David Goldman, Associated Press
This Nov. 19, 2013, file photo shows a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention logo at the agency's federal headquarters in Atlanta. A new report from the CDC revealed which jobs have the highest risk of suicide.

SALT LAKE CITY — A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed which jobs have the highest risk of suicide.

Men: Jobs associated with construction and extraction represent lines of work that have the highest rate of deaths by suicide for men, according to the CDC’s report. About 43.6 and 53.2 workers per 100,000 people with those jobs died by suicide in 2012 and 2015, respectively.

Jobs in the arts, design, entertainment, sports and media placed second, followed by installation, maintenance and repair jobs.

Women: For women, jobs associated with the arts, design, entertainment, sports and media represented the highest rate of suicide: 11.7 and 15.6 per 100,000, respectively.

  • Jobs in ”protective service” and “health care support” placed within the CDC's top three.

Why?: The report, which measured suicides by job for the years 2012 and 2015, said there has been a rise in people taking their lives in general.

Comment on this story
  • The report doesn’t explain the numbers. However, it does suggest that strategies can be put in place to help prevent suicides among those professions.
  • “It's an alarming trend, and no single factor seems to be responsible. Changes in economic security can go some way to explain the figures, as can social isolation and other forms of psychological stress,” according to ScienceAlert.
  • Substance abuse and declining mental health were named as potential reasons for workers taking their own lives. But, according to ScienceAlert, “the issue of suicide is evidently too complex for a simple, one-size-fits-all solution.”

Solutions: Deb Houry, the director of the CDC National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, said society should focus on who’s most at risk and put strategies in place to help them.

  • "Increasing suicide rates in the U.S. are a concerning trend that represent a tragedy for families and communities and impact the American workforce,” she said.