1 of 3
Netflix
Sandra Bullock appears in "Birdbox."

SALT LAKE CITY — There’s a reason why you didn’t see the villain of the new Netflix hit film "Bird Box."

What’s going on: At least 45 million accounts watched the Netflix film, which was released Dec. 21 and has become the talk of social media, according to The Verge. Viewers, however, might notice that the film’s monster never appears in plain sight.

  • See, in the film, whenever someone looks at the film’s monsters or dark creature, they immediately want to commit suicide. This leads to millions of people across the globe ending their lives.
  • But the monsters never appear outright in the film, according to Mashable. And fans are still wondering why we never see them.

Why not?: Screenwriter Eric Heisserer told Bloody Disgusting (warning: mature language in the interview) that the monsters were originally set to make an appearance in the film. But they decided against it.

  • "There was a time when one of the producers was like, 'No, you have to see something at some point' and forced me to write essentially a nightmare sequence where Malorie experiences one in that house," Heisserer said.
  • Star Sandra Bullock, who played Malorie, described the monsters in the same interview.
  • "It was a green man with a horrific baby face," she said. "It was snake-like, and I was like, 'I don’t want to see it when it first happens. Just bring it into the room. We’ll shoot the scene.' I turn and he’s like this (growling at me.) It’s making me laugh. It was just a long fat baby."
  • Director Susanne Bier said the monsters were funny, too.
Comment on this story
  • "Whatever those beings are, they tap into your deepest fear. Everybody’s deepest fear is going to be different from the other person. I think to suddenly take upon a concrete shape in order to illustrate that becomes weak. Where the concept is really strong, then trying to illustrate it is kind of almost meaningless. So it would have been the wrong decision," she said.

Disclaimer: "Bird Box" contains mature language, as well of scenes of graphic violence, partial nudity and a brief depiction of sexual situations.