AP
President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he leaves the White House, Thursday Jan. 10, 2019, in Washington, en route for a trip to the border in Texas as the government shutdown continues. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A lighthearted look at news of the day:

The art of persuasion reached new heights last week as the president went on prime-time television to tell America he really, really wants a wall, followed by Democratic congressional leaders telling America they really, really don’t want it. The only upside was that it was far better than anything else on prime time.

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This startling development was followed by a high-level meeting Wednesday, in which the president reportedly said he really wants a wall, then walked out when he was surprised to hear Democrats say they really don’t want one.

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Wouldn’t it seem appropriate if all those unpaid federal workers were to receive free food and supplies from some big-box retailer, maybe something called “Wall” Mart?

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If Walmart really did sell border walls, it would do two things. The president wouldn’t need Democrats. He could just go there himself and wave his government credit card, after standing in a checkout line with everyone else. Second, the retailer’s sales would balloon from last year’s $500 billion to at least $505.7 billion.

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If you think the proposed cost of the border wall is high, just wait until next year when the president demands billions more for an alligator-infested moat.

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17 comments on this story

Each side in the great wall debate is hoping to capture public opinion. Judging by social media, however, public opinion was far more interested last week in news that some people saw Beyonce shopping in a Target in L.A., just like a real person.

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The Wall Street Journal surveyed economists and found that, on average, they believe there is a 25 percent chance of a recession this year. That sounds alarming, until you realize it’s about the same chance the Baltimore Orioles have of winning the next World Series.

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With huge tax surpluses looming, Utah lawmakers will convene later this month with money to burn. Sounds like something that won’t help air quality much.