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Scott G Winterton, Deseret News
Boats rest in their berths at the Great Salt Lake Marina near Magna on Tuesday, June 4, 2019. The south arm of the Great Salt Lake is up by 2.5 feet and its north arm is up by 2 feet thanks to the wet water year.

SALT LAKE CITY — The south arm of the Great Salt Lake is up by 2.5 feet since December and its north arm is 2 feet deeper thanks to the wet water year, and the Western Hemisphere's largest saltwater lake will take on even more water in the weeks to come.

"It's a pretty good jump so far, but we're not done yet," said Todd Adams, deputy director of the Utah Division of Water Resources.

The highest elevation snowpack has yet to melt, and with most reservoirs brimming, that water will bypass those storage infrastructures and help quench the thirsty saltwater body.

Scott G Winterton, Deseret News
Boats rest in their berths at the Great Salt Lake Marina near Magna on Tuesday, June 4, 2019. The south arm of the Great Salt Lake is up by 2.5 feet and its north arm is up by 2 feet thanks to the wet water year.

Water managers along the Wasatch Front will be keeping their eye on stream flows and reservoir levels to keep enough storage going into the summer and time releases into rivers to hopefully avoid flooding.

While most reservoirs are already full, Echo above East Canyon sits at just 49 percent of capacity and Rockport sits at 78 percent, ready to take on snowmelt.

"We could have filled it (Echo) twice this year," said Tage Flint, general manager of the Weber Basin Water Conservancy District. "The peak flows have not occurred yet coming out of the Uinta Mountains coming down the Weber River, so we are purposefully leaving Rockport down some and Echo down more to use them as shock absorbers to take those big flows."

Much of that extra water will be sent on downstream to the Great Salt Lake.

Adams said the water will help, but not cure, the drought-parched lake.

"One year is not going to fix 20 years of drought," he said.

There have been years where the precipitation has been exceptional, such as 2011, 2017 and 2005, he added.

Scott G Winterton, Deseret News
Tourists pose for photos at the Great Salt Lake Marina near Magna on Tuesday, June 4, 2019. The south arm of the Great Salt Lake is up by 2.5 feet and its north arm is up by 2 feet thanks to the wet water year.

"It would be nice if we could stack a few of these in a row, but we will take it."

Low water forced sailboat owners to pulltheir vessels from the Great Salt Lake Marina in 2015, and the state of Utah spent about $1.5 million to dredge the marina.

This week, the marina was full of boats readying for the sailing season.

The lake is critical to wildlife, multiple industries, recreation interests and more, contributing $1.3 billion into Utah's economy and drawing tourists from all over the globe.

It serves as the Pacific "flyway" for thousands of migratory birds and supports a $57 million brine shrimp industry.

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Mike Styler, who recently retired as executive director of the Utah Department of Natural Resources, said maintaining the viability of the Great Salt Lake will be one of the critical challenges the state faces going into the future.

He stressed that as agricultural water gets converted for urban use in Weber and Davis counties and reuse of waste water becomes more popular, that threatens to dry up marshes and wetlands that support the lake.

The Great Salt Lake has an average depth of 16 feet, covers 1,700 square miles during an average year and is two to seven times saltier than the ocean.