Many governors welcome demise of GOP health care bill

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  • Liberal On Planet Zion SLC, UT
    March 28, 2017 11:32 a.m.

    @worf - McAllen, TX

    Re: "Some very good ways to cut healthcare cost"

    1. Eat a good diet
    2. Regular exercise
    3. Get plenty of sleep
    4. Stay away from smoking, drinking, and drugs.
    5. Be smart and stay away from Texas
    6. Avoid pregnancies until it's affordable, and a person is mature enough to care for the baby.

    Re: "These would greatly reduce the price of healthcare".

    Life in McCallen...Daily statements such as the above not only show a complete lack of understanding subject matter but a total and complete disconnect altogether. Does your #6 example pertain to those of a certain religious sect that often have children immediately after the weeding ceremony is completed?

  • PamFlinders Sandy, UT
    March 27, 2017 12:55 a.m.

    @Worf I do appreciate your "bootstrap" mentality, but honestly you could get cancer at any time. I would happily pay my insurance premium even if I never used a cent, if it meant you could get the help you needed.

    The most efficient way of using tax dollars are to focus on preventative care and covering everyone's basic needs. People get better, go back to work, manage their health with a doctor instead of putting it off until it's too late.

    The least efficient way is to not cover millions of people; they will eventually go to the emergency room and never pay the astronomical bills. That just makes everyone's premiums go up.

    Either way - you are going to pay for your neighbor's healthcare.
    The question is do you want to do it the smart way or the backwards way?

  • worf McAllen, TX
    March 27, 2017 12:12 a.m.

    Fred44,

    Since when is social security free stuff? It's a liberal mandated investment which they have robbed.

    As for having government stealing from its citizens, to give me free stuff. My hands are clean, and I'm not a crook.

  • Fred44 Salt Lake City, Utah
    March 26, 2017 4:54 p.m.

    Worf,

    Well done deflection. If you are taking social security and medicare and you retired in 1980 you will likely get 300% of what you paid into social security and medicare. If you retired in 2010 you are likely to get 25-50% more than what you put in but that could go higher depending on the future cost of health care. I will stand by my statement that you are getting free stuff from the government unless you declined to take Social Security and Medicaid Benefits.

    My recollection is that you said you were a school teacher in Texas which means that you have a guaranteed state pension in which you will likely collect a significant amount more than you put in. Now I am a teacher as well and I will collect a state pension in Utah someday that will be much larger hopefully (hope to live a good 20 years after retirement) than money that I put in.

    If you declined your social security benefit, your medicare and your state pension, then you are correct, you are not getting any free stuff.

    The faster we get over the "free stuff" argument, the better off we will be.

  • worf McAllen, TX
    March 26, 2017 10:36 a.m.

    Fred44,

    What free stuff? I wouldn't take a cent from you:

    * I've paid my way through college, and have put much more into the system than I'll ever receive. Like Mr Trump, I've made investments which are paying off today in retirement. And no! I don't feel greedy for having done this. It's the American dream!

    * I keep myself healthy, and haven't needed healthcare. I take responsibility for myself, and absolutely won't take free stuff. I've even paid my parents back for everything. Many folks feel this way, and work/earn for what they get. They don't sit around blaming others.

    LOU Montana,

    Do you know what a doctor must pay for malpractice insurance, medical equipment, their education, professional aides/with benefits, and federal regulations? It's not cheap, and many doctors are leaving the profession, because they can't afford the cost.

  • GaryO Virginia Beach, VA
    March 26, 2017 8:41 a.m.

    Hey Unrepetent Progressive -

    RE: "What we need to do is mimic what other successful western style democracies do: have some sort of universal coverage for all."

    Yes, we should. That would be smart. The best practices of others should be adopted by us.

    That's the way knowledge has been disseminated through the millennia. There is no need to reinvent the wheel every time a problem presents itself. Just look around and see how other people have solved that problem. And then modify that solution to our particular situation. That is just common sense.

    BUT our "Conservative" propagandists keep insisting that "American Exceptionalism" should reign supreme, and we therefore CANNOT adopt the best practices discovered by others. That, of course, DEFIES common sense.

    Pragmatism tells us that single payer health care system is what works best. And we already have that to an extent. That's what Medicare is.

    To senseless "Conservative thinkers," common sense should be avoided in order to reinforce a rigid and unworkable ideology.

    It really is time for a change.

  • 10CC Bountiful, UT
    March 26, 2017 7:53 a.m.

    @worf - those are all excellent recommendations for how to live as healthy a life as possible. I do all these, myself.

