Jordan Strauss, Invision
FILE - In this March 23, 2018 file photo, John Goodman, left, and Roseanne Barr arrive at the Los Angeles premiere of "Roseanne" in Burbank, Calif. ABC has cancelled its hit reboot of “Roseanne” following her racially insensitive tweet about former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett, Tuesday, May 29. ABC Entertainment President Channing Dungey said the comment “is abhorrent, repugnant and inconsisten with our values, and we have decided to cancel the show.” (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

“Roseanne” might be brought back to a streaming service that has little to no popularity.

Michael Caputo, who previously worked as a campaign aide for President Donald Trump and chief marketing officer for the startup streaming service Bond, told The Daily Beast he plans to reach out to Roseanne Barr, the star of the show, to talk about a possible reboot after ABC canceled the show in the wake of Barr’s racist and anti-Semitic tweets.

Caputo said he’d like to “to reach out to Roseanne (Barr) immediately.”

“We always planned on reaching out to Roseanne eventually,” Caputo told The Daily Beast. “Now it’s sooner rather than later.”

Caputo said Barr’s show is prime content for his streaming service, which relies on investing and crowdfunding, according to The Huffington Post. The service connects video creators with investors, according to Wired.

Caputo said the show can be used to bring “conservative-minded backers eager to tip the balance of political power in Hollywood.”

The Daily Beast obtained slides for the “Roseanne” pitch — titled “The Roseanne Effect” — which say the show was “(disrupting) Hollywood orthodoxy” and that its audience, the “pro-Trump middle America,” had previously been “ignored by elites.”

“Roseanne may have a domino effect on Hollywood,” the presentation said. It “accelerates (the) end of (the) Hollywood elite.”

ABC canceled “Roseanne” on Tuesday after Barr tweeted comments about former President Barack Obama aide Valerie Jarrett, calling her an “offspring of the Muslim Brotherhood & Planet of the Apes.”

“Roseanne’s Twitter statement is abhorrent, repugnant and inconsistent with our values, and we have decided to cancel her show,” ABC Entertainment president Channing Dungey said in a statement, according to Variety.

Hulu, Paramount Network, TV Land and CMT all pulled the show from their networks, too. It’s unlikely any other mainstream network will try to pick up the show, according to USA Today.

Barr later apologized for her comments in another tweet, according to the Deseret News.

"I am truly sorry for making a bad joke about (Jarrett's) politics and her looks," Barr tweeted.

She added, "I should have known better. Forgive me-my joke was in bad taste."

On Wednesday, Barr — who is a native of Salt Lake City and served as the grand marshal for the Salt Lake City Pride Parade in 2011, according to the Deseret News — blamed her tweets on the drug Ambien, CNN reported.

"Guys I did something unforgiveable so do not defend me. It was 2 in the morning and I was ambien tweeting — it was memorial day too — i went 2 far & do not want it defended — it was egregious Indefensible. I made a mistake I wish I hadn't but...don't defend it please,” she tweeted.

She added, "Not giving excuses for what I did (tweeted) but I've done weird stuff while on Ambien — cracked eggs on the wall at 2am etc."

Trump broke his silence on the show’s cancellation Wednesday, criticizing Disney CEO Bob Iger in a tweet.

"Bob Iger of ABC called Valerie Jarrett to let her know that 'ABC does not tolerate comments like those' made by Roseanne Barr. Gee, he never called President Donald J. Trump to apologize for the HORRIBLE statements made and said about me on ABC. Maybe I just didn't get the call?"

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According to The Daily Beast, Caputo’s Bond streaming service — which offers the service in Russian since the app’s co-founders, Vlad Lobak and Den Tomor, are from there — prompted interest from Senate investigators who were looking into whether Russia interfered in the 2016 presidential election.

Caputo sent the Senate Intelligence Committee slideshows on the product.

"They didn’t seem all that intrigued and we didn’t talk about it,” he recalled. “The Mueller team was even less interested.”