Sue Ogrocki, AP
Cans of spring seasonal Alpha Hive Double IPA are ready to be filled with beer at COOP Ale Works in Oklahoma City, Friday, Jan. 18, 2019. America’s drinking habits vary depending on which religious group they belong to, according to a new report from the Pew Research Center.

SALT LAKE CITY — America’s drinking habits vary depending on which religious group they belong to, according to a new Pew Research Center report.

The new report found that religiously active people are less likely to drink alcohol compared to those who are not religious.

“That may not be a surprise: Holy texts from the Christian New Testament to the Quran and the Hindu Dharmashastras warn against the dangers of excessive drinking and other potentially harmful ‘vices,'” according to the Pew report.

The report found:

2 comments on this story
  • 51 percent of those who attend religious services at least once a month have drunk alcohol in the last 30 days.
  • 62 percent of those who attend worship services less often or not at all say the same.
  • 13 percent of monthly church attendees engaged with binge drinking.

Still, not all religious groups avoid alcohol to the same degree.

  • 60 percent of Catholics reported drinking alcohol in the last 30 days.
  • 51 percent of Protestants said they drank alcohol in the last 30 days.
  • 65 percent of those who are religiously unaffiliated said they drank alcohol in the last 30 days.

Read more: Head over to the Pew Research Center’s report to learn more.