Courtesy of the LDS Church

Elder David A. Bednar was 52 years old when he was called to be a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles. On June 15, 2016, he celebrates his 64th birthday. He was born in 1952 in Oakland, California.

Elder Bednar and his wife, Susan, are the parents of three sons. Prior to being called as an apostle, he served in a number of capacities within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, including as an Area Seventy, a stake president and a bishop.

The information in this quiz has been compiled from biographical articles written about Elder Bednar, as well as talks he has given.

Question #1
Courtesy of the LDS Church

When was Elder Bednar's father baptized as a member of the LDS Church?

a. A year before Elder Bednar was born
b. When Elder Bednar was 7 years old
c. While Elder Bednar was serving a mission
d. After Elder Bednar was married

Answer
Courtesy of the LDS Church

d. After Elder Bednar was married

Elder Bednar has often talked about his father. He spoke of his father in his April 2012 general conference address, "The Powers of Heaven."

"I was reared in a home with a faithful mother and a wonderful father. My mom was a descendant of pioneers who sacrificed everything for the church and kingdom of God. My dad was not a member of our church and, as a young man, had desired to become a Catholic priest. Ultimately, he elected not to attend theological seminary and instead pursued a career as a tool and die maker.

"For much of his married life, my father attended meetings of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints with our family. In fact, many of the people in our ward had no idea that my dad was not a member of the church. He played on and coached our ward softball team, helped with Scout activities, and supported my mother in her various callings and responsibilities. I want to tell you about one of the great lessons I learned from my father about priesthood authority and power.

"As a boy I asked my dad many times each week when he was going to be baptized. He responded lovingly but firmly each time I pestered him: 'David, I am not going to join the church for your mother, for you or for anyone else. I will join the church when I know it is the right thing to do.'"

A November 2004 Ensign article shares the rest of the story.

"It was after the couple’s marriage, in the late 1970s, that Elder Bednar received a long-hoped-for phone call. It was his father asking him to come home to California to perform a baptism — his own."

In that same Ensign article, Elder Bednar shared the following quote: "I honestly believe that’s why I was born. Not to teach (my father), but to assist him in learning about the restored gospel."

Question #2
Courtesy of the LDS Church

Which church leader told a story during a Brigham Young University-Idaho devotional about Elder Bednar when he was a young missionary?

a. President Gordon B. Hinckley
b. President Boyd K. Packer
c. President Henry B. Eyring
d. President Thomas S. Monson

Answer
IRI

b. President Boyd K. Packer

During a BYU-Idaho devotional on March 12, 2002, President Packer told of an interaction he had with Elder Bednar years before, when Elder Bednar was serving as a young missionary.

The story was summarized on LDS.org following President Packer's passing in 2015.

"In Germany in the early 1970s, Elder Packer and his wife had to travel by train from Munich to Berlin overnight to fulfill one of his church assignments. Two young missionaries had taken them to the train. As it was pulling out of the station, one of those young elders asked through the window if Elder Packer had any German money. When Elder Packer responded no, the missionary, running alongside the train, handed him a 20-mark note.

"A few hours later, that 20-mark note proved crucial to finishing their journey safely. It helped change the mind of an East German soldier, who could have put Sister Packer off the train and arrested her because her older type of passport was not accepted by his government.

"The young missionary who had handed that 20-mark note to a visiting apostle was David A. Bednar, who, some 30 years later, would serve with President Packer in the Quorum of the Twelve."

Question #3
Courtesy of the LDS Church

Whose knowledge of the scriptures inspired Elder Bednar as a young missionary to use the scriptures in teaching?

a. President Boyd K. Packer
b. Elder Neal A. Maxwell
c. President Harold B. Lee
d. President David O. McKay

Answer
IRI

c. President Harold B. Lee

“During my training before my mission, we went to the solemn assembly room in the Salt Lake Temple. President Harold B. Lee was there to answer questions from about 300 missionaries," Elder Bednar recalled in a biographical article written by President Henry B. Eyring. "He stood there in his white suit, holding his white scriptures. He answered every question from the scriptures, or he said, 'I don't know.' I sat there and thought that I would never be able to know the scriptures the way he did, but my objective became to use the scriptures in my teaching the way that I saw President Harold B. Lee do it. That desire is the genesis of all my scripture study.”

