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In a scene that’s almost straight from “The Office,” a California man brought a dead raccoon into a San Francisco McDonald’s and sat down with it at a table.

SALT LAKE CITY — In a scene that’s almost straight from “The Office,” a California man brought a dead raccoon into a San Francisco McDonald’s and sat down with it at a table.

What happened: A video, which KGO-TV defined as “disturbing and disgusting,” led the Department of Public Health to visit the McDonald’s and declare it safe.

  • The Department of Environmental Health told KGO that the restaurant shut down for five hours on Sunday so it could disinfect the room. Health inspectors later said the room was safe.
  • "We want to assure the public that McDonald's addressed the problem appropriately. They cleaned it, sanitized it, which is the main thing for us," said Stephanie Cushing, director of environmental health.
  • Animal control removed the raccoon from the restaurant.

Reaction: McDonald's issued a statement: "Staff cleaned and sanitized the entire dining room and reopened the restaurant two hours later," the statement reads. "The health department visited the restaurant this afternoon and cleared the restaurant for full operations."

Why it matters: According to SF Gate, “the incident is quickly becoming a symbol of the tough situation the city faces with mentally ill citizens and the businesses grappling with serving them.”

5 comments on this story
  • San Francisco Police Department officers visited the scene and gave the man who brought in the raccoon a mental health evaluation. They decided not to detain him.
  • "Based on our information, he didn't meet the criteria (for psychiatric detention)," said Officer Adam Lobsinger, according to SF Gate. "We always offer services. The city has a number of services. When we do a mental health detention, that's a little more in-depth. That means you're a threat to yourself or to others."
  • According to SF Gate, “While the condition of the man with the raccoon can't be confirmed, the incident is an example of the type of difficult situation San Francisco business owners can find themselves in when serving customers who are addicted to drugs or potentially mentally ill.”
  • Rachel Kagan with the city's department of public health said San Francisco has troubled people who need help.
  • "There are troubled people in our city and there are many ways many city agencies are working together to provide support and care for those people as well as to provide public safety protection and improve the quality of life for everybody," she said.