Kristin Murphy, Deseret News
Utah Utes forward Jayce Johnson (34) reacts to dunking the ball during a men's basketball game against the LSU Tigers at the Huntsman Center in Salt Lake City on Monday, March 19, 2018. Utah won 95-71.

Here’s a look at the news for March 20.

Intermountain Healthcare employees brace for job cuts

CEO Marc Harrison told the Deseret News that more job cuts are coming to Intermountain Healthcare, and they would only affect “an extremely small percentage of our overall workforce.”

He said no doctors, nurses or techs will lose their jobs.

One former executive told Deseret News that he took another job when he noticed Intermountain Healthcare was straying away from his values.

“There was always a high level of trust and mutual respect amongst employees and management, and that has been destroyed,” the former executive said.

Read more.

Utes advance in NIT quarterfinals

The University of Utah continues to roll in the NIT, defeating the LSU Tigers, 95-71, Monday night at the Huntsman Center, according to the Deseret News.

This is the first time the Utes advanced to the quarterfinals since 1992.

The team will face the winner of the Saint Mary's-Washington game Wednesday night for a chance to advance to the semifinals.

“We seemed to be ready. We got the ball moving. We played hard. We got out in transition and ran,” said Utah coach Larry Krystkowiak. “Their team’s a little bit beat up, so they’re not as deep as they normally are, and I think we always try to take advantage of some of the elevation opportunities.”

Read more at the Deseret News.

Package explodes en route to Austin

A package on its way to Austin, Texas, exploded at a FedEx facility in San Antonio early Tuesday morning, according to USA Today.

The bomb exploded at about 12:30 a.m. while the package was in the sorting area of the facility. One person was treated for minor injuries after the explosion.

FBI San Antonio spokeswoman Michelle Lee said the package was likely linked to the four serial bomber attacks in Austin that have led to two deaths.

"It would be silly for us not to admit that we suspect it’s related,” she said.

Read more at USA Today.

HCI joins study on leukemia

The Huntsman Cancer Institute will join an extensive study that will look to find “better determining which new treatments work best for acute myeloid leukemia patients on a case-by-case basis,” according to the Deseret News.

The study will use genetic traits to help people choose an individual treatment route for a patient.

"It's basically tailoring a treatment approach to what's wrong with the leukemia cells in a given patient," said Dr. Michael Deininger, who is also chief of the Division of Hematology and Hematologic Malignancies at the University of Utah School of Medicine. "The idea is to return this information ... so fast that you can start specific, personalized treatment right from the beginning."

The trial of the study will find their genetic test results in a few days, Deininger said.

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"What we can do now is get DNA sequencing back within one week and in many cases ... these patients can be treated (for their specific case) with these drugs right up front, which is hopefully going to make a difference," he said.

Read more.

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