Rick Bowmer, Associated Press
In this March 8, 2018, file photo, the sunsets on the Utah State Capitol, in Salt Lake City. Utah lawmakers begin their fourth week of the 2019 legislative session on Tuesday with a full slate of committee meetings in both chambers, including discussion on some amendments to the state's new medical marijuana law.

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah lawmakers begin their fourth week of the 2019 legislative session on Tuesday with a full slate of committee meetings in both chambers, including discussion on some amendments to the state's new medical marijuana law.

SB161 is on this morning's agenda for the Senate Health and Human Services Committee. The proposed changes amend a provision regarding the transportation of cannabis and cannabis products to certain facilities; provide for testing of cannabis at additional stages of production; and delays a provision during the decriminalization period that requires labeling with a bar code on a blister pack containing unprocessed cannabis flower, among other changes.

READ MORE: 'Good faith' bill making fixes to Utah medical marijuana law advanced by committee

Other issues expected to be discussed at the Statehouse during the day include:

  • The House Economic Development and Workforce Services Committee is considering HB296 to create a Rural Coworking and Innovation Center Grant Program within the Governor's Office of Economic Development.
  • The House approved unanimously HB191, which would require physicians or nurse practitioners to discuss the risks of addiction, dangers of mixing opioid medication with other substances, reasons why the prescription may be necessary and other options for treatment with their patients when prescribing opioids.

READ MORE: Utah House OKs bill to require medical professionals to discuss opioids with patients before prescribing

  • The House Education Committee is looking at HB287, which would expand the definition of "position of special trust" in sexual assault crimes to include a teacher, instructor or teaching assistant at an institution of higher education and provide that sexual contact is without consent if the victim is over the age of 18 and the actor holds a position of special trust.

READ MORE: Bill intended to protect young Utah college students from 'predatory professors,' sponsor says

  • Sen. David Hinkins, R-Orangeville — a horse racer himself — is sponsoring SB181, which would allow voters to decide on whether their counties should allow wagers on horse racing or "parimutuel betting."

READ MORE: Utah lawmaker pushing bill to legalize betting on horse races

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  • The House Business and Labor Committee is expected to pick up on SB34, which authorizes incentives for cities to develop affordable housing.
  • A majority of Sen. Daniel Thatcher's fellow Senate Republicans agreed his hate crimes bill should get a committee hearing.

READ MORE: Utah hate crimes bill will get hearing this session

  • After a previous version of the bill failed in front of a committee, the Utah House of Representatives voted Tuesday to approve a watered-down bill to allow cities slightly more power to enforce anti-idling ordinances.

READ MORE: Utah House passes tweaked bill loosening restrictions on local anti-idling ordinances

Here's what happened last week:

5 stories to catch you up on the third week of the Utah Legislature