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Eli Lucero
Torrey Green, center, talks to his lawyer, Skye Lazaro, left, and private investigator E. Christian Warmsley, during his rape trial in 1st District Court in Brigham City on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. Green is accused of raping multiple women while he was a football player at Utah State University.

BRIGHAM CITY — She was eating brunch with friends in 2016 when one asked if she had heard about a Utah State University football player accused of sexually assaulting women at the Logan school.

She hadn't read the news reports, but one name came to mind.

"I said, 'Was his name Torrey?' And they said yes," the woman testified in court Monday. "I was also raped by Torrey," she disclosed. Her friends were stunned. They urged her to go to police, but "that sounds like hell," the woman, M.H., recalled thinking. She eventually agreed with them and spoke to detectives in following weeks.

The lag in reporting was one focal point Monday in the rape trial for Torrey Green, the former Utah State linebacker accused of sexually assaulting seven women in their late teens and early 20s who did not know one another.

Eli Lucero
Defense attorney Skye Lazaro, left, talks to prosecuting attorney Spencer Walsh before the start of Torrey Green's rape trial in 1st District Court in Brigham City on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. Green is accused of raping multiple women while he was a football player at Utah State University.

Prosecutors in opening arguments painted Green, 25, as a predator who carefully planned out the attacks on first dates, charming and disarming young women at different points from 2013 to 2015 before forcing himself on them and saying they would enjoy the sex even as they tried to resist him. The state drew on an expert's testimony that most sexual assault victims don't go to police right away.

"Defendant does not take no for an answer," said deputy Cache County attorney Barbara Lachmar. She pointed to smiling photographs of the women on an easel as she recounted six assaults Green is charged with carrying out, describing the terror and lasting trauma investigators say was inflicted.

Skye Lazaro, Green's defense attorney, told the jury of six men and five women that rape is despicable, and it's something her client will say himself later in the trial.

She suggested the alleged victims, not Green, are the ones who took advantage. The allegations surfaced only after Green was signed as a rookie lineman for the Atlanta Falcons, she argued.

"We're here because these girls were upset at him," either because they were caught by a boyfriend, didn't get another date with Green or wanted attention, she said. In 2016, The NFL team dropped Green amid the reports of assault. But he "should have a Super Bowl ring" Lazaro said.

The woman who disclosed her rape at brunch two years ago, M.H., testified that guilt and a desire to stop the alleged pattern of assaults motivated her to meet with investigators.

"I felt like maybe if I had done something about it sooner, it wouldn't have happened to all the other women," she said.

In joint preliminary hearings, four other women testified that they were raped the first time they were alone with Green, and a sixth said he forced his body on hers and touched her inappropriately but did not rape her.

Eli Lucero
Prosecuting attorney Barbara Lachmar gives her opening statement during Torrey Green's rape trial in 1st District Court in Brigham City on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. Green is accused of raping multiple women while he was a football player at Utah State University.

In November 2013, at age 24, M.H. met Green on Tinder and they first met up at a library on campus, where he seemed cute, charming and trustworthy, she told jurors.

So she agreed to go to his apartment for dinner, where he cooked her fried chicken and they listened to music before he started to massage her back and began removing her clothes. She tried to push him away and told him she didn't want sex but eventually froze, she said Monday. She decided not to report what happened because she wanted to move on, she testified.

Lazaro questioned why M.H. later went to a party Green hosted and invited her to after the assault.

"I wanted to prove to myself that I was in control," she replied.

Another woman, C.D., told jurors she agreed to eat dinner and watch a movie with Green on October 2014 after they met on campus. While they kissed, Green began to grab her legs, buttocks and chest "but I kept saying no," she testified. He pushed the 18-year-old freshman on the bed and raped her, and she allowed him to give her a ride after to a friend's house so she could leave, she said.

She didn't initially tell anyone what happened because "I was afraid to ruin somebody's life and I was scared to accept that it had happened," she added, but was moved to come forward by 2016 news reports detailing similar assaults by Green.

Lazaro questioned why the woman got in Green's car and noted she could have gone to police much earlier.

"I could have, but I wasn't ready to," she responded.

Eli Lucero
Defense attorney Skye Lazaro, left, talks to private investigator E. Christian Warmsley during Torrey Green's rape trial in 1st District Court in Brigham City on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. Green is accused of raping multiple women while he was a football player at Utah State University.

Kyle Hancock, a psychologist at Mt. Logan Clinic in Ogden, testified that most sexual assault victims freeze instead of fighting back, and about 65 to 90 percent don't report to police immediately. Hancock said he was speaking broadly and hadn't reviewed medical evaluations of the six women.

Green, of Rubidoux, California, has been held without bail in the Cache County Jail since he was charged in August 2016. Dressed in a suit, he sat quietly in Brigham City's 1st District Court Monday, with several family members sitting behind him in the gallery. They declined comment outside the courtroom.

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A judge in May agreed to move the case out of Logan after Green's attorneys argued he would not get a fair trial there in the high-profile case. Six of the cases were merged into one trial last year after prosecutors argued each contains similar allegations and the women were permitted to testify at one another's trials. A trial date for the separate case has not yet been set.

Green, who graduated from USU in 2016, is charged with six counts of rape, two counts of object rape and one count of aggravated kidnapping, first-degree felonies; and two counts of forcible sexual abuse, a second-degree felony.

Correction: An earlier version incorrectly said Torrey Green is accused of raping seven women. He is actually charged with raping six women and attempting to rape another.