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A bill that would require the State School Board to develop a statewide survey to ask teachers why they're leaving the profession advanced out of the House on Monday.

SALT LAKE CITY — A bill that would require the State School Board to develop a statewide survey to ask teachers why they're leaving the profession advanced out of the House on Monday.

Despite arguments from some Republicans to keep the state out of the school board's business, the Utah House of Representatives voted to approve HB130 to create a "model exit survey" to help the state gather data on why teachers quit.

"We need to know those things," said the bill's sponsor, Rep. Carol Spackman Moss, D-Holladay. "Without good data, we cannot make good policy."

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Moss cited Utah's yearslong teacher shortage. She has said some teachers have anecdotally blamed stress, low pay and inadequate resources, but the state doesn't have solid data to base changes off of.

The bill includes a $3,000 appropriation of ongoing and $5,000 in one-time funds to cover the cost of developing and implementing the survey.

Rep. Norm Thurston, R-Provo, argued the Utah Legislature shouldn't "micromanage" the State Board of Education, and if it's needed the school board should enact it itself.

But with a 48-24 vote approving the bill, the bill now goes to the Senate for consideration.