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Meghan Thackrey, Deseret News
Sisters Laura Hall, left, and Sarah Bush get ready for a run in Eagle Mountain on Thursday, April 11, 2019. The pair, who survived the 1998 mass shooting at Columbine High School, will run the Boston Marathon on Monday.

EAGLE MOUNTAIN — Two decades after they survived the mass shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado, two sisters will run the Boston Marathon together on Monday.

“As survivors, we feel this very important obligation to spread hope, and 20 years later we finally feel like we can do that,” said Laura Hall, who now lives in Eagle Mountain.

Hall, 34, was a freshman — just 14 years old — on the day two seniors opened fire at the high school. She recalls hiding in the choir room closet and worrying about her sister.

“Before I feared for my own life, I feared for her life,” she said.

He older sister, Sarah Bush, 36, was a sophomore. She remembers the trauma inflicted on her school and community on April 20, 1999, when the gunmen killed 12 students and one teacher.

Meghan Thackrey, Deseret News
Sisters Sarah Bush, left, and Laura Hall are interviewed in Eagle Mountain on Thursday, April 11, 2019. The pair, who survived the 1998 mass shooting at Columbine High School, will run the Boston Marathon on Monday.

“It changed my life,” said Bush, who also lives in Eagle Mountain. “We had to grow up really fast. The things that we had to go through were something nobody should have to go through — especially not kids.”

Afterward, running became a source of healing for Bush. She ran track her junior and senior years at Columbine High School.

“It was a positive thing when there weren’t very many positive things in those next couple of years,” Bush said, adding that running was something she could control.

Hall said she suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and that it took years for her to get the help she needed. She also found a mental escape in running.

“It’s been a saving grace,” she said.

Training together for the Boston Marathon has provided a way for the sisters to cope and stay close.

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“Getting over those hurdles in a marathon, just like we do in your life, it proves to you how strong we are,” Hall said. "We got a second chance at life."

The marathon takes place on Monday, nearly 20 years to the day that their lives changed forever.

“Being together and reaching this huge goal — it’s huge for us,” Bush said.

As each anniversary passes, the two say that they feel stronger and happier.

“We laugh so hard on some of runs,” Hall said. “We’ve actually had to separate ourselves on our runs because we couldn’t make it productive.”