In our opinion: A new Utah national park leaves too many questions unanswered

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  • Husker2 Aspen, CO
    Dec. 13, 2017 7:21 a.m.

    @marxist "We also need a serious discussion about governance of land Native Americans believe sacred, e.g. Bears Ears, which in the case of Bears Ears was their possession a mere 150 YEARS AGO!"

    If it's federal government property but it's sacred to Native Americans, that creates quite the "separation of church and state" quandary for people who believe in such things. I'm not sure Liberals want to go there.

  • Weston Jurney West Jordan, UT
    Dec. 12, 2017 2:49 p.m.

    "Zion's" National Park? Really? I always thought it was just "Zion National Park." But then, I don't work for the Deseret News.

  • marxist Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 12, 2017 2:16 p.m.

    Since most of you aren't addressing this issue, let me repeat:

    We also need a serious discussion about governance of land Native Americans believe sacred, e.g. Bears Ears, which in the case of Bears Ears was their possession a mere 150 YEARS AGO!

    Governance was an important part of the Bears Ears monument.

  • imsmarterthanyou Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 12, 2017 1:06 p.m.

    I am 100% against a new national park. That is worse than the "monument." All it does is lock up the land and fill it up with cops and deny the people of utah the right to use the land for ATV riding, camping, and even coal mining or oil drilling. I vote we keep the land for use by the people who live near by and kick the federal government out! They can take their fees, picknick tables, rules, restrooms, & visitor centers to kentucky or california. We already have too much of that here.

  • majmajor Layton, UT
    Dec. 12, 2017 12:23 p.m.

    A National Park is the right answer. If the nation thinks that the beauty needs to be preserved the right answer is to transfer the land to the US Park Service, or Indian reservation land, and fund it.

    Monuments are presidential decrees that are worth less then the paper that created them or reduced them. It doesn’t allow a cent of federal dollars to do anything to protect, or maintain it. The Park Service has to be funded to support a new Park.

    The land under Obama’s and Clinton declaration is still all BLM land there was never a change in ownership. Don’t worry, the Federal Government still owns 2/3 of the land in Utah. That is a topic that should be argued in a real discussion.

    Monument creation reduction just makes the President’s party feel better without requiring the courage to discuss/obtain ANY federal funds.

  • byronbca Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 12, 2017 10:16 a.m.

    Too many Utahns see Utah's supreme natural beauty as a curse because it means less mining and grazing. If Utah really wants to make investments in itself and create jobs that can never be exported then embrace what this state is: a tourism Mecca.

    Yes Utah needs more National Parks and it blatantly obvious to everyone who visits here, eventually locals will figure it out too.

  • stevo123 Driggs, ID
    Dec. 12, 2017 9:37 a.m.

    I find the State take over of Hole in the Rock to be particularly questionable.

  • marxist Salt Lake City, UT
    Dec. 12, 2017 9:08 a.m.

    "... what the nation needs is a serious discussion about its natural wonders and how best to cherish and preserve them."

    We also need a serious discussion about governance of land Native Americans believe sacred, e.g. Bears Ears, which in the case of Bears Ears was their possession a mere 150 YEARS AGO!

    For Native Americans Bears Ears was in part an attempt to regain some control over what had been stolen from them, a universal experience for aboriginal populations the world over.

  • toosmartforyou Kaysville, UT
    Dec. 12, 2017 8:01 a.m.

    When did affordability ever enter into any question before the US Congress? Certainly not in my life time or that of my late grandfather, who was born in 1889. Why start now?

  • JKR Holladay, UT
    Dec. 12, 2017 6:40 a.m.

    True story. Can you imagine Calf Creek, Horse Canyon, and Coyote Gulch within a new national park? These places would be full of tourists and the Hole in the Rock road would be paved. The towns of Escalante and Boulder would become gateways like Springdale. The important thing is to preserve the wilderness character of these areas, and those on Cedar Mesa with so many Anasazi ruins. A new national park would be counterproductive.