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Surgeon performing eye surgery

SALT LAKE CITY ― Curtis Cosby was going in for what he thought would be a routine cataract surgery to restore his vision.

“After the quick procedure, the doctor injected a medication that was supposed to speed up healing and spare him the inconvenience of buying eye drops later,” BuzzFeed reported.

But that medication, which was a botched knockoff of the drug TriMoxi (which is often injected into one's eye during cataract surgery), would soon prove to be anything but “convenient” for Cosby.

According to BuzzFeed, about two weeks later Cosby was driving his car and noticed he had lost the vision in his right eye. (The Dallas Morning News reported in 2017 that Cosby lost vision in his left eye.)

Cosby is one of 68 people who were reportedly left partially blind after the administration of the knockoff drug during eye surgery.

The Professional Compounding Centers of America, who supposedly came up with the knockoff TriMoxi recipe, and Guardian Pharmacy Services, the pharmacy that mixed it, have both been accused of being responsible for negligence that has caused 68 people to see glares, spots, flashing lights, or, in some cases, complete darkness, according to multiple news reports, including the Daily Beast. (Guardian Pharmacy Services is not related to another pharmacy with the same name, which is headquartered in Atlanta, BuzzFeed reported.).

Both organizations have rejected the blame.

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The story, which was originally published by the Dallas Morning News last year, has started to make headlines again after two of the patients filed lawsuits last week. The PCCA, Guardian and the clinics where the surgeries were performed are all targets of the lawsuits.

One of the patients told BuzzFeed he remembered seeing a commercial for the clinic with the tagline, “Come see us—we’ll change your life.”

“I’ve never seen a truer commercial in my life,” the patient said.

According to Buzzfeed, Imprimis, the original inventors of TriMoxi, have maintained that the original formula is safe.

You can read more about the lawsuit and Cosby's story at BuzzFeed News.