Lucasfilm
Alden Ehrenreich and Joonas Suotamo star in 2018's "Solo: A Star Wars Story."

SALT LAKE CITY — Lucasfilm president Kathleen Kennedy says Marvel’s approach to films won’t work with the “Star Wars” universe.

Kennedy told Vanity Fair in a recent interview that Lucasfilm and Disney could risk losing fans if they put out too much “Star Wars” content and drift into Marvel Cinematic Universe territory, which had 22 films all connect with one giant narrative.

  • “(I) think that Disney is very respectful of what this is, and right from the beginning we talked about the fragility of this form of storytelling. Because it’s something that means so much to fans that you can’t turn this into some kind of factory approach. You can’t even do what Marvel does, necessarily, where you pick characters and build new franchises around those characters. This needs to evolve differently.”

Not surprising: This isn’t all that surprising, since Disney tried to make a franchise out of new “Star Wars” films. After “The Force Awakens” launched in 2015, Disney released both “Rogue One: A Star Wars Story” and “Solo: A Star Wars Story” in 2016 and 2018, respectively.

2 comments on this story
  • But it didn’t work out. “Solo” fell flat on box office expectations. Disney reportedly canceled a number of “Star Wars” prequel and spinoff projects as a result. As I wrote, Disney called that report “inaccurate.”
  • As I wrote for the Deseret News, Kennedy told MTV News that “Star Wars” will take a break after “Rise of Skywalker.”
  • “We’re using this appropriate time as an opportunity to see where we’re going now that we’re leaving the Skywalker Saga behind,” Kennedy told MTV News. “But there’s no question that there’s certain characters that we’ve created certainly in the last three movies that we may very well wanna see down the line in the future.”

Flashback: Disney CEO Bob Iger said earlier this year that Disney would “take a pause, some time, and rest” on all “Star Wars” films after “The Rise of Skywalker” releases later this year, according to ComicBook.com.