Victoria Jones, Pool PA
Invitations for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's wedding in May, after they have been printed at the workshop of Barnard and Westwood in London Thursday March 22, 2018. Prince Harry and Meghan will get married at St George's Chapel in Windsor Castle on Saturday May 19. (Victoria Jones/Pool via AP)

SALT LAKE CITY — Kensington Palace finally revealed photos late last week of the wedding invitations for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.

The photos show the classic invitations that follow royal tradition, including the three-feather badge of the Prince of Wales, printed in the classic gold ink.

But a little-known fact: the English cards used American ink, “which sounds like a nod to the Harry and Meghan's nationalities,” according to Mashable.

In fact, according to the Kensington Palace Twitter account, the invitations “are printed in gold and black, then burnished to bring out the shine and gilded around the edge.”

According to the palace, Lottie Small at Barnard Westwood made all the invitations with a machine from the 1930s through a process called die stamping.

“Lottie Small, who recently completed her apprenticeship, printed all of the invitations in a process known as die stamping, on a machine from the 1930s that she affectionately nicknamed Maude,” the palace tweeted.

Comment on this story

Earlier this month, Markle and Prince Harry announced that they were opening their wedding to the public, according to the Deseret News. The couple invited 2,640 members of the public to the wedding. The lord lieutenants will select 1,200 people from the U.K. to see the wedding live. The other 1,440 people are from the Windsor Castle community, the Royal Households and Crown Estate, local charities and other organizations.

As the wedding draws near, Markle, in her first outing with the Queen of England, paid tribute to Princess Diana, wearing a beret designed by one of Diana’s favorite designers.