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Screenshot, Matthew Fitzpatrick/University of Maryland Centre for Environmental Science
A look at what Provo will feel like in 2080.

SALT LAKE CITY — A new interactive map shows how climate change could affect your city by 2020.

Scientists conducted a study that ultimately found cities in North America will feel like cities that are about 500 miles away from where they currently are by the year 2080, according to Science Alert. That is to say, all cities will feel a little warmer, wetter and more like the southern U.S., according to the study.

For example: Washington, D.C., will feel more like the swampy state of Mississippi. Meanwhile, New York will be a little more like Arkansas, according to USA Today.

  • "The children alive today, like my daughter who is 12, they’re going to see a dramatic transformation of climate. It's already underway," said study lead author Matt Fitzpatrick of the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental Science, according to USA Today.
  • "Within the lifetime of children living today, the climate of many regions is projected to change from the familiar to conditions unlike those experienced in the same place by their parents, grandparents, or perhaps any generation in millennia," he said in a press release. "Many cities could experience climates with no modern equivalent in North America."

Utah: We decided to see what would happen to different cities in Utah.

Salt Lake City will feel like Red Bluff, California, in 2080, according to the study's projections.

  • Typical summers in Red Bluff are hotter by 10.5 degrees Fahrenheit and 74.9 percent drier than Salt Lake City summers, according to the map.
  • So, Salt Lake City will become drier and hotter if nothing changes with carbon emissions today.
Screenshot, Matthew Fitzpatrick/University of Maryland Centre for Environmental Science
A look at what Salt Lake City will feel like in 2080.

Ogden will feel more like Haysville, Kansas, which is 7.9 degrees warmer and 222.4 percent wetter than summers in Ogden. So, expect a warmer and wetter climate in Ogden.

Screenshot, Matthew Fitzpatrick/University of Maryland Centre for Environmental Science
A look at what Ogden will feel like in 2080.

Provo will feel like another Utah city — Hurricane, which experiences 13.8-degree warmer winters and a 55.6 percent drier climate.

Screenshot, Matthew Fitzpatrick/University of Maryland Centre for Environmental Science
A look at what Provo will feel like in 2080.
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St. George will feel more like Lake Havasu City, Arizona, where summer temperatures in the city are 10.6 degrees warmer and 23.6 percent drier than in St. George.

Screenshot, Matthew Fitzpatrick/University of Maryland Centre for Environmental Science
A look at what St. George will feel like in 2080.

Logan will feel more like Spanish Fork, which is 7.5 degrees warmer and 17.2 percent drier than summers in Logan.

Screenshot, Matthew Fitzpatrick/University of Maryland Centre for Environmental Science
A look at what Logan will feel like in 2080.

However: These numbers are based on no changes to carbon emissions being made, according to the study. Politicians and lawmakers continue to push for changes to emissions, which could change each of these city's futures.

Test out the map for yourself here.