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Historians currently believe rain and muddy conditions helped the Allied army defeat the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo.

SALT LAKE CITY — Dear history buffs: There might be a new reason why Napoleon didn’t win at Waterloo.

A new research paper says that an Indonesian volcanic eruption caused poor weather across the globe, which ultimately led to Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo, according to a press release from the Imperial College London.

Historians now believe rain and muddy conditions helped the Allied army defeat the French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte at the Battle of Waterloo.

According to the new report published in Geology, a volcano called Mount Tambora erupted on Sumbawa, an Indonesia island, which killed 100,000 people.

The earth then suffered from a “year without a summer,” according to the new research.

The new research posits that the eruption caused the electrical current in the ionosphere to cause heavy cloud formation. The clouds brought heavy rain throughout Europe, ultimately leading to Napoleon’s defeat.

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Matthew Genge, from Imperial's Department of Earth Science and Engineering, said his research shows that volcanic ash could levitate higher than previously thought, reaching the ionosphere and creating heavy cloud coverage.

"Victor Hugo in the novel 'Les Miserables' said of the Battle of Waterloo: 'an unseasonably clouded sky sufficed to bring about the collapse of a World.' Now we are a step closer to understanding Tambora's part in the battle from half a world away."

Genge’s research said there’s a direct connect between the “act of God” and Napoleon’s defeat, which ended the Napoleonic Wars, according to Sky News.