While Irma raged, 11,000 Mormon volunteers worked to save Texas homes

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  • Seagull Suz Sandy, UT
    Sept. 12, 2017 11:36 p.m.

    ...this statement makes my heart happy:

    "We’re not just the keepers of our brothers in the church, we are our brother’s keeper," said Elder Daniel W. Jones.

    God bless ALL of the people working in the muck and mire , the food lines, and clothing and other life sustaining supplies distribution areas...

  • amagnetick AV, CA
    Sept. 12, 2017 2:53 p.m.

    @UtahTroutStalker and Impartial7... if you don't like the reports about Mormons helping out in disasters, don't read this newspaper. You do know that it serves a mostly LDS population don't you? If you don't want to see stuff like this about the LDS church go read the NYT, LA Times or many other larger newspapers, you won't see much like this there.

    It says a lot about people like yourselves, complaining about people who are doing good in the world. Your bias against the LDS church is shining brightly. I personally don't care who is doing the good work, if they're out there trying to help, they deserve credit if someone wants to give it to them.

  • Tyrex Austin, TX
    Sept. 12, 2017 2:22 p.m.

    It is heartbreaking to see what these families are dealing with. Houston has mostly been pushed off the front pages but this remains a major story. This past weekend members from our stake worked an area west of Houston and will continue for weeks to come. It was heartwarming to see the response from the community; hundreds of trucks and cars with tools and volunteers descended on the neighborhood, creating gridlock. The water had recently receded; there was mud in the streets and the houses were wet. Many families lost everything. Some still appeared to be in shock. The work was hard but Mormons worked side-by-side with Muslims, JWs and members from other faiths and relief orgs, many wearing shirts or vests identifying their affiliation; there was nothing but good will. In the midst of so much pain and devastation it was an uplifting experience and many residents were overcome with gratitude. Their road to recovery remains long and difficult. There is still much to be done and little time. To the armchair rock-throwers, come and join us. There is room for everyone to help.

  • HaHaHaHa Othello, WA
    Sept. 12, 2017 1:20 p.m.

    "A righteous government would provide the basics for human survival to its citizens. A righteous religion would demand it."

    Which prophet said this?

    "You know who else is helping? 100,000 Southern Baptists. 100,000 Catholics. A million Methodists and Presbyterians"

    Source please? Sitting at your kitchen table in a SLC suburb (or anywhere USA), writing a check for donation, doesn't really count as the kind of volunteering that the article is citing.

  • KevinSim Springville, UT
    Sept. 12, 2017 12:29 p.m.

    Ssev posted:

    =A righteous government would provide the basics for human survival to its
    =citizens. A righteous religion would demand it.

    Ssev, I've responded to this statement in other threads and you've never answered my question. Why do we need the middleman? Why do we need the government to act as a middleman? Why doesn't what you call a righteous religion just "provide the basics for human survival" itself? In a nation with enough freedom to allow its citizens to contribute to good causes, what is keeping those citizens themselves from providing those basics, like the LDS humanitarian services is doing?

  • KevinSim Springville, UT
    Sept. 12, 2017 12:24 p.m.

    UtahTroutStalker posted:

    =Wow, this is so similar to stories I am hearing about Catholics, Evangelicals,
    =Muslims, and Jewish folks helping people in Texas and Florida.
    =
    =I guess the main difference is the glory hounding.

    If nobody knows the good one particular group is doing, including other members of that group, doesn't that have the potential to make the good that group is doing kind of temporary? The people in that group contribute to society for the duration of their lives, but they don't inspire others to do the same after their lives are over. What's wrong with documenting the good they're doing, so that other people, within that group or without, feel inspired to carry on the good done after their lives are over?

  • wayneincalif Huntington Beach, CA
    Sept. 12, 2017 11:43 a.m.

    Warning to all working in disaster areas. Make sure to wear masks that are certified for 'asbestos'. The air will be filled with it and the 'Dust' masks are not suitable. A friend of mine found out later when he went to a previous disaster in New Orleans and now is worried.

