Rick Bowmer
FILE - State Sen. Evan J. Vickers, left, R-Cedar City and state Sen. Brian E. Shiozawa, right, R-Salt Lake, speak at the Utah State Capitol Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, in Salt Lake City. An investigation into a woman who turned up at Vickers hotel room door and claimed to be his date has ended, with the Utah Highway Patrol saying it was unable to identify the woman.

SALT LAKE CITY — An investigation into a woman who turned up at a senator's hotel room door and claimed to be his date has ended, with the Utah Highway Patrol saying it was unable to identify the woman.

Senate President Wayne Niederhauser, R-Sandy, said UHP concluded its investigation Wednesday into the Feb. 8 incident at the Little America Hotel involving Sen. Evan Vickers, R-Cedar City.

Even so, Niederhauser said, "it's a good reminder to us as legislators that we need to be cautious, that we need to be vigilant, especially during the legislative session."

The Senate president said there was no need to investigate further.

Niederhauser said Vickers told him the investigation suggests that "maybe it was a wrong door, and maybe she went to some other place in the hotel. But that's all conjecture. … We don't know what the situation was."

Vickers, who was interviewed by authorities and reviewed hotel surveillance tape, told reporters the day after the incident that when he responded to a knock on his hotel room door about 6 p.m., a "young lady" was standing there.

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He said she told him, "I'm your date and we have reservations downtown," but he repeatedly insisted, "No, you're not" and closed the door. Vickers described her as "normal" looking and said she did not know his name.

Vickers said then that it "certainly had all the feel of entrapment."

The incident occurred the day after a British tabloid reported former Rep. Jon Stanard, a Republican from St. George, paid an escort for trysts at another downtown hotel twice the previous summer. Standard resigned earlier that week.