Lee Jin-man, Associated Press
The Olympic Rings are placed at the beach before sunrise in Gangneung, South Korea, Wednesday, Jan. 24, 2018.

A lighthearted look at news of the day:

Members of the U.S. Olympic Committee were in Utah last week. And, no, they weren’t looking for that French judge who was accused of trying to rig the figure skating competition back in 2002.

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The USOC is considering making Salt Lake its bid city again for the Winter Olympics. If that happens, the Canadians could finally retrieve that Lucky Loonie they buried under the ice at the Maverick Center before someone trips on it.

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It’s official: New York City and Arlington, Virginia, and to a lesser extent Nashville, won the sweepstakes in the race to get some new Amazon headquarters facilities. All they had to pay the world’s richest man and his $1 trillion company was $2 billion in taxpayer funds. Such a deal. For the losing cities, don’t worry. That prince in Nairobi still has millions of dollars waiting for you in a bank somewhere if you’ll just send him money.

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Utah officials had little to say about this. But then, they paid $5.7 million and all they got was an Amazon distribution center.

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Facebook, meanwhile, is in trouble after The New York Times revealed it had paid a service to spread disparaging information about its rivals, including Google. Maybe Facebook ought to ban itself from … well … Facebook.

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After this month’s elections, politicians are hoping the federal government will make more money available for states to upgrade their voting equipment. Utah, for instance, hopes to afford a more modern vote-counting abacus.

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I won’t say the vote counting was slow this year, but word has it the courier almost wore out his donkey carrying ballots in from all the polling locations.

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Next time maybe we could just invite everyone by turns into Rice-Eccles Stadium and ask for a show of hands.

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In Florida, meanwhile, social scientists may want to examine how economic development efforts have been able to attract an exact equal number of Republicans, Democrats and attorneys to move to the state.