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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned U.S. consumers that they should not eat romaine lettuce since it might contain E. coli.

SALT LAKE CITY — The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned U.S. consumers they should not eat romaine lettuce since it might contain E. coli.

  • So far, 32 people have been infected with the outbreak strain across 11 states, including 13 people who were hospitalized because of their ailment.
  • No deaths have been reported.
  • However, one hospitalized person developed hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is a life-threatening form of kidney failure, CNN reports.

Frustration: The E. coli is tied to romaine lettuce, but they haven’t identified a specific grower.

  • "Most of the romaine lettuce being harvested right now is coming from the California region, although there's some lettuce coming in from Mexico," said FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb.
  • “The CDC is not claiming that all romaine contains the dangerous bacteria — something the millions of people who have eaten the popular lettuce recently should bear in mind — but investigators don’t know precisely where, when or how the contamination happened,” The Washington Post reported.
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Where: The E. coli has been reported in California, Connecticut, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio and Wisconsin. No reports in Utah yet.

Canada: The Public Health Agency of Canada reported that 18 people have become sick from the same strain in Ontario and Quebec.

Symptoms: People who get sick from E. coli suffer within two to eight days after they swallow the germ, according to CDC.

Flashback: Earlier this year, an outbreak of romaine lettuce lasted for four months from March to June, according to Vox. The outbreak sickened 210 people.