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A Salt Lake man who police say hand delivered a letter to the governor's office threatening vandalism during the upcoming Pioneer Day now faces a criminal charge.

SALT LAKE CITY — A Salt Lake man who police say hand delivered a letter to the governor's office threatening vandalism during the upcoming Pioneer Day now faces a criminal charge.

Anthony Dominic Seven, 50, was charged Tuesday in 3rd District Court with making a threat of terrorism, a second-degree felony.

According to charging documents, on March 8, Seven delivered a letter to Gov. Gary Herbert's office at the state Capitol. The letter was addressed to a U.S. federal magistrate.

"The letter states in part that Seven would be 'retaliating on the government treason on Pioneer Day, July 24, 2019," according to the charges.

Seven then threatens that during the Pioneer Day Parade, he would "break the glass windows along 100 South," including the Wallace F. Bennett Federal Building, the charges state.

The letter acknowledges that "Seven previously made threats to take the lives of multiple public officials, including Bill Clinton, Barack Obama and George Bush," according to court documents.

The letter also demands "a settlement from the government of $100 million," the charges state.

On April 2, investigators learned that Seven had sent an email to Sen. Ron Wyden D-Oregon, regarding Seven's mother who lives in Oregon, the charges state. In the email, Seven talked about the letter he delivered to Hebert and claimed the letter "also details my intended retaliation if government corruption is not remedied."

On April 24, an investigator called the phone number listed on both the letter and email and talked to Seven.

"The FBI is a criminal entity in my case. OK? So, if I say something like, 'I'm going to cut off Robert Mueller's head because he's the responsible party,' you can't do (expletive). And if you touch me, I'm going to … attack you, you understand that?" he told the investigator, according to the charges.

A $100,000 warrant was issued for Seven's arrest.

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In January 2018, Seven was charged with criminal mischief, a class A misdemeanor, in 3rd District Court. In that case, Seven called police after he had broken windows at an abandoned building at 205 E. 200 South because "he thought is was a federal building and the FBI was not helping him," according to charging documents.

In that case, Seven requested to represent himself in court. He was found guilty in September, placed on probation and ordered to undergo a mental health evaluation, according to court records.