    Just as a recent VP said about energy, "personal conservation is great, but it can't be the basis for a national energy policy", encouraging people to live healthy lifestyles is not a replacement for health insurance.

    The larger question is why so many Americans have such an unhealthy lifestyle?

    I would submit it is stress and anxiety - including (paradoxically) anxiety about having no health insurance - that leads people to comfort foods, which leads to a sedentary lifestyle. Other factors exist, without a doubt.

    Tax payer expenses will drop as more people live healthy lifestyles, unquestionably.

  • LOU Montana Pueblo, CO
    March 26, 2017 6:32 a.m.

    Worf,

    Add to your list the removal of ridiculously huge profits in the medical system. It is all our money and the profit margins are out of control.

    Let me put it into a context republicans can understand: First we give tax breaks to the rich and then we remove the ridiculously huge profits.

    Does that sound better?

  • Fred44 Salt Lake City, Utah
    March 26, 2017 6:19 a.m.

    Worf,

    I believe from earlier posts in other places you have indicated that you are retired. If you are older than 65 I am betting you are on medicare. Why should I have to pay for your free stuff? The problem with republicans is that they are not opposed to free stuff, they only want certain people to have free stuff (senior citizens, wealthy). Free stuff is free stuff. When we open the door to covering one group of people then it becomes very difficult to close that door.

    We must focus on two things providing world class health care and providing it at an affordable price. The only way to accomplish the second one is to regulate the cost, republicans will never be able to figure that one out. Look profits for big pharmaceutical and insurance companies in the last eight years, they are setting records. Free market solutions are not the answer when the market will NEVER be free based on the fact that some people will be covered by the government no matter what. As our senior citizen population grows so will Medicare and that is not going away. Health care is different than other purchases such as food, cars etc. The sooner we accept that the better off we will be.

  • RC in WJ WEST JORDAN, UT
    March 25, 2017 9:35 p.m.

    Re: Worf

    Finally we agree! Both posts dead on! Thanks for the insight.

  • unrepentant progressive Bozeman, MT
    March 25, 2017 7:34 p.m.

    We all end up paying one another's health bills one way or another. No one is going to bleed in the streets for lack of insurance. Only a fool denies this.

    What we need to do is mimic what other successful western style democracies do: have some sort of universal coverage for all.

    Just what is so difficult about this concept Republicans?

  • worf McAllen, TX
    March 25, 2017 5:08 p.m.

    Some very good ways to cut healthcare cost:

    1. Eat a good diet
    2. Regular exercise
    3. Get plenty of sleep
    4. Stay away from smoking, drinking, and drugs.
    5. Be smart
    6. Avoid pregnancies until it's affordable, and a person is mature enough to care for the baby.

    These would greatly reduce the price of healthcare.

  • GaryO Virginia Beach, VA
    March 25, 2017 4:14 p.m.

    Republicans politicians are a threat to themselves and others.

    They are ALL talk and absolutely NO substance.

  • Hutterite American Fork, UT
    March 25, 2017 2:59 p.m.

    Obamacare is how not to do it. Trumpcare was worse. There's only one conclusion we're going to come to about how to make health care work, but it's a painful journey.

  • cmsense Kaysville, UT
    March 25, 2017 11:33 a.m.

    Governors are closer to the people.

    It seems a lot of legelslators are out of touch.

    My premiums are almost more than my 15 year mortgage. Lucky I have a good job that pays well. My options this year were to pay over my mortage by $400 a month or to sign up for an HSA account with $5000 deductable. We are also lucky we are healthy so hopefully adding a large deductable will save us money.

    Point is, we are a first world country, and our health system costs have gotten so out of whack half of the population either plain can't afford it or needs large subsidies or programs to do so.

    The GOP plan was to say in essence, "let them eat cake" or go without. Cut benefits to the poor and give Billionaires and millionaires a fatter tax loophole with lower taxes on thier dividends and capital gains at almost a trillion dollars less tax.

    There is a difference between cutting benefits vs cutting costs. Legalizing health plans that don't cover basic care for the poor, but fat no limit tax deductions to the cadiallac health plans for the wealthy.

    17% approval, I'm surprised it was that high.

  • one vote Salt Lake City, UT
    March 25, 2017 10:33 a.m.

    Everyone enjoys the failure of total hype over truth and substance.

  • worf McAllen, TX
    March 25, 2017 10:25 a.m.

    When all is said and done.

    Financing healthcare come from the pocketbooks of the citizens.

    Someone will get robbed, another will be subsidized, and someone will gain a prophet.

    It's how the pie is sliced.