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Traffic moves slowly on I-15 in South Salt Lake on Tuesday, Nov. 21, 2017.

SALT LAKE CITY — Instagram is officially a verb.

Merriam-Webster announced Tuesday that Instagram will join the class of companies whose names can be used as a verb, like Google or Xerox.

According to Time magazine, the dictionary will define Instagram as a social media platform and “a word that refers to posting a picture on the social media platform of the same name.”

Instagram was among 840 new terms and definitions added to the dictionary.

“Instagrammable” was also added to the dictionary since it describes photos that can be added to Instagram.

Peter Sokolowski, editor-at-large for Merriam-Webster, told Time magazine that social media has become a place of performance for many people.

Social media and the internet have now created words to describe what we do with those specific apps, Sokolowski said.

Other new words added to the dictionary included “TL;DR,” which means “too long; didn’t read.” The words “bingeable,” “biohacking” and “hangry” also joined the list of new words.

“If the above hasn't already made this abundantly clear the TL;DR of all this is that the dictionary can also be a bingeable time suck with a lot to say about life itself,” Merriam-Webster said in a statement.

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Back in June, Dictionary.com added “Spida” — the nickname of Utah Jazz star Donovan Mitchell — to its ranks as an official entry, according to the Deseret News.

The entry was listed as a slang term.

The dictionary defined “Spida” as “a basketball species usually found above the rim; equipped with superhuman senses, shot-slinging abilities and unrivaled balance.” It’s also cited as the “nickname of Donovan Mitchell, record-breaking shooting guard for the Utah Jazz and contender for NBA’s 2018 Rookie of the Year.”