Darron Cummings, Associated Press
In this Jan. 30, 2018, file photo, Cassie Langdon uses her phone to launch the MoviePass app to see what movies are available at AMC Indianapolis 17 theatre in Indianapolis. MoviePass, a discount service for movie tickets at theaters, is walking back a planned 50 percent price increase following a subscriber backlash. But it will soon impose a cap of three movies per month, instead of one every day.

SALT LAKE CITY — MoviePass will likely bring back its $9.95-a-month unlimited plan … with a catch.

  • The movie-ticket subscription service company has been quietly working on bringing back a plan that would be similar to the unlimited plan, which catapulted the company into vitality about two years ago.
  • A source told Business Insider the plan has been delayed for weeks but it should go live in the coming days. Internet inspectors found a landing page on MoviePass’ website for a new deal, but the page has since been taken down.

Yes, but: MoviePass would restrict subscribers choices as a way to curb people from using the plan too much.

  • Business Insider reported that the new terms of use for MoviePass say it "makes no guarantee on the availability to any particular theater, showtime or title that is presented in our app."
  • The company reportedly said in those terms of use that it might use its own algorithms to restrict users "based on their location, day of movie, time of movie, title and the individual user's historical usage."
  • MoviePass would also offer the unlimited plan’s price of $9.95 only if you pay annual through e-check or automated payments, according to CNET.

Context: MoviePass jumped to popularity in August 2017 because of its unlimited plan. But the company fell from grace because of complaints from customers who weren’t allowed to see certain movies. Plenty of people canceled their plans after experiencing issues with the app.

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  • For a short time, MoviePass’ parent company, Helios & Matheson Analytics, promised to launch “MoviePass 2.0,” which would be centered around including subscribers in movies and at premieres, according to my report for the Deseret News.
  • MoviePass reportedly lost more money in 2018 than previously reported too, according to Variety. HMNY revealed as much in a new filing, saying that company had a net loss of $146.7 million — despite a previous estimate of $137.2 million in losses.
  • MoviePass recently lost four executives as well, including its executive vice president, according to my recent report. There were also a slew of layoffs at the company.