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The fitness app Freeletics recently surveyed 2,000 Americans about how they deal with stress every day, what constitutes as a bad day and how it affects people’s health.

A new survey of working Americans identified how many bad days you’ll have in a year.

The fitness app Freeletics recently surveyed 2,000 Americans about how they deal with stress every day, what constitutes as a bad day and how bad days affect people’s health.

The survey found the average American experiences about 60 bad days every year, according to Fox News, which reported on the study.

About 67 percent of respondents said that lack of sleep was the biggest reason for bad days. Feeling sick, financial worries and work-related stresses also contributed to bad days.

“Life is complicated, and bad days are inevitable, but as this study shows, many Americans may be having the blues too often,” according to StudyFinds.org.

One in 4 Americans said the lack of hot water in a shower ruined their day as well, according to Fox News. Heartbreak over sports, having plans fall through and a bad hair day all led to horrible days.

According to the New York Post, the company said hitting the gym can help you cut back on your daily stresses.

“These findings make a lot of sense, as working out after a tough day can be a very effective stress reliever, especially because it boosts those all-important endorphin levels,” says John-Francis Kennedy, training specialist at Freeletics, according to Fox News.

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Of course, Steve Chwartz of LifeHacker contests that there’s no such thing as a bad day.

In fact, believing you will have a bad day often leads to more bad things happen, according to Peter J. Bentley, Ph.D and best-selling author.

“Yes, and it's our fault, I'm afraid! The statistics show that people who believe in bad luck will have more accidents on Friday the 13th. Those who have a negative attitude are more likely to endow normal little mishaps with some mystical significance,” he told LifeHacker.