Holliday shouldn't be wanting nothing buy McMansions everywhere. "Quality" density mixed into the McMansions and a walkable entertainment district would make this area even more desirable. This development is also better than the old mall that used to be there and is definitely better than a large empty plot of ground full of weeds. I don't get the opposition at all.

  • mstar Kaysville, UT
    July 13, 2018 1:14 p.m.

    This development in my opinion would be a great addition to this area. If done correctly, the diversity this would create in Holliday should be welcome. Holliday shouldn't be wanting nothing buy McMansions everywhere. "Quality" density mixed into the McMansions and a walkable entertainment district would make this area even more desirable. This development is also better than the old mall that used to be there and is definitely better than a large empty plot of ground full of weeds. I don't get the opposition at all.

  • Soft Spoken Salt Lake City, UT
    July 13, 2018 12:42 p.m.

    Give it up already!! The decision has been made.. Housing is needed throughout the
    Salt Lake valley. All the complainers are just making a lot of noises because they do not stand to make lots of money out of the development.

  • Impartial8 Sandy, UT
    July 13, 2018 12:04 p.m.

    It looks nice. What's wrong with the people in Holladay?

  • gonefishn Salt Lake City, UT
    July 13, 2018 11:35 a.m.

    This property has been an eye sore for years. I applaud the folks that want to invest the time and money in my community to make something nice, useful and god forbid, profitable.
    I applaud my neighbors for their activism but have never grasped what exactly they wanted? This land was always going to be developed. The developer already revised the project in compromise and it passed 6-0.

  • imsmarterthanyou Salt Lake City, UT
    July 13, 2018 11:35 a.m.

    I'm in the process of moving out of the valley. Had all the traffic & rat race I can take. But, I'm not quite completely gone yet, so I will support the people in fighting against this. I am against high density housing in any form. Single family homes on large lots. Let's keep the crowd to a minimum thanks.

  • water rocket Magna, UT
    July 13, 2018 11:27 a.m.

    The only things certain in life are taxes, change, and death. If you don't like the changes around you, and you want higher taxes, then, sure fight the changes that could help with the taxes. Change is inevitable.

  • Todd_i Midway, UT
    July 13, 2018 10:54 a.m.

    I loved the Cottonwood Mall as a teenager and spent many years there shopping, eating, and watching movies. However, the mall lot and most of the neighboring commercial property have needed rebirth for almost thirty years. The proposal looks exciting to me. I only wish I owned property nearby as the value is sure to raise. This property is some of the nicest available in the state and a wonderful new center will truly complement the surrounding areas and provide a walkable live-work-play amenity.

    In an area with an aging population, I welcome new housing and services as it brings youth and vitality back.

  • drh3010 Draper, UT
    July 13, 2018 10:41 a.m.

    @DrVenkman
    "I find it interesting that so many people complain about rising housing costs in Utah, but then complain about developments like this."

    I find it interesting that this type of development isn't even allowed in the city where you live. I wonder why.

    "The reality is that Utah is a much different place than it was 10 years ago and is growing very quickly."

    Yep and it's awful. The traffic is a nightmare all the time.

    "If we want more affordable housing, then developments like this need to move forward. It's simple supply and demand, really."

    Really? It's developers maximizing profits because they can. They'd build a 100 storey apartment complex if they could get away with it because the developers don't have to live there. They live in a nice house somewhere in Alpine.

  • Flipphone Sandy, UT
    July 13, 2018 10:36 a.m.

    Looks like a very nice development. beats what there is their now.

  • El Gringo Mesa, AZ
    July 13, 2018 9:57 a.m.

    Classic not in my backyard. You can’t complain about the lack of affordable housing even in places that force a long commute and refuse to build higher density housing. That’s just the way it is. All the space between the lakes and the mountains is used up. The only place to go is up. The suburbia lifestyle isn’t possible everywhere. The wasatch front is getting to that point. This isn’t Phoenix, where there’s no lakes and no mountains, nothing but land. Older generations need to stop being so selfish about protecting their dear town from growing and changing. It only hurts their children and grandchildren who are priced out.

  • Third try screen name Mapleton, UT
    July 13, 2018 9:06 a.m.

    The devil is in the details.

    The petition might be accepted...or it might not. But the city holds all the cards. They decide if the decision was administrative or legislative in nature, based on the opinion of the city attorney.

    It is clear that the city has spoken. It is also clear that half the voters didn't like their decision.

    It seems to me the question is whether or not this group of organizers has the cash and stamina to fight city hall...all the way to the Utah Supreme Court.

    The city is NOT likely to bend here.

  • DrVenkman Alpine, UT
    July 13, 2018 8:47 a.m.

    I find it interesting that so many people complain about rising housing costs in Utah, but then complain about developments like this. The reality is that Utah is a much different place than it was 10 years ago and is growing very quickly. If we want more affordable housing, then developments like this need to move forward. It's simple supply and demand, really. One of the reasons why places like San Fransisco and Seattle are so expensive is that the government prevents more housing to be built and tons of people want to live there.

  • thebig1 Salt Lake City, UT
    July 13, 2018 8:45 a.m.

    Wow looks nice, guess if you love a big weedy field keep it

  • tqseal Liberal Central (Sugarhouse), UT
    July 13, 2018 8:40 a.m.

    Its the classic, "not in my backyard" argument for stopping development.

  • Thomas Thompson Salt Lake City, UT
    July 13, 2018 8:40 a.m.

    It seems to me that putting the matter "up to a vote" is not going to have any effect whatsoever on whether the project goes forward. Instead, if the folks signing the petition are serious, but best approach is to lobby the appropriate governmental officials to change the zoning for the area to one which would not permit the contemplated development. That's also fraught with peril, however, as the developer could perhaps then make a colorable claim that the change in zoning comes too late and leaves him in a position where he must suffer some pretty significant financial losses. It would be nice to see the whole area developed into a beautiful public park, but that could be seen as impractical because Holladay is one of our fastest growing urban areas, and the people who live there want a convenient place to go where they can get the services they need. In short, the new development may turn out to be the right thing to do given the practical needs of people who live in the surrounding areas.