Question #4
Courtesy of the LDS Church

Which item of clothing did Elder Bednar say he once used for an object lesson?

a. Suspenders
b. A handkerchief
c. A pair of socks
d. A glove

Answer
Courtesy of the LDS Church

a. Suspenders

"I went into Primary one Sunday," Elder Bednar is quoted as saying in the profile written by President Eyring. "They had invited me. I decided to wear red suspenders. I thought that I would somehow use them as an object lesson. So I got in the Primary room, took off my coat and said, 'Now, boys and girls, the bishop has these red suspenders. How are the scriptures like my red suspenders?' And one little boy raised his hand and said, 'The scriptures hold up our faith in Jesus the same way your suspenders hold up your pants.' I said, 'That is exactly right.' The little boys in the ward started wearing red suspenders, and the little girls had red bows in their hair."

Question #5
Mormon Newsroom

Where did Elder Bednar meet his wife, Susan?

a. At a family home evening activity at BYU
b. In a class at BYU
c. In church, where they were both assigned to speak on the same Sunday
d. At a service project at BYU

Answer
Deseret News

a. At a family home evening activity at BYU

Elder Bednar met then-Susan K. Robinson, an education major, while he was a student at BYU during a family home evening activity.

"One Monday night their family home evening groups got together to play a game of flag football," according to a biography about Elder Bednar on LDS.org. "Susan was on the receiving end of a long pass by Elder Bednar, who had been a quarterback for his high school team. He was very impressed by her catch, but he didn’t know that the pass reception was the only one she can remember ever catching."

Question #6
Deseret News

Elder Bednar was a professor at which two universities?

a. University of Arkansas and Auburn University
b. The University of Alabama and Purdue University
c. University of Arkansas and Texas Tech University
d. The University of Alabama and Texas Tech University

Answer
IRI

c. University of Arkansas and Texas Tech University

Elder Bednar worked as a professor at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville as well as Texas Tech University over the course of 17 years in several capacities.

He began at the University of Arkansas as an assistant professor of management before working at Texas Tech as an assistant professor for two years. He returned to Arkansas as the associate dean for graduate studies and eventually assumed a position as director of the Management Decision-Making Lab from 1992 to 1997.

Question #7
Erik Isakson

What did Elder Bednar encourage members of his stake and students at BYU-Idaho to always bring to meetings?

a. A notebook
b. The "For The Strength of Young" pamphlet
c. An Articles of Faith card
d. Their scriptures

Answer
Courtesy of the LDS Church

d. Their scriptures

As the president of BYU-Idaho, Elder Bednar was known for encouraging students to bring their scriptures to campus devotionals, but he developed a conviction of the importance of having scriptures on hand years before, according to the Ensign.

" 'My dad was a tool-and-die maker, and he would never be caught without his tools. It seemed to me that for members of The Church of Jesus Christ our tools are the scriptures and we would always have them in our meetings. When I became the stake president, we began to hold them up to remind us how they can, if we use them, hold up our faith.'

"Years after Elder Bednar left Arkansas, a man walked into a priesthood interview in a rural stake in Idaho. He was carrying a well-worn set of scriptures. He noticed that the general authority conducting the interview seemed curious about the scriptures he was holding so carefully. He smiled, held the scriptures up and said, 'When I was young, I was a soldier in the army in Arkansas. I was in President Bednar’s stake. I feel better when I have my scriptures with me.' "

Question #8
Courtesy of the LDS Church

Which change did NOT take place while Elder Bednar was president of BYU-Idaho?

a. The school, formerly known as Ricks College, became a four-year university called BYU-Idaho
b. The school phased out its involvement in intercollegiate athletics
c. The track system was implemented
d. The Rexburg Idaho Temple was dedicated

Answer
Courtesy of the LDS Church

d. The Rexburg Idaho Temple was dedicated

Elder Bednar began his presidency in 1997, when the school was known as Ricks College, and he left the position in 2004, after the school had become known as BYU-Idaho.

