Screenshot Will Smith Instagram
Smith posted a throwback Thursday photo of himself skydiving with his sons. He described the high amount of fear he felt for skydiving.

SALT LAKE CITY — Will Smith shared an Instagram post last week that revealed his thoughts about God and fear.

As Relevant magazine reported, Smith posted a throwback Thursday photo of himself skydiving with his sons in which he described the high amount of fear he felt for skydiving.

“Skydiving is a really interesting confront with fear … So you get onto the airplane and you’re sitting there, you fly and you go up to 14,000 feet and the guy walks up (to the edge) and you’re looking down to death! Terror! They say on three … and you fall out of the airplane and in one second you realize that it’s the most blissful experience of your life.”

But, he said, there’s a benefit that comes on the other side of that fear.

“You realize at the point of maximum danger, is the point of minimum fear,” Smith said. “God placed the best things in life on the other side of fear.”

#tbt 2014 ~ God Placed the Best Things in Life on the Other Side of FEAR!

A post shared by Will Smith (@willsmith) on

In 2015, Smith worked on the film "Concussion" that dealt with religion. He played Dr. Bennet Omalu, a Christian doctor from Nigeria who became famous for discovering a link between concussions from football and their effects on the brain. Smith said his grandmother helped him better understand the Christian mindset he needed for the role.

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“My grandmother was really my connection to God,” he told the Christian Post. “She was my spiritual teacher, she was that grandmother at the church, the one having the kids doing the Easter presentations and putting on the Christmas plays and her kids and grandkids had to be first. She was the most spiritually certain person that I had ever met in my entire life. Even to the point that when she was dying she was happy, like she was really excited about going to heaven.”

Omalu said Smith had a religious experience after spending a lot of time with the Nigerian-born doctor.

"He spent time with me and he was very observant. And, in fact, he (Smith) had said what made him accept the role was meeting me," Omalu told The Christian Post. "The spiritual stuff is deep. We met, we shared and we communed the love of God, and he also saw the light. The spirit of God also touched him."