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Topics discussed during Brigham Young University's Campus Education Week, held Aug. 17-21, ranged from home organization to temple typologies.

But two particularly common topics were marriage and family relationships.

After attending six sessions related to these two topics, DeseretNews.com reporters compiled tips for those who may be looking for a relationship or who are currently in one.

Click through to find advice on determining whom to marry, understanding what true love is, learning how to deal with conflict and more.

What to look for in a potential spouse
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"Attraction is vastly more than skin deep."

"Find someone who is kind and understanding by nature."

"Find someone who puts others' needs very high on their priority list."

"Find someone who understands family as God does."



"Find someone who really loves God."



"Find someone who regularly, meaningfully talks to Heavenly Father."

"Find someone who home teaches or visit teaches."



-Michael Goodman, "Is This Someone I Should Consider for Marriage?" BYU Education Week 2015

Red flags to look for in the person you're dating
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"We need to see each other in a variety of circumstances. We need to see them not simply when they’re making goo-goo eyes at us."



"The key to judging character in relation to mankind lies in how they treat others they are not trying to impress — especially family members and those they are not pleased with."



"If they are someone who is cold to others, they will be cold to you. Look how they treat others, especially mom and dad, brothers and sisters."



-Michael Goodman, "Is This Someone I Should Consider for Marriage?" BYU Education Week 2015

What "true love" means
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Love requires time. Love requires action. It is something that we choose.



You don’t feel love before you begin to show it. Feeling is the result, not the cause.



True love is always involved in selflessness or charity.



It has two characteristics: It has depth and passion.



Very little love can come from one who is not at peace with himself or herself and God.



Love is a process.



-Michael Goodman, "What 'True Love' Is and Deciding Whom to Marry," BYU Education Week 2015

Life after marriage
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"When people say they don’t fight, I think they’re lying or that one person is getting completely steamrolled. Both are bad."

"You will never criticize someone into becoming wonderful. It just doesn’t work that way."

"If either partner has a heart rate above 100 beats per minute, they should not talk to each other."



-Scott Braithwaite, "Predictors of Marital Success That We Can Know Prior to Saying 'I Do,' ” BYU Education Week 2015

How to deal with conflict
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"Calm yourself first."

"Begin with a softened startup and honest goodwill."

"Don’t start saying, 'I’m going to make you do this.' "

"Listen, seek to understand and validate (LUV)."

"Stay focused: Keep the issue small enough that you can go deep enough."

"Maintain respect and concern: [The Family] Proclamation says we need to be equal partners."



-Stephen Duncan, "Respectfully Handle Differences and Solve Problems," BYU Education Week 2015

How to deal with conflict
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"Learn to make and receive repair attempts."

"Soothe yourself and each other. Hold each other's hands, rub each other’s backs. There are so many ways to soothe."

"Reach a consensus about a solution; reach something you both feel good about."

"Afterward, show an increase of love. Tell them you’re better together than independent."



-Stephen Duncan, "Respectfully Handle Differences and Solve Problems," BYU Education Week 2015

Everyday tips to improve your marriage
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Cut yourself and your spouse some slack:

"There are certain emotional reactions that happen that you cannot control. Now, real quickly, that does not mean I lose it and hit people. … I can control my behavioral response, but I cannot control my emotional reaction up to the point where I’m aware. If I’m in danger of feeling like I’m going to get hurt, my body will react, and then I’m aware of my reactions. We’ve got to cut ourselves some slack, and we really have to cut our spouses some slack."

Recall and focus on positive events:

"Negative events are more powerful and easier to recall because protection comes first. … We need to put forth some effort and list our positive events. List the things that are important to us and the positive attributes that go with those. You keep focusing on them, you keep looking for them."

Take ownership and share with Heavenly Father:

“Have you told Heavenly Father what’s going on? … Why? He’s all-knowing. He knows it already. ... I think that’s part of taking ownership. And we have that additional resource.”

-Lee N. Johnson, "What Can You Do to Improve Your Marriage?" BYU Education Week 2015

Everyday tips to improve your marriage

Reduce stress with a hobby:

"Find something you enjoy doing. Find ways to reduce your stress. ... We plan our schedule around our hobby, not the other way around. We don’t let it detract from family; family comes first. But you have to plan it. It’s not just going to happen. ... Find what works for you. The key is you don’t want to overschedule your lives, but I think we don’t plan for things that give us the best chance, that will make us successful in our relationships."

Get regular exercise:

"When people exercise regularly, what happens to their resting heart rate? It goes down. At a certain heart rate, we hit fight or flight. If my resting heart rate is lower, I have more heart beats to give before I hit fight or flight. So if I’m regularly exercising, my resting heart rate will go down. I have less stress, but I also have more room, my window of tolerance is wider. ...That allows us to moderate our response. It will still happen, we can’t stop that, but if we have more heartbeats to give, it’s less likely to cause a problem.

Manage your sleep:

"Sleep is as important, if not more important than exercise. ... Naps can help fill in the gap, but you need a good eight hours."

"If we have good sleep, we can reappraise negative emotions, reframe them or make them look different. … We can accurately perceive them better if we had good sleep. Sleep deprivation leads to being less likely to remember positive events."

-Lee N. Johnson, "What Can You Do to Improve Your Marriage?" BYU Education Week 2015

Make a good marriage better
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"Love is not a feeling. Love is what we do. Love is how we connect to each other."

"There is great power in having fun and being friends."

"It’s not enough just to stay in love with each other. You need to work on staying ‘in like’ with each other too."

"Couples that last are really good friends."

-Scott Braithwaite, "Predictors of Marital Success That We Can Know Prior to Saying 'I Do,'” BYU Education Week 2015

Make a good marriage better
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"Do we appreciate the little things, and do we continually punctuate that appreciation?"

"Disagreements crop up in even the best marriages. It’s how differences are handled that is an important key to marital success or failure."

"You can have a successful, happy, fulfilling marriage if you choose to!"



-Elizabeth Fawcett, "How to Make a Good Marriage Even Better," BYU Education Week 2015