The Rexburg Temple was announced in 2003, while Elder Bednar was president of the university, but it wasn't dedicated until 2008.

The other changes did take place while Elder Bednar was president of BYU-Idaho. In his first talk in general conference, Elder Bednar shared his perspective on Ricks College becoming BYU-Idaho:

"On the night of June 20, 2000, several colleagues and I were working late in the executive offices of then Ricks College in Rexburg, Idaho. We were making final preparations for an unexpected and historic assembly on our campus the next morning and the announcement by President Hinckley that Ricks College would become a baccalaureate-degree-granting institution and take on the name of Brigham Young University–Idaho. As an administrative team we were just beginning to realize the monumental nature of the responsibility and challenges that were before us.

"As we walked out of the building that night, one of my colleagues asked, 'President, are you scared?' As best as I can recall, I answered something like this: 'If I thought we had to execute this transition relying exclusively upon our own experience and our own judgment, then I would be terrified. But we will have help from heaven. Because we know who is in charge and that we are not alone, then no, I am not scared.' And we who serve at BYU–Idaho unitedly testify that there has been help from heaven, miracles have occurred, revelations have been received, doors have been opened, and we have been greatly blessed as individuals and as an institution."

Question #9
Courtesy of the LDS Church

How much time passed from when his apostolic call was extended by President Gordon B. Hinckley to when he was sustained in general conference?

a. Less than 24 hours
b. Less than 48 hours
c. One week
d. One month

Answer
Deseret News

a. Less than 24 hours

Elder Bednar has spoken several times about receiving the apostolic call less than 24 hours before he was sustained in general conference. President Hinckley extended the call on Oct. 1, 2004. Elder Bednar was sustained on Oct. 2, 2004, and then ordained and set apart as a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles on Oct. 7, 2004.

“I think I know better than anyone that within The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints there are literally hundreds and thousands of men better qualified, more able than I,” Elder Bednar said of his call. “But I do know from whence the call has come. And so I’m honored to respond. I look forward to serving, and I’m anxious for the opportunity to be able to learn.”

Question #10
Courtesy of the LDS Church

What is Elder Bednar's favorite hymn?

a. "I Believe in Christ"
b. "I Know That My Redeemer Lives"
c. "The Spirit of God"
d. "Redeemer of Israel"

Answer
AP Images

d. "Redeemer of Israel"

In his April 2005 general conference talk, "The Tender Mercies of the Lord," Elder Bednar recounted his first experience speaking in general conference:

"This afternoon I want to describe and discuss a spiritual impression I received a few moments before I stepped to this pulpit during the Sunday morning session of general conference last October. Elder Dieter F. Uchtdorf had just finished speaking and had declared his powerful witness of the Savior. Then we all stood together to sing the intermediate hymn that previously had been announced by President Gordon B. Hinckley. The intermediate hymn that morning was 'Redeemer of Israel' (Hymns, no. 6).

"Now, the music for the various conference sessions had been determined many weeks before — and obviously long before my new call to serve. If, however, I had been invited to suggest an intermediate hymn for that particular session of the conference — a hymn that would have been both edifying and spiritually soothing for me and for the congregation before my first address in this Conference Center — I would have selected my favorite hymn, 'Redeemer of Israel.' Tears filled my eyes as I stood with you to sing that stirring hymn of the Restoration.

"Near the conclusion of the singing, to my mind came this verse from the Book of Mormon: 'But behold, I, Nephi, will show unto you that the tender mercies of the Lord are over all those whom he hath chosen, because of their faith, to make them mighty even unto the power of deliverance' (1 Ne. 1:20)."

Question #11
Welden Andersen, IRI 2014

Which of the following is NOT the title of a book authored by Elder Bednar?

a. "Ask in Faith"
b. "Power to Become"
c. "Act in Doctrine"
d. "Increase in Learning"

Answer
Deseret Book

a. "Ask in Faith"

Elder Bednar has penned three books: "Power to Become," "Act in Doctrine" and "Increase in Learning." All three have been published by Deseret Book.