Chuck Zlotnick, Disney-Marvel
This image released by Marvel Studios shows, front row from left, Danai Gurira, Chadwick Boseman, Chris Evans, Scarlet Johansson and Sebastian Stan in a scene from "Avengers: Infinity War." The supersized superhero hit has crossed $2 billion in worldwide ticket sales, becoming only the fourth film to reach that rarified box-office milestone. (Chuck Zlotnick/Marvel Studios via AP)

SALT LAKE CITY — Marvel Studios boss Kevin Feige just dished out some awful news about the ending of “Avengers: Infinity War.”

An ongoing fan theory about the film posited that it wasn’t just humans who died after Thanos (Josh Brolin) snapped his fingers, but animals, too.

Feige confirmed the theory.

Russ Fischer of Birth. Movies. Death. asked Feige, “I do need to confirm something about the outcome of Infinity War, and apologies if you’ve addressed this — the end of Ant-Man and the Wasp led to conversations. Are half the animals dead? Are half of the horses gone? Half of the ants?”

Feige responded, “Yes! Yes. All life.”

According to Uproxx, the reveal is devastating for pet lovers.

"So, there you have it. Half of all the dogs in the universe (and their fleas) have disintegrated, which seems like almost too much to bear,” according to Uproxx. “While there have been conflicting takes on whether the death and destruction shall be reversed in the next 'Avengers' film, this news still hits too hard for comfort. Not the puppies!”

The Feige interview does reveal some spoilers about the recent “Ant-Man and the Wasp” movie released last week. It also teases the upcoming “Captain Marvel.”

Feige said that production is almost finished on the untitled “Avengers 4,” too.

Anthony and Joe Russo revealed in an interview with Comicbook.com they wanted to show off the human response to Thanos’ snap instead of cutting to black.

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"It was always a plan to show beyond that because when we made the decision to have the snaps themselves, that's a plot trick to cut to black after an incident like that happens," co-director Joe Russo told ComicBook.com. "And it doesn't give you any emotional resonance or catharsis. What he said thinking about it realistically; the true heartbreak doesn't lie in the fact that he snapped his fingers, it lies in the fact that people have to watch loved ones, and we have to watch characters that we care about die. And that's where the real heartbreak lies for the characters who live in the Universe and for those of us watching the movie."