Elizabeth Smart kidnapper Wanda Barzee denied parole

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  • HENDRY2 Fort Lauderdale, FL
    July 4, 2018 9:09 a.m.

    As a person who was a victim of a crime, where two people in our group were killed by a man "known to the police", there is this question: Is it not the purpose of a parole hearing to determine if the person has amended their life, and is sorry for the crime they committed?

    From news reports, the woman's refusal to attend her own hearing, and that she still believes her husband's actions against the victim were his way of choosing a second wife, means that Barzee has neither amended her life, nor is sorry for the suffering brought on the victim or her family, however, whether her opinion is caused by mental illness or is of her own conscious decision is not entirely known.

    From what I'm reading as outlined in the plea agreement her prison time has ended, but is still confined to a mental hospital for her own safety, and for the safety of the victim and the community.

    There's more to this outcome than just saying "it's her right to be released" - it's also the right of the victim and her family to live without fear of retaliation from this woman or her husband.

  • mrjj69 bountiful, UT
    July 4, 2018 2:38 a.m.

    The fact she refused to attend her parole hearing. Speaks volumes.

  • Brave Sir Robin San Diego, CA
    July 3, 2018 8:39 p.m.

    @Weston

    "By the time she gets out she'll be 76 or 77, and without assets or family support. She'll live out her remaining days in a homeless shelter or on the street. That may be even worse than a life sentence."

    Doesn't matter. It's not up to the justice system to determine that. If she has served her sentence, she should be released, period. Keeping her in prison longer is a crime against the constitution.

  • twinkleberry67 Layton, UT
    July 3, 2018 4:26 p.m.

    Ms. Barzee is certainly mentally ill and needs to be in an environment that is both safe for her and society at large. Unfortunately she is one of the lucky ones. If these individuals haven’t been convicted of a crime, most end up wasting away on the streets because they are unable to work and end up getting kicked out of the subsidized housing system due to their unwillingness or inability to conform to the rules of these places. Psychological help for these individuals is scarce at best and due to the stigma associated with it, many people refuse help for these conditions. It is profoundly tragic that these individuals have to devolve to being a danger to society before they can be put in an environment that is both safe for them and the care they so desperately need is available. I wish they didn’t have to devolve to this dismal condition before they get the care they so desperately need. I don’t know what is worse, lack of mental health of these people, or the busted system in place to deal with it.

  • Weston Jurney West Jordan, UT
    July 3, 2018 7:54 a.m.

    By the time she gets out she'll be 76 or 77, and without assets or family support. She'll live out her remaining days in a homeless shelter or on the street. That may be even worse than a life sentence.

  • BYUalum South Jordan, UT
    July 3, 2018 7:35 a.m.

    She is housed and locked up in the Utah Mental Health Hospital not in the Utah Prison. She could never contribute to society and would probably live on the street if released.

  • Scott1 Salt Lake City, UT
    July 3, 2018 12:46 a.m.

    Denied parole? Good.

  • byufootballrocks Salt Lake City, UT
    July 2, 2018 11:13 p.m.

    Sounds like a form of "double jeopardy."
    She served her 15 years, she should be released. That's it.
    You can't invent a reason after the fact for keeping someone there longer than their sentence, that's wrong, that's not following the law.

  • Sanefan Wellsville, UT
    July 2, 2018 7:12 p.m.

    She should never, ever come out of prison. It should be her 'final home."