  • Jumpyman Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 12, 2017 11:36 a.m.

    Impartial, I don't see you there helping out, but instead just bashing yellow shirts. You might be more grateful if your home was one of those where the yellow shirts showed up to help!!

  • Craig Clark Boulder, CO
    Sept. 12, 2017 10:44 a.m.

    It's inspiring when people come together to aid their fellow man in the aftermath of a disaster that kills some and leaves others suffering. It doesn't matter what religion they belong to or if they have no religion at all. It's humanity at its best working together.

  • Impartial7 DRAPER, UT
    Sept. 12, 2017 10:16 a.m.

    Glad they're helping, but quit blowing your own horn. You know who else is helping? 100,000 Southern Baptists. 100,000 Catholics. A million Methodists and Presbyterians. The difference? They're not all wearing matching shirts and looking for a photo op.

  • generalM Frannie, WY
    Sept. 12, 2017 10:05 a.m.

    We have two sons living in the Houston area. One, with his young family, escaped any storm damage. The other lost his car, but his belongings are all OK. Both are involved in the Mormon Helping Hands clean-up efforts, and both say the spirit of brotherhood and love is as powerful as anything they have ever felt. I am so grateful for the LDS Church--its organization and committed members--who reach out to serve all God's children. I'm grateful as well for all God-fearing people who serve so unselfishly. Blessings come to both the givers and the receivers.

  • UtahTroutStalker Draper, UT
    Sept. 12, 2017 10:04 a.m.

    Wow, this is so similar to stories I am hearing about Catholics, Evangelicals, Muslims, and Jewish folks helping people in Texas and Florida.

    I guess the main difference is the glory hounding.

  • ssev Maple Grove, MN
    Sept. 12, 2017 9:11 a.m.

    “On Saturday and Sunday, more than 10,000 Mormon Helping Hands volunteers mucked out the homes of anyone who asked. … ‘We’re not just the keepers of our brothers in the church, we are our brother’s keeper’ . …”

    If we truly are “our brother’s keeper,” then would we not also want to treat the “least” among us the way that Christ expected in Matthew 25? Would we not ensure that every human being who is “an hungred” has “meat,” “thirsty” has “drink”; “naked” are “clothed”; and “sick” and “in prison” are “visited”?

    A righteous government would provide the basics for human survival to its citizens. A righteous religion would demand it.

  • Flashback Kearns, UT
    Sept. 12, 2017 7:20 a.m.

    The Mormons taking care of business when needed.

  • Capsaicin Salt Lake City, UT
    Sept. 11, 2017 8:13 p.m.

    I'm glad they're helping. But I'd rather see them in full hazmat suit and respirator like you'd see the pro's wearing. Older homes can contain lead paint, asbestos etc. If the home was already full of mold, they're bringing it home with them on their clothes, contaminating their tents, sleeping bags, cars, etc etc. No way I'd even consider helping muck out a flooded or burned home without full hazmat suit and respirator. I'd definitely help remove trees and other debris however.

  • MoreMan San Diego, CA
    Sept. 11, 2017 6:34 p.m.

    I've criticized the Mormon Church for many things in my day but this isn't one of them. The volunteer spirit and hard work and kind generosity of the MEMBERS always shines thru. I'm sure the victims are eternally grateful. Now about those bright yellow shirts. ;)

  • Nan BW ELder, CO
    Sept. 11, 2017 6:26 p.m.

    I admire so much all those who are helping, of whatever religion and background. I can't go help with the clean-up, but I pray for all those affected, and all those helping, and I am grateful I can send donations to various groups in which I have confidence. Most of us can do something. However, getting right in the trenches and working hard is being an amazing Disciple of Jesus Christ, and I thank all those wonderful volunteers.

  • gtaj Katy, TX
    Sept. 11, 2017 6:18 p.m.

    All the work is truly